A Source Book in American History to 1787
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A Source Book in American History to 1787

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Table of Contents
  • A SOURCE BOOK IN AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1787
  • FOREWORD
  • TABLE OF CONTENTS
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • I. ENGLAND IN THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY
      • 1. Classes of Englishmen
    • 1. Classes of Englishmen
  • A. SOUTHERN COLONIES TO 1660
    • II. MOTIVES FOR EARLY ENGLISH COLONIZATION
      • 2. From Sir George Peckham's "True Report"
      • 3. A Discourse on Western Planting by Richard Hakluyt, 1584
      • 4. Drayton's Ode to the Virginian Voyage
      • 5. Goodspeed to Virginia, 1609
      • 6. Nova Britannia, 1609
      • 7. Statement of the Virginia Company, 1609
      • 8. Marston's "Eastward Hoe"
      • 9. Crashaw's "Daily Prayer"
      • 10. Crashaw's Sermon, March 3/13, 1609/10
      • 11. Sir Edwin Sandys, 1612
      • 12. Governor Dale to the London Company, 1613
      • 13. The London Company not Mercenary
      • 14. John Smith's Last Plea for Colonization, 1631
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • 2. From Sir George Peckham's "True Report"
    • 3. A Discourse on Western Planting by Richard Hakluyt, 1584
    • 4. Drayton's Ode to the Virginian Voyage
    • 5. Goodspeed to Virginia, 1609
    • 6. Nova Britannia, 1609
    • 7. Statement of the Virginia Company, 1609
    • 8. Marston's "Eastward Hoe"
    • 9. Crashaw's "Daily Prayer"
    • 10. Crashaw's Sermon, March 3/13, 1609/10
    • 11. Sir Edwin Sandys, 1612
    • 12. Governor Dale to the London Company, 1613
    • 13. The London Company not Mercenary
    • 14. John Smith's Last Plea for Colonization, 1631
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • III. ILLUSTRATIVE OF VIRGINIA HISTORY TO THE INTRODUCTION OF SELF-GOVERNMENT (1606-1619)
      • 15. The Gilbert and Raleigh Charters
      • 16. First Charter for Colonizing Virginia; April 10/20,[5] 1606
      • 17. Instructions issued by King James
      • 18. Instructions by the Council in England to the Expedition to Virginia; December, 1606
      • 19. Exploration and Sufferings
      • 20. Second Charter of Virginia; May 23/June 2, 1609
      • 21. Third Charter for Virginia. March 12/22, 1611/1612[9]
      • 22. Danger from Spanish Attack (1607-1614)
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • 15. The Gilbert and Raleigh Charters
    • 16. First Charter for Colonizing Virginia; April 10/20,[5] 1606
    • 17. Instructions issued by King James
    • 18. Instructions by the Council in England to the Expedition to Virginia; December, 1606
    • 19. Exploration and Sufferings
    • 20. Second Charter of Virginia; May 23/June 2, 1609
    • 21. Third Charter for Virginia. March 12/22, 1611/1612[9]
    • 22. Danger from Spanish Attack (1607-1614)
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • IV. THE LIBERAL LONDON COMPANY AND SELF-GOVERNMENT IN VIRGINIA (1619-1624)
      • 23. From the Rules of the Virginia Company in London
      • 24. An Order of the London Company as to Self-government February 2/12, 1619/20
      • 25. The First Representative Assembly in America July 30/August 9, 1619
      • 26. The London Company's "Declaration," June, 1620
      • 27. The Ordinance of 1621 for Virginia
      • 28. Royal Attempts to Control the Company, 1620-1622
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • 23. From the Rules of the Virginia Company in London
    • 24. An Order of the London Company as to Self-government February 2/12, 1619/20
    • 25. The First Representative Assembly in America July 30/August 9, 1619
    • 26. The London Company's "Declaration," June, 1620
    • 27. The Ordinance of 1621 for Virginia
    • 28. Royal Attempts to Control the Company, 1620-1622
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • V. A ROYAL PROVINCE
      • 29. The Royal Commission of 1624 for the First Royal Governor in Virginia
      • 30. Yeardley's Commission from Charles I, March 4/14, 1624/5
      • 31. The Colony favors the Policy of the Company
      • 32. Royal Restoration of the Virginia Assembly, 1629
      • 33. Legislation by the Virginia Assembly as to Morals and Taxes
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • 29. The Royal Commission of 1624 for the First Royal Governor in Virginia
    • 30. Yeardley's Commission from Charles I, March 4/14, 1624/5
    • 31. The Colony favors the Policy of the Company
    • 32. Royal Restoration of the Virginia Assembly, 1629
    • 33. Legislation by the Virginia Assembly as to Morals and Taxes
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • VI. THE ASSEMBLY DURING THE COMMONWEALTH
      • 34. Virginia and the Parliamentary Commissioners, 1652
      • 35. The Franchise Restricted and Restored, 1655, 1656
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • 34. Virginia and the Parliamentary Commissioners, 1652
    • 35. The Franchise Restricted and Restored, 1655, 1656
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • VII. MARYLAND
      • 36. Lord Baltimore to King Charles, August 19/29, 1629
      • 37. Charter of Maryland, June 20/30, 1632
      • 38. Comment on the Avalon Charter of 1623
      • 39. Excursus: Charters for New Albion and Maine
      • 40. The Maryland Toleration Act of 1649
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • 36. Lord Baltimore to King Charles, August 19/29, 1629
    • 37. Charter of Maryland, June 20/30, 1632
    • 38. Comment on the Avalon Charter of 1623
    • 39. Excursus: Charters for New Albion and Maine
    • 40. The Maryland Toleration Act of 1649
    • FOOTNOTES:
  • B. NEW ENGLAND TO 1660
    • VIII. AN EARLY EXPLORATION IN MAINE
      • 41. Weymouth's Voyage, 1605
    • 41. Weymouth's Voyage, 1605
    • IX. THE FIRST SOURCE OF LAND TITLES IN NEW ENGLAND
      • 42. Charter of the Plymouth Council
    • 42. Charter of the Plymouth Council
    • X. PLYMOUTH PLANTATION
      • 43. Delays in securing the Wincob Charter Robert Cushman to Pastor Robinson, May 8/18, 1619
      • 44. Agreement between the Pilgrims in Holland and the Merchant Adventurers in London
      • 45. From the Farewell Letter of John Robinson
      • 46. The Mayflower Compact
      • 47. The Peirce Charter, June, 1621
      • 48. Early Descriptions of Plymouth[30]
      • 49. Final Source of Plymouth Land Titles
      • 50. First Code of Laws in America
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • 43. Delays in securing the Wincob Charter Robert Cushman to Pastor Robinson, May 8/18, 1619
    • 44. Agreement between the Pilgrims in Holland and the Merchant Adventurers in London
    • 45. From the Farewell Letter of John Robinson
    • 46. The Mayflower Compact
    • 47. The Peirce Charter, June, 1621
    • 48. Early Descriptions of Plymouth[30]
    • 49. Final Source of Plymouth Land Titles
    • 50. First Code of Laws in America
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • XI. THE FOUNDING OF MASSACHUSETTS
      • 51. The Gorges Claim to Massachusetts
      • 52. The Beginning of Salem Colony
      • 53. The First Charter for Massachusetts Bay
      • 54. Docket of the Massachusetts Charter, 1629
      • 55. Excursus: For a Comparative Study of Charters
      • 56. The Massachusetts Company's Agreement with Mr. Higginson
      • 57. First Government in Massachusetts Bay under the Company in England; April, 1629
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • 51. The Gorges Claim to Massachusetts
    • 52. The Beginning of Salem Colony
    • 53. The First Charter for Massachusetts Bay
    • 54. Docket of the Massachusetts Charter, 1629
    • 55. Excursus: For a Comparative Study of Charters
    • 56. The Massachusetts Company's Agreement with Mr. Higginson
    • 57. First Government in Massachusetts Bay under the Company in England; April, 1629
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • XII. THE COLONY BECOMES A PURITAN ENTERPRISE
      • 58. Decision to Transfer the Charter to the Colony
      • 59. Decision of Puritan Gentlemen to Settle in the Colony[39]
      • 60. Early Attitude of the Puritan Colony to the Church of England
      • 61. Political Principles of the Puritans
      • 62. Early Hardships and Religious Matters, 1630-1631
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • 58. Decision to Transfer the Charter to the Colony
    • 59. Decision of Puritan Gentlemen to Settle in the Colony[39]
    • 60. Early Attitude of the Puritan Colony to the Church of England
    • 61. Political Principles of the Puritans
    • 62. Early Hardships and Religious Matters, 1630-1631
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • XIII. DEVELOPMENT OF DEMOCRACY, 1630-1644
      • 63. The Oligarchic Usurpation
      • 64. The First "Popular" Movement—Watertown Protest, 1632
      • 65. Legislation and Administration by the "Assistants," 1630-1633
      • 66. The Beginning of Town Government in Massachusetts, 1633
      • 67. Representative Central Government Established, 1634
      • 68. Reaction: The Aristocratic Veto
      • 69. Right of Free Speech Denied
      • 70. Formal Adoption of the Ballot in Elections in the General Court
      • 71. Secret Ballot in a Local Election, because of Democratic and Aristocratic Jealousies
      • 72. Martial Law
      • 73. Life Council; Proxies; "Approved" Churches
      • 74. The Wheelwright Controversy (Political Aspects)
      • 75. Political and Social Conditions in New England before 1660
      • 76. Some Relations with England, 1638
      • 77. Democratic Discontent, 1639
      • 78. The Body of Liberties, 1641
      • 79. A Puritan View of Trade
      • 80. The Separation of the Legislature into Two Houses
      • 81. A Town Code of School Law
      • 82. Colonial School Laws
      • 83. Representative Town Records
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • 63. The Oligarchic Usurpation
    • 64. The First "Popular" Movement—Watertown Protest, 1632
    • 65. Legislation and Administration by the "Assistants," 1630-1633
    • 66. The Beginning of Town Government in Massachusetts, 1633
    • 67. Representative Central Government Established, 1634
    • 68. Reaction: The Aristocratic Veto
    • 69. Right of Free Speech Denied
    • 70. Formal Adoption of the Ballot in Elections in the General Court
    • 71. Secret Ballot in a Local Election, because of Democratic and Aristocratic Jealousies
    • 72. Martial Law
    • 73. Life Council; Proxies; "Approved" Churches
    • 74. The Wheelwright Controversy (Political Aspects)
    • 75. Political and Social Conditions in New England before 1660
    • 76. Some Relations with England, 1638
    • 77. Democratic Discontent, 1639
    • 78. The Body of Liberties, 1641
    • 79. A Puritan View of Trade
    • 80. The Separation of the Legislature into Two Houses
    • 81. A Town Code of School Law
    • 82. Colonial School Laws
    • 83. Representative Town Records
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • XIV. MASSACHUSETTS AND PERSECUTION
      • 84. Puritan Arguments for and against Persecution
      • 85. Criticism by a Moderate Episcopalian and Monarchist
      • 86. A Presbyterian Demand for the Franchise, 1646
      • 87. Punishment for not Attending "Approved" Churches, 1666
      • 88. Quaker Persecutions
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • 84. Puritan Arguments for and against Persecution
    • 85. Criticism by a Moderate Episcopalian and Monarchist
    • 86. A Presbyterian Demand for the Franchise, 1646
    • 87. Punishment for not Attending "Approved" Churches, 1666
    • 88. Quaker Persecutions
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • XV. RHODE ISLAND TO 1660
      • 89. A Compact in Civil Things Only, 1336(?)
      • 90. Religious Freedom Consonant with Civil Order
      • 91. Patent of Providence Plantations, March 14/24, 1643/1644
      • 92. Rhode Island and the Quakers, 1657
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • 89. A Compact in Civil Things Only, 1336(?)
    • 90. Religious Freedom Consonant with Civil Order
    • 91. Patent of Providence Plantations, March 14/24, 1643/1644
    • 92. Rhode Island and the Quakers, 1657
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • XVI. CONNECTICUT BEFORE 1660
      • 93. The Fundamental Orders of 1639
    • 93. The Fundamental Orders of 1639
    • XVII. THE NEW ENGLAND CONFEDERATION
      • 94. The Constitution
      • 95. Massachusetts Demands More Weight
      • 96. Nullification by Massachusetts
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • 94. The Constitution
    • 95. Massachusetts Demands More Weight
    • 96. Nullification by Massachusetts
    • FOOTNOTES:
  • C. COLONIAL AMERICA, 1660-1760
    • XVIII. LIBERAL CHARTERS, 1662, 1663[89]
      • 97. The Connecticut Charter
      • 98. The Rhode Island Charter
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • 97. The Connecticut Charter
    • 98. The Rhode Island Charter
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • XIX. AN ENGLISH COLONIAL SYSTEM
      • 99. Instructions for the Councill oppointed for Forraigne Plantations (1660) by Charles II
      • 100. The Commercial Policy
      • 101. The Duke of York's Charter for New York, March 12/22, 1663/4
      • 102. Penn's Grant of Pennsylvania, March 4/14, 1680/88
      • 103. Penn's Grants to the Pennsylvanians
      • 104. Berkeley's Report on Virginia, 1671
      • 105. The Franchise in Virginia again Restricted[108]
      • 106. "Bacon's Laws," in Virginia (Political Discontent)
      • 107. Bacon's Proclamation, July 30, 1676
      • 108. Testimony of Political Discontent as a Cause of Bacon's Rebellion
      • 109. Abolition of Bacon's Reforms for Virginia
      • 110. Self-government in Massachusetts Decreased
      • 111. Attempts by England at Closer Control after 1700
      • 112. Commission of a Royal Governor
      • 113. Free Speech Vindicated
      • 114. Franklin's "Albany Plan," July 10, 1754[113]
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • 99. Instructions for the Councill oppointed for Forraigne Plantations (1660) by Charles II
    • 100. The Commercial Policy
    • 101. The Duke of York's Charter for New York, March 12/22, 1663/4
    • 102. Penn's Grant of Pennsylvania, March 4/14, 1680/88
    • 103. Penn's Grants to the Pennsylvanians
    • 104. Berkeley's Report on Virginia, 1671
    • 105. The Franchise in Virginia again Restricted[108]
    • 106. "Bacon's Laws," in Virginia (Political Discontent)
    • 107. Bacon's Proclamation, July 30, 1676
    • 108. Testimony of Political Discontent as a Cause of Bacon's Rebellion
    • 109. Abolition of Bacon's Reforms for Virginia
    • 110. Self-government in Massachusetts Decreased
    • 111. Attempts by England at Closer Control after 1700
    • 112. Commission of a Royal Governor
    • 113. Free Speech Vindicated
    • 114. Franklin's "Albany Plan," July 10, 1754[113]
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • XX. HARSH PHASES OF COLONIAL SOCIETY[117]
      • 115. Legal Punishment in Virginia, 1662-1748
      • 116. White Servants in 1774
      • 117. Runaway Servants and Apprentices
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • 115. Legal Punishment in Virginia, 1662-1748
    • 116. White Servants in 1774
    • 117. Runaway Servants and Apprentices
    • FOOTNOTES:
  • D. THE REVOLUTION
    • XXI. PRELIMINARY PERIOD—TO 1774
      • 118. Sugar Act of 1764
      • 119. Stamp Act
      • 120. Reception of the Stamp Act in America
      • 121. Origin of the Virginia Non-importation Agreement
      • 122. The Origin of Massachusetts Town-Committees of Correspondence, 1772
      • 123. Creation of Standing Intercolonial Committees of Correspondence, 1773
      • 124. Tea Riots
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • 118. Sugar Act of 1764
    • 119. Stamp Act
    • 120. Reception of the Stamp Act in America
    • 121. Origin of the Virginia Non-importation Agreement
    • 122. The Origin of Massachusetts Town-Committees of Correspondence, 1772
    • 123. Creation of Standing Intercolonial Committees of Correspondence, 1773
    • 124. Tea Riots
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • XXII. RISE OF REVOLUTIONARY GOVERNMENTS
      • 125. The Virginia Burgesses suggest an Annual Continental Congress
      • 126. Another "Call" for the Continental Congress
      • 127. A Virginia County Suggests a Continental Congress and a General Association
      • 128. The First Call for a Provincial Convention (Virginia)
      • 129. Typical Virginia County Instructions to Delegates to the First Provincial Convention
      • 130. The First Continental Congress
      • 131. Prince William County (Virginia) Committee, Approval of the Association
      • 132. Virginia County "Conventions" become De Facto Governments
      • 133. Virginia Provincial Conventions become Governments
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • 125. The Virginia Burgesses suggest an Annual Continental Congress
    • 126. Another "Call" for the Continental Congress
    • 127. A Virginia County Suggests a Continental Congress and a General Association
    • 128. The First Call for a Provincial Convention (Virginia)
    • 129. Typical Virginia County Instructions to Delegates to the First Provincial Convention
    • 130. The First Continental Congress
    • 131. Prince William County (Virginia) Committee, Approval of the Association
    • 132. Virginia County "Conventions" become De Facto Governments
    • 133. Virginia Provincial Conventions become Governments
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • XXIII. INDEPENDENCE
      • 134. Virginia County Instructions for Independence, April 23, 1776
      • 135. Instructions for Independence in the Virginia Convention (and Resolutions for an Independent State Government), May 15, 1776[130]
      • 136. The Virginia Bill of Rights, June 12, 1776
      • 137. The First Declaration of Independence by a State
      • 138. Revolutionary State Governments
      • 139. Instructions by "State" Conventions against Independence (January-May, 1776)
      • 140. Motion in Congress for Independence
      • 141. The Continental Declaration of Independence
      • 142. Anti-Social Tendencies of the Pre-Revolutionary Measures
      • 143. An Oath of Allegiance to a New State, 1777
      • 144. A Loyalist's Suggestion of the Danger to American Liberty in the French Alliance, 1779
      • 145. How the Revolution set free Social Forces
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • 134. Virginia County Instructions for Independence, April 23, 1776
    • 135. Instructions for Independence in the Virginia Convention (and Resolutions for an Independent State Government), May 15, 1776[130]
    • 136. The Virginia Bill of Rights, June 12, 1776
    • 137. The First Declaration of Independence by a State
    • 138. Revolutionary State Governments
    • 139. Instructions by "State" Conventions against Independence (January-May, 1776)
    • 140. Motion in Congress for Independence
    • 141. The Continental Declaration of Independence
    • 142. Anti-Social Tendencies of the Pre-Revolutionary Measures
    • 143. An Oath of Allegiance to a New State, 1777
    • 144. A Loyalist's Suggestion of the Danger to American Liberty in the French Alliance, 1779
    • 145. How the Revolution set free Social Forces
    • FOOTNOTES:
  • E. CONFEDERATION AND CONSTITUTION
    • XXIV. THE ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION
      • 146. Debates in the Continental Congress on the Articles of Confederation
      • 147. Articles of Confederation.
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • 146. Debates in the Continental Congress on the Articles of Confederation
    • 147. Articles of Confederation.
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • XXV. THE NATIONAL DOMAIN
      • 148. Desire for Statehood; Self-confidence of the West
      • 149. Organization by Congress
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • 148. Desire for Statehood; Self-confidence of the West
    • 149. Organization by Congress
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • XXVI. DRIFTING TOWARD ANARCHY
      • 150. Danger (or Hope) of a Military Dictator (1783)
      • 151. Shays' Rebellion
      • 152. A Shrewd Foreign Observer's View of the Social Conflict over the Adoption of a New Constitution
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • 150. Danger (or Hope) of a Military Dictator (1783)
    • 151. Shays' Rebellion
    • 152. A Shrewd Foreign Observer's View of the Social Conflict over the Adoption of a New Constitution
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • XXVII. MAKING THE CONSTITUTION
      • 153. Call issued by the Annapolis Convention
      • 154. Appointment of Delegates: Credentials (Georgia)
      • 155. George Mason on the Preliminaries at Philadelphia
      • 156. The Virginia Plan
      • 157. George Mason on the Convention and its Aristocratic Tendencies (June, 1787)
      • 158. The New Jersey Plan
      • 159. Hamilton's Plan
      • 160. Character Sketches of Delegates by William Pierce
      • 161. One Day in the Philadelphia Convention
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • 153. Call issued by the Annapolis Convention
    • 154. Appointment of Delegates: Credentials (Georgia)
    • 155. George Mason on the Preliminaries at Philadelphia
    • 156. The Virginia Plan
    • 157. George Mason on the Convention and its Aristocratic Tendencies (June, 1787)
    • 158. The New Jersey Plan
    • 159. Hamilton's Plan
    • 160. Character Sketches of Delegates by William Pierce
    • 161. One Day in the Philadelphia Convention
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • XXVIII. RATIFYING THE CONSTITUTION[157]
      • 162. George Mason's Objections to the Constitution, 1787
      • 163. Mason's Explanation of the Preparation of his "Objections" (and Accusation of "Railroading" through the Plan of the Majority)
      • 164. An Unfriendly Account of Hancock's Support of the Constitution in the Massachusetts Ratifying Convention of 1788
      • 165. The Federal Constitution
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • 162. George Mason's Objections to the Constitution, 1787
    • 163. Mason's Explanation of the Preparation of his "Objections" (and Accusation of "Railroading" through the Plan of the Majority)
    • 164. An Unfriendly Account of Hancock's Support of the Constitution in the Massachusetts Ratifying Convention of 1788
    • 165. The Federal Constitution
    • FOOTNOTES:
  • INDEX OF SOURCES
  • SUBJECT INDEX
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