History of English Literature Volume 2 (of 3)
Free

History of English Literature Volume 2 (of 3)

By Hippolyte Taine
Free
Book Description
Table of Contents
  • #THE WORLD'S# GREAT CLASSICS
  • LIBRARY COMMITTEE
    • TIMOTHY DWIGHT, D.D. LLD. RICHARD HENRY STODDARD ARTHUR RICHMOND MARSH. A.B. PAVL VAN DYKE, D.D. ALBERT ELLERY BERGH
      • •ILLUSTRATED•WITH•NEARLY•TWO• •HUNDRED•PHOTOGRAVURES•ETCHINGS• •COLORED•PLATES•AND•FULL• •PAGE•PORTRAITS•OF•GREAT•AUTHORS•
  • HISTORY OF
  • ENGLISH LITERATURE
    • HIPPOLYTE ADOLPHE TAINE
      • TRANSLATED FROM THE FRENCH BY HENRY VAN LAUN
      • WITH A SPECIAL INTRODUCTION BY
      • J. SCOTT CLARK, A. M.
  • CONTENTS
    • BOOK II—THE RENAISSANCE
    • (CONTINUED)
      • CHAPTER FIFTH The Christian Renaissance
      • CHAPTER SIXTH Milton
    • BOOK III.—THE CLASSIC AGE
      • CHAPTER FIRST The Restoration
      • CHAPTER SECOND Dryden
      • CHAPTER THIRD The Revolution
      • CHAPTER FOURTH Addison
      • CHAPTER FIFTH Swift
      • CHAPTER SIXTH The Novelists
  • ILLUSTRATIONS
    • BOOK II.—THE RENAISSANCE (Continued)
    • HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE
      • CHAPTER FIFTH
      • The Christian Renaissance
      • Section I.—Decay of the Southern Civilizations
      • Section II.—Luther and the Reformation in Germany
      • Section III.—The Reformation in England
      • Section IV.—The Anglicans
      • Section V.—The Puritans
      • Section VI.—John Bunyan
      • CHAPTER SIXTH
      • Milton
      • Section I.—Milton's Family and Education
      • Section II.—Milton's Unhappy Domestic Life
      • Section III.—Milton's Combative Energy
      • Section IV.—Milton's Personal Appearance
      • Section V.—Milton as a Prose Writer
      • Section VI.—Milton as a Poet
      • BOOK III.—THE CLASSIC AGE
      • CHAPTER FIRST
      • The Restoration
      • Part I.—The Roisterers
      • Section I.—The Excesses of Puritanism
      • Section II.—A Frenchman's View of the Manners of the Time
      • Section III.—Butler's Hudibras
      • Section IV.—Morals of the Court
      • Section V.—Method and Style of Hobbes
      • Section VI.—The Theatre
      • Section VII.—Dryden and the Drama
      • Section VIII.—Wycherley
      • Part II—The Worldlings
      • Section I.—Court Life in Europe
      • Section II.—Dawn of the Classic Spirit
      • Section III.—Sir William Temple
      • Section IV.—Writers à la Mode
      • Section V.—Sir John Denham
      • Section VI.—Wycherley, Congreve, Vanbrugh and Farquhar
      • Section VII.—Superficiality Of English Comedy
      • Section VIII.—Natural Characters
      • Section IX.—Artificial Characters
      • Section X.—Sheridan.—Decadence of the Theatre
      • CHAPTER SECOND
      • Dryden
      • Section I.—Dryden's Début
      • Section II.—Dryden's Family and Education
      • Section III.—Dramatic Theories of Dryden
      • Section IV.—The Style of Dryden's Plays
      • Section V.—His Merit as a Dramatist
      • Section VI.—His Prose Style
      • Section VII.—How Literature in England is Occupied with Politics and Religion
      • Section VIII.—Development of the Art of Writing
      • Section IX.—Dryden's Translations and Adaptations.—His Occasional Soul—Stirring Verses
      • Section X.—Misfortunes of Dryden's Old Age
      • CHAPTER THIRD
      • The Revolution
      • Section I.—The Moral Revolution
      • Section II.—Brutality of the People.—Private Morals.—Chesterfield and Gay
      • Section III.—Principles of Civilization in France and England
      • Section IV.—Religion
      • Section V.—The Pulpit
      • Section VI.—Theology
      • Section VII.—The Constitution.—Locke's Theory of Government
      • Section VIII.—Parliamentary Orators
      • Section IX.—Doctrines of the French Revolution Contrasted with the Conservative Tendencies of the English People
      • CHAPTER FOURTH
      • Addison
      • Section I.—The Significance of the Writings of Addison and Swift
      • Section II.—Addison's Character and Education
      • Section III.—Addison's Seriousness.—His Nobility of Character
      • Section IV.—The Morality of Addison's Essays
      • Section V.—How Addison made Morality Fashionable.—Characteristics of His Style
      • Section VI.—Addison's Gallantry.—His Humor.—Sir Roger de Coverley.—The Vision of Mirza
      • CHAPTER FIFTH
      • Swift
      • Section I.—Concerning Swift's Life and Character
      • Section II.—Swift's Prosaic and Positive Mind
      • Section III.—Swift as a Political Pamphleteer
      • Section IV.—Swift as a Humorist.—As a Poet
      • Section V.—Swift as a Narrator and Philosopher
      • CHAPTER SIXTH
      • The Novelists
      • Section I.—The Anti-Romantic Novel
      • Section II.—Daniel De Foe
      • Section III—The Evolution of the Eighteenth Century Novel
      • Section IV.—Samuel Richardson
      • Section V.—Henry Fielding
      • Section VI.—Tobias Smollett
      • Section VII.—Laurence Sterne
      • Section VIII.—Oliver Goldsmith
      • Section IX.—Samuel Johnson
      • Section X.—William Hogarth
      • INDEX
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