The French Revolution - Volume 2
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The French Revolution - Volume 2

By Hippolyte Taine
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Book Description

Part of the series Origins of contemporary France. [v.2-4]

Table of Contents
  • THE ORIGINS OF CONTEMPORARY FRANCE, VOLUME 3
  • THE FRENCH REVOLUTION, VOLUME 2.
  • PREFACE:
  • BOOK FIRST. THE JACOBINS.
  • CHAPTER I. THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE NEW POLITICAL ORGAN.
  • I.—Principle of the revolutionary party.
  • II.—The Jacobins.
  • III.—Psychology of the Jacobin.
  • IV.—What the theory promises.
  • CHAPTER II.
  • I.—Formation of the party.
  • II.—Spontaneous associations after July 14, 1789.
  • III.—How they view the liberty of the press.
  • IV.—Their rallying-points.
  • V.—Small number of Jacobins.
  • BOOK SECOND. THE FIRST STAGE OF THE CONQUEST.
  • CHAPTER I. THE JACOBINS COME INTO IN POWER.
  • I.—Their siege operations.
  • II.—Annoyances and dangers of public elections.
  • III.—The friends of order deprived of the right of free assemblage.
  • V.—Intimidation and withdrawal of the Conservatives.
  • CHAPTER II.
  • I.—Composition of the Legislative Assembly.
  • II.—Degree and quality of their intelligence and Culture.
  • III.—Aspects of their sessions.
  • IV.—The Parties.
  • V.—Their means of action.
  • VI.—Parliamentary maneuvers.
  • CHAPTER III.
  • I.—Policy of the Assembly.—State of France at the end of 1791.
  • II.—The Assembly hostile to the oppressed and favoring oppressors.
  • III.—War.
  • IV.—Secret motives of the leaders.
  • V.—Effects of the war on the common people.
  • CHAPTER IV. THE DEPARTMENTS.
  • I.—Provence in 1792.—Early supremacy of the Jacobins in Marseilles.
  • II.—The expedition to Aix.
  • III.—The Constitutionalists of Arles.
  • IV.—The Jacobins of Avignon.
  • V.—The other departments.
  • CHAPTER V. PARIS.
  • I.—Pressure of the Assembly on the King.
  • II.—The floating and poor population of Paris.
  • III.—Its leaders.—Their committee.—Methods for arousing the crowd.
  • IV.—The 20th of June.
  • CHAPTER VI. THE BIRTH OF THE TERRIBLE PARIS COMMUNE.
  • I.—Indignation of the Constitutionalists.
  • II.—Pressure on the King.
  • III.—The Girondins have worked for the benefit of the Jacobins.
  • IV.—Vain attempts of the Girondins to put it down.
  • V.—Evening of August 8.
  • VI.—Nights of August 9 and 10.
  • VII.—August 10.
  • VIII.—State of Paris in the Interregnum.
  • BOOK THIRD. THE SECOND STAGE OF THE CONQUEST.
  • CHAPTER I.
  • I.—Government by gangs in times of anarchy.
  • II.—The development of the ideas of killings in the mass of the party.
  • III. Terror is their Salvation.
  • IV.—Date of the determination of this.—The actors and their parts.
  • V. Abasement and Stupor.
  • VI. Jacobin Massacre.
  • CHAPTER II. THE DEPARTMENTS.
  • I. The Sovereignty of the People.
  • II.—In several departments it establishes itself in advance.
  • III.—Each Jacobin band a dictator in its own neighborhood.
  • IV.—Ordinary practices of the Jacobin dictatorship.
  • V.—The companies of traveling volunteers.
  • VI.—A tour of France in the cabinet of the Minister of the Interior.
  • CHAPTER III.
  • I.—The second stage of the Jacobin conquest.
  • II.—The elections.
  • III.—Composition and tone of the secondary assemblies.
  • IV.—Composition of the National Convention.
  • V.—The Jacobins forming alone the Sovereign People.
  • VI.—Composition of the party.
  • VII. The Jacobin Chieftains.
  • CHAPTER IV. PRECARIOUS SITUATION OF A CENTRAL GOVERNMENT LOCKED UP WITHIN A LOCAL JURISDICTION.
  • I.—Jacobin advantages.
  • II.—Its parliamentary recruits.
  • III. Physical fear and moral cowardice.
  • IV. Jacobin victory over Girondin majority.
  • V. Jacobin violence against the people.
  • VI. Jacobin tactics.
  • VII. The central Jacobin committee in power.
  • VIII. Right or Wrong, my Country.
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