West Indian Business History: Enterprise and Entrepreneurship
$9.99

West Indian Business History: Enterprise and Entrepreneurship

By Professor B W Higman, Kathleen E A Monteith
US$ 9.99
Book Description

Business and banking history are relatively underdeveloped fields within the English-speaking Caribbean and many of the books published on particular business and banking institutions are of dubious merit. A good number of these monographs are little more than

vanity publications issued to commemorate a marketing milestone or a corporate birthday. Often, these texts are lavishly illustrated, expensively bound, and, given their privileged access to archives, well sourced.

Generally published to serve an audience of shareholders and staff members, they are rarely critical. Similarly, histories of foreign business and banking institutions operating in the West Indies often have the veneer of academic legitimacy (established scholars are commissioned

to write them, reputable university presses are enlisted to publish them) but their authors are constrained by the needs of their patrons and the histories they recount are often deployed for the strategic aims of the institution. With little work to constitute a scholarly tradition of business and banking history in the English-speaking Caribbean, it is no wonder that two recent texts-West Indian Business History: Enterprise and Entrepreneurship, edited by historians Barry Higman and Kathleen E.A. Monteith, and A History of Money and Banking in Barbados, 1627-

1973, authored by economist Eric Armstrong-both begin by noting that the field is neglected. Both works are attempts at redressing this neglect and developing a tradition of scholarship on Caribbean business and banking history.

Table of Contents
  • Contents
  • Preface and Acknowledgements
  • 1. West Indian Business History: Scale and Scope
  • SECTION 1. Merchants, Privateer sand Planters
    • 2. “A Frugal, Prudential and Hopeful Trade”: Privateering in Jamaica, 1655–1689
    • 3. Planters and Merchants: The Oliver Family of Antigua and London, 1716–1784
    • 4. Incalculability as a Feature of Sugar Production during the Eighteenth Century
    • 5. Women in the Trinidad Cocoa Industry, 1870–1945
  • SECTION 2. Bankers and Financiers
    • 6. Patterns of Investment and Sources of Credit in the British West Indian Sugar Industry, 1838–1897
    • 7. Financing Agriculture and Trade: Barclays Bank (DCO) in the West Indies, 1926–1945*
    • 8. Black Economic Empowerment in Barbados, 1937–1970: The Role of the Non-Bank Financial Intermediaries
  • SECTION 3. Traders, Transporters and Retailers
    • 9. Joseph Rachell and Rachael Pringle-Polgreen: Petty Entrepreneurs
    • 10. The Economic Role of the Chinese in Jamaica: The Grocery Retail Trade
    • 11. The Rise of Black Businesses in Barbados, 1900–1966
  • Suggested Further Readings
  • Index
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