Das Architekten- und Designer-Ehepaar Jacques und Jacqueline Groag
Free

Das Architekten- und Designer-Ehepaar Jacques und Jacqueline Groag

By Ursula Prokop
Free
Book Description

This manuscript is based on the results of a research project (No. 7726), carried out at the Institute for the History of Art (University of Vienna) under the direction of Professor Dr. Peter Haiko, and sponsored by the Jubilee Funds of the Austrian National Bank.The artists Jacques Groag (b. Olomouc, February 5, 1892, d. London, January 26, 1962) and his wife Jacqueline (née Hilde Blumberger, b.Prague, April 6, 1903, d. London, January 13, 1986) belong to those representatives of the Viennese Modernists between the two World Wars who are now forgotten, due to the fact that, being Jews, they were forced to emigrate in 1938. In the early phase of his career Jacques Groag worked as an assistant and executing architect for Adolf Loos (Moller house, 1927) and Ludwig Wittgenstein (Wittgenstein house, 1928) and co-operated with the interior designers Friedl Dicker and Franz Singer (Heller tennis club house, 1928). After that, in independent practice he realized a considerable number of remarkable architectural projects in Vienna and native Moravia (now Czech Republic), among others a pair of semi-detached houses at the Werkbundsiedlung, a house for the actress Paula Wessely, a country house for the industrialist Otto Eisler, several houses for other private clients, but also industrial buildings. At this time he was regarded as one of the most important followers of Adolf Loos. He also enjoyed remarkable success as a designer of interiors, and was befriended to many Viennese artists such as the painters Sergius Pauser and Josef Dobrowsky, the sculptor Georg Ehrlich and the photographer Trude Fleischmann. His wife Jacqueline, a student of Franz Cizek and Josef Hoffmann at the Wiener Kunstgewerbeschule, between the wars was active as a designer of textiles for the Wiener Werkstätte and for fashion houses in Paris. After the couple's emigration to England in 1939 Jacques Groag could only find commissions as a designer of interiors and furniture, but found no opportunity to realize architectural projects. As a team, Jacques and Jacqueline made important contributions to prominent exhibitions on British design in the post-war period. Jacqueline, who outlived her husband for more than twenty years, continued her career as a successful textile designer until her late age.

Diese Arbeit basiert auf dem vom Jubiläumsfond der Österreichischen Nationalbank geförderten Forschungsprojekt Nr. 7726 des Institutes für Kunstgeschichte d. Universität/Wien, unter Leitung von Prof. Dr. Peter HaikoDas Künstlerehepaar Jacques ( *5.2.1892/Olmütz - † 26.1.1962/London) und Jacqueline Groag (recte Hilde Blumberger, *6.4.1903/Prag - †13.1.1986/London) gehört aufgrund des Umstandes, daß sie 1938 als Juden emigrieren mußten, heute zu den vergessenen Vertretern der Wiener Moderne der Zwischenkriegszeit. Der Architekt Jacques Groag, zu Beginn seiner Karriere Mitarbeiter von Adolf Loos (Villa Moller/1927) , Ludwig Wittgenstein (Haus Wittgenstein/1928) und den Innenarchitekten Friedl Dicker/Franz Singer (Clubhaus Heller/1928), realisierte zahlreiche bemerkenswerte Projekte in Wien und Mähren (u. a. ein Doppelhaus der Werkbundsiedlung, Villa Paula Wessely, Landhaus Eisler, diverse Einfamilienhäuser und Industrieprojekte ) und galt seinerzeit als einer der bedeutendsten Schüler von Adolf Loos. Groag war insbesondere auch auf dem Gebiet der Innenarchitektur sehr erfolgreich und war mit zahlreichen Wiener Künstlern (Sergius Pauser, Josef Dobrowsky, Georg Ehrlich, Trude Fleischmann) befreundet. Seine Frau Jacqueline Groag, eine Schülerin von Franz Cizek und Josef Hoffmann an der Kunstgewerbeschule/Wien, war in der Zwischenkriegszeit als Textildesignerin für die Wiener Werkstätte und namhafte Pariser Modehäuser tätig. Nach der Emigration nach England 1939 konnte Jacques Groag seinen Beruf jedoch nur mehr als Innenarchitekt und Möbeldesigner ausüben, Architekturaufträge blieben aus. Dahingegen wurde Jacqueline Groag mit ihren auf der Ästhetik der Wiener Werkstätte basierenden Stoff - und Tapetenentwürfen zu einer der führenden und einflußreichsten Designerinnen der Nachkriegszeit in England (u. a. Modellkleid für Queen Elizabeth, Aufträge für Bahn - und Schiffahrtslinien). Das Ehepaar hatte als Designerteam auch an mehreren großen britischen Ausstellungen der Nachkriegszeit mitgewirkt. Jacqueline Groag, die ihren Mann um rund zwanzig Jahre überlebte, war bis in ihr hohes Alter erfolgreich tätig.

Table of Contents
  • 0001
  • 0002
  • 0003
  • 0004
  • 0005
  • 0006
  • 0007
  • 0008
  • 0009
  • 0010
  • 0011
  • 0012
  • 0013
  • 0014
  • 0015
  • 0016
  • 0017
  • 0018
  • 0019
  • 0020
  • 0021
  • 0022
  • 0023
  • 0024
  • 0025
  • 0026
  • 0027
  • 0028
  • 0029
  • 0030
  • 0031
  • 0032
  • 0033
  • 0034
  • 0035
  • 0036
  • 0037
  • 0038
  • 0039
  • 0040
  • 0041
  • 0042
  • 0043
  • 0044
  • 0045
  • 0046
  • 0047
  • 0048
  • 0049
  • 0050
  • 0051
  • 0052
  • 0053
  • 0054
  • 0055
  • 0056
  • 0057
  • 0058
  • 0059
  • 0060
  • 0061
  • 0062
  • 0063
  • 0064
  • 0065
  • 0066
  • 0067
  • 0068
  • 0069
  • 0070
  • 0071
  • 0072
  • 0073
  • 0074
  • 0075
  • 0076
  • 0077
  • 0078
  • 0079
  • 0080
  • 0081
  • 0082
  • 0083
  • 0084
  • 0085
  • 0086
  • 0087
  • 0088
  • 0089
  • 0090
  • 0091
  • 0092
  • 0093
  • 0094
  • 0095
  • 0096
  • 0097
  • 0098
  • 0099
  • 0100
  • 0101
  • 0102
  • 0103
  • 0104
  • 0105
  • 0106
  • 0107
  • 0108
  • 0109
  • 0110
  • 0111
  • 0112
  • 0113
  • 0114
  • 0115
  • 0116
  • 0117
  • 0118
  • 0119
  • 0120
  • 0121
  • 0122
  • 0123
  • 0124
  • 0125
  • 0126
  • 0127
  • 0128
  • 0129
  • 0130
  • 0131
  • 0132
  • 0133
  • 0134
  • 0135
  • 0136
  • 0137
  • 0138
  • 0139
  • 0140
  • 0141
  • 0142
  • 0143
  • 0144
  • 0145
  • 0146
  • 0147
  • 0148
  • 0149
  • 0150
  • 0151
  • 0152
  • 0153
  • 0154
  • 0155
  • 0156
  • 0157
  • 0158
  • 0159
  • 0160
  • 0161
  • 0162
  • 0163
  • 0164
  • 0165
  • 0166
  • 0167
  • 0168
  • 0169
  • 0170
  • 0171
  • 0172
  • 0173
  • 0174
    No review for this book yet, be the first to review.
      No comment for this book yet, be the first to comment
      You May Also Like
      Rudolf Perco, 1884-1942
      Free
      Rudolf Perco, 1884-1942
      By Ursula Prokop
      Also Available On
      App store smallGoogle play small
      Categories
      Curated Lists
      • Pattern Recognition and Machine Learning (Information Science and Statistics)
        by Christopher M. Bishop
        Data mining
        by I. H. Witten
        The Elements of Statistical Learning: Data Mining, Inference, and Prediction
        by Various
        See more...
      • CK-12 Chemistry
        by Various
        Concept Development Studies in Chemistry
        by John Hutchinson
        An Introduction to Chemistry - Atoms First
        by Mark Bishop
        See more...
      • Microsoft Word - How to Use Advanced Algebra II.doc
        by Jonathan Emmons
        Advanced Algebra II: Activities and Homework
        by Kenny Felder
        de2de
        by
        See more...
      • The Sun Who Lost His Way
        by
        Tania is a Detective
        by Kanika G
        Firenze_s-Light
        by
        See more...
      • Java 3D Programming
        by Daniel Selman
        The Java EE 6 Tutorial
        by Oracle Corporation
        JavaKid811
        by
        See more...