The Cook's Oracle; and Housekeeper's Manual
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The Cook's Oracle; and Housekeeper's Manual

By William Kitchiner
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Book Description
Table of Contents
  • THE COOK’S ORACLE; AND HOUSEKEEPER’S MANUAL.
  • ADVERTISEMENT.
  • PREFACE TO THE SEVENTH EDITION.
  • PREFACE.
  • CONTENTS.
  • INTRODUCTION.
    • CULINARY CURIOSITIES.
  • INVITATIONS TO DINNER
    • MANNERS MAKE THE MAN.
    • CARVING.
  • FRIENDLY ADVICE TO COOKS,46-* AND OTHER SERVANTS
    • Giving away Victuals.
    • Chacun à son goût.
  • TABLE OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES.
  • RUDIMENTS OF COOKERY.
  • CHAPTER I. BOILING.66-*
    • The sauces usually sent to table with boiled meat, &c.
    • BAKING.
  • CHAPTER II. ROASTING.
    • DREDGINGS.
    • BASTINGS.
  • CHAPTER III. FRYING.
  • CHAPTER IV. BROILING.
  • CHAPTER V. VEGETABLES.
  • CHAPTER VI. FISH.
    • FISH SAUCES.
  • CHAPTER VII. BROTHS AND SOUPS.
    • BROTH HERBS, SOUP ROOTS, AND SEASONINGS.
    • The crafte to make ypocras.
  • CHAPTER VIII. GRAVIES AND SAUCES.
    • To make bottle-cement.
  • CHAPTER IX. MADE DISHES.
  • THE COOK’S ORACLE.
  • BOILING.
    • Leg of Mutton.—(No. 1.)
    • Neck of Mutton.—(No. 2.)
    • Lamb.—(No. 3.)
    • Veal.—(No. 4.)
    • Beef bouilli,—(No. 5.)
    • To salt Meat.—(No. 6.)
    • To pickle Meat.
    • A Round of salted Beef.—(No. 7.)
    • H-Bone of Beef,—(No. 8.)
    • Ribs of Beef salted and rolled.—(No. 9.)
    • Half a Calf’s Head.—(No. 10.)
    • Pickled Pork,—(No. 11.)
    • Pettitoes, or Sucking-Pig’s Feet.—(No. 12.)
    • Bacon.—(No. 13.)
    • Ham,—(No. 14.)
    • Tongue.—(No. 15.)
    • Turkeys, Capons, Fowls, Chickens, &c.—(No. 16.)
    • Rabbits.—(No. 17.)
    • Tripe.—(No. 18.)
    • Cow-Heel,—(No. 18.*)
  • ROASTING.
    • Sirloin of Beef.—(No. 19.)
    • Ribs of Beef.—(No. 20).
    • Ribs of Beef boned and rolled.—(No. 21.)
    • MUTTON.124-*—(No. 23.)
    • A Leg,—(No. 24.)
    • A Chine or Saddle,—(No. 26.)
    • A Shoulder,—(No. 27.)
    • A Loin,125-*—(No. 28.)
    • A Neck,—(No. 29.)
    • A Breast,—(No. 30.)
    • A Haunch,—(No. 31.)
    • Mutton, venison fashion.—(No. 32.)
    • VEAL.—(No. 33.)
    • Fillet of Veal,—(No. 34.)
    • A Loin,—(No. 35.)
    • A Shoulder,—(No. 36.)
    • Neck, best end,—(No. 37.)
    • Breast,—(No. 38.)
    • Veal Sweetbread.—(No. 39.)
    • LAMB,—(No. 40.)
    • Hind-Quarter,—(No. 41).
    • Fore-Quarter,—(No. 42.)
    • Leg,—(No. 43.)
    • Shoulder,—(No. 44.)
    • Ribs,—(No. 45.)
    • Loin,—(No. 46.)
    • Neck,—(No. 47.)
    • Breast,—(No. 48.)
    • PORK.—(No. 49.)
    • A Leg,—(No. 50.)
    • Leg of Pork roasted without the Skin, commonly called Mock Goose.131-*—(No. 51.)
    • The Griskin,—(No. 52.)
    • A Bacon Spare-Rib,—(No. 53.)
    • Loin,—(No. 54.)
    • A Chine.—(No. 55.)
    • A Sucking-Pig,133-*—(No. 56.)
    • Turkey, Turkey Poults, and other Poultry.—(No. 57.)
    • Capons or Fowls,—(No. 58.)
    • Goose.—(No. 59.)
    • Green Goose.—(No. 60.)
    • Duck.—(No. 61.)
    • Haunch of Venison.—(No. 63.)
    • Neck and Shoulder of Venison,—(No. 64.)
    • A Fawn,—(No. 65.)
    • A Kid.—(No. 65*.)
    • Hare.—(No. 66.)
    • Mock Hare.—(No. 66.*)
    • Rabbit.—(No. 67.)
    • Pheasant.—(No. 68.)
    • Mock Pheasant.—(No. 69.)
    • Guinea and Pea Fowls,—(No. 69*.)
    • Partridges,—(No. 70.)
    • Black Cock (No. 71), Moor Game (No. 72), and Grouse, (No. 73.)
    • Wild Ducks.—(No. 74.)
    • Widgeons and Teal,—(No. 75.)
    • Woodcock.—(No. 76.)
    • Snipes,—(No. 77.)
    • Pigeons.—(No. 78.)
    • Larks and other small Birds.—(No. 80.)
    • Wheatears,—(No. 81.)
    • Lobster.—(No. 82.)
  • FRYING.
    • To clarify Drippings.—(No. 83.)
    • To clarify Suet to fry with.—(No. 84.)
    • Steaks.—(No. 85.)
    • Beef-steaks and Onions.—(No. 86. See also No. 501.)
    • Sausages,—(No. 87.)
    • Sweetbreads full-dressed.—(No. 88.)
    • Sweetbreads plain.—(No. 89.)
    • Veal Cutlets.—(No. 90 and No. 521.)
    • Lamb, or Mutton Chops,—(No. 92.)
    • Pork Chops.—(No. 93.)
  • BROILING.
    • Chops or Steaks.151-*—(No. 94.)
    • Kidneys.—(No. 95.)
    • A Fowl or Rabbit, &c.—(No. 97.)
    • Pigeons,—(No. 98.)
  • VEGETABLES.
    • Sixteen Ways of dressing Potatoes.155-*—(No. 102.)
    • Cold Potatoes fried.—(No. 102*.)
    • Potatoes boiled and broiled.—(No. 103.)
    • Potatoes fried in Slices or Shavings.—(No. 104.)
    • Potatoes fried whole.—(No. 105.)
    • Potatoes mashed.—(No. 106. See also No. 112.)
    • Potatoes mashed with Onions.—(No. 107.)
    • Potatoes escalloped.—(No. 108.)
    • Colcannon.—(No. 108*.)
    • Potatoes roasted.—(No. 109.)
    • Potatoes roasted under Meat.—(No. 110.)
    • Potato Balls.—(No. 111.)
    • Potato Balls Ragoût,—(No. 112.)
    • Potato Snow.—(No. 114.)
    • Potato Pie.—(No. 115.)
    • New Potatoes.—(No. 116.)
    • Jerusalem Artichokes,—(No. 117.)
    • Cabbage.—(No. 118.)
    • Boiled Cabbage fried.—(No. 119.)
    • Savoys,—(No. 120.)
    • Sprouts and young Greens.—(No. 121.)
    • Spinage.—(No. 122.)
    • Asparagus.—(No. 123.)
    • Sea Kale,—(No. 124.)
    • Cauliflower.—(No. 125.)
    • Broccoli.—(No. 126.)
    • Red Beet-roots,—(No. 127.)
    • Parsnips,—(No. 128.)
    • Carrots.—(No. 129.)
    • Turnips.—(No. 130.)
    • To mash Turnips.—(No. 131.)
    • Turnip-tops,—(No. 132.)
    • French Beans.—(No. 133.)
    • Green Pease.164-*—(No. 134.)
    • Cucumbers stewed.—(No. 135.)
    • Artichokes.—(No. 136.)
    • Stewed Onions.—(No. 137.)
    • Salads.—(No. 138*, also No. 372).
  • FISH.
    • Turbot to boil.—(No. 140).
    • A Brill,—(No. 143.)
    • Soles to boil.—(No. 144.)
    • Soles, or other Fish, to fry.—(No. 145.)
    • Soles to stew.—(No. 146.)
    • Fillets of Soles, brown or white.—(No. 147.)
    • Skate,172-*—(No. 148.)
    • Cod boiled.—(No. 149.)
    • Salt Fish boiled.—(No. 150.)
    • Slices of Cod boiled.—(No. 151.)
    • Fresh Sturgeon.—(No. 152.)
    • Whitings fried.—(No. 153.)
    • Skate fried.—(No. 154.)
    • Plaice or Flounders, fried or boiled.—(No. 155.)
    • To boil Flounders.
    • Water Souchy,175-*—(No. 156.)
    • Haddock boiled.—(No. 157.)
    • Findhorn Haddocks.—(No. 157*.)
    • To stew Cod’s Skull, Sole, Carp, Trout, Perch, Eel, or Flounder.—No. 158. (See also No. 164.)
    • To dress them maigre.
    • Maigre Fish Pies.
    • Perch, Roach, Dace, Gudgeons, &c. fried.—(No. 159.)
    • Perch boiled.179-*—(No. 160.)
    • Salmon, Herrings, Sprats, Mackerel, &c. pickled.—(No. 161.)
    • Salmon180-* boiled.—(No. 162.)
    • Fresh Salmon broiled.—(No. 163.)
    • Soles or Eels,181-* &c. &c. stewed Wiggy’s way.—(No. 164.)
    • To fry Eels.—(No. 165.)
    • Spitchocked Eels.—(No. 166.)
    • Mackerel boiled.183-*—(No. 167.)
    • Mackerel broiled.—(No. 169.)
    • Mackerel baked.184-*—(No. 170.)
    • Pickled Mackerel, Herrings, or Sprats.—(No. 171.)
    • Sprats broiled.—(No. 170*—Fried, see No. 173.)
    • Sprats stewed.—(No. 170**.)
    • Herrings broiled.—(No. 171*.)
    • Red Herrings, and other dried Fish,—(No. 172.)
    • Smelts, Gudgeons, Sprats, or other small Fish, fried.—(No. 173.)
    • Potted Prawns, Shrimps, or Cray-fish.—(No. 175.)
    • Lobster.187-*—(No. 176.)
    • Crab.—(No. 177.)
    • Potted Lobster or Crab.188-*—(No. 178).
    • OYSTERS.189-*—(No. 181.)
    • Scolloped Oysters.—(No. 182.) A good way to warm up any cold fish.
    • Stewed Oysters.—(No. 182*.)
    • Oysters fried.192-*—(No. 183.)
  • BROTHS, GRAVIES, AND SOUPS.
    • Beef Broth.193-*—(No. 185.)
    • Beef Gravy.194-*—(No. 186.)
    • Strong savoury Gravy (No. 188), alias “Brown Sauce,” alias “Grand Espagnol.”
    • Cullis, or thickened Gravy.—(No. 189.)
    • Veal Broth.—(No. 191.)
    • Veal Gravy.—(No. 192.)
    • Knuckle of Veal, or Shin or Leg of Beef, Soup.—(No. 193.)
    • Mutton Broth.—(No. 194.)
    • Mock Mutton Broth, without Meat, in five minutes.—(No. 195.)
    • The Queen’s Morning “Bouillon de Santé,”—(No. 196.)
    • Ox-heel Jelly.—(No. 198.)
    • Clear Gravy Soups.—(No. 200.)
    • Scotch Barley Broth;—a good and substantial dinner for fivepence per head.—(No. 204.)
    • Scotch Soups.—(No. 205.)
    • Winter Hotch-potch.
    • Cocky-leeky Soup.
    • Lamb Stove, or Lamb Stew.
    • Scotch Brose.—(No. 205*.)
    • Carrot Soup.—(No. 212.)
    • Turnip and Parsnip Soups,—(No. 213.)
    • Celery Soup.—(No. 214.)
    • Green Pease Soup.—(No. 216.)
    • Plain green Pease Soup without Meat.—(No. 217.)
    • Pease Soup.—(No. 218.)
    • Pease Soup and pickled Pork.—(No. 220.)
    • Plain Pease Soup.—(No. 221.)
    • Asparagus Soup.—(No. 222.)
    • Maigre, or Vegetable Gravy Soup.207-*—(No. 224.)
    • FISH SOUPS.—(No. 225.)
    • Eel Soup.
    • Cheap Soups.—(No. 229.)
    • Dr. Kitchiner’s Receipt to make a Gallon of Barley Broth for a Groat. See also No. 204.
    • Craw-fish Soup.—(No. 235.)
    • Lobster Soup.—(No. 237.)
    • Soup and Bouilli.—(No. 238. See also No. 5.)
    • Ox-head Soup,—(No. 239.)
    • Ox-tail Soup.—(No. 240.)
    • Ox-heel Soup,—(No. 240*.)
    • Hare, Rabbit, or Partridge Soup.—(No. 241.)
    • Game Soup.—(No. 242.)
    • Goose or Duck Giblet Soup.216-*—(No. 244.)
    • Mock Mock Turtle,—(No. 245.)
    • Mock Turtle,—(No. 247.)
    • English Turtle.—(No. 248.)
    • Curry, or Mullaga-tawny222-* Soup.—(No. 249.)
    • Turtle223-* Soup.—(No. 250.)
    • Portable223-† Soup, or Glaze.—(No. 252.)
    • To clarify Broth or Gravy.—(No. 252*.)
  • GRAVIES AND SAUCES.
    • Melted Butter,
    • Melted Butter.
    • Thickening.—(No. 257.)
    • Clarified Butter.—(No. 259.)
    • Burnt Butter.—(No. 260.)
    • Oiled Butter.—(No. 260*.)
    • Parsley and Butter.—(No. 261.)
    • Gooseberry Sauce.—(No. 263.)
    • Chervil, Basil, Tarragon, Burnet, Cress, and Butter.—(No. 264.)
    • Fennel and Butter for Mackerel, &c.—(No. 265.)
    • Mackerel-roe Sauce.—(No. 266.)
    • Egg Sauce.—(No. 267.)
    • Plum-pudding Sauce.—(No. 269.)
    • Anchovy Sauce.—(No. 270.)
    • Garlic Sauce.—(No. 272.)
    • Lemon Sauce.—(No. 273.)
    • Caper Sauce.—(No. 274. See also No. 295.)
    • Mock Caper Sauce.—(No. 275, or No. 295.)
    • Oyster Sauce.—(No. 278.)
    • Preserved Oysters.234-*—(No. 280.)
    • Shrimp Sauce.—(No. 283.)
    • Lobster Sauce.—(No. 284.)
    • Sauce for Lobster, &c.—(No. 285. See also No. 372.)
    • Liver and Parsley Sauce,—(No. 287.) or Liver and Lemon Sauce.
    • To make Lemon and Liver Sauce.
    • Liver Sauce for Fish.—(No. 288.)
    • Celery Sauce, white.—(No. 289.)
    • Celery Sauce Purée, for boiled Turkey, Veal, Fowls, &c. (No. 290.)
    • Green or Sorrel Sauce.—(No. 291.)
    • Tomata, or Love-apple Sauce.—(No. 292. See also No. 443.)
    • [Love-apple Sauce according to Ude.
    • Mock Tomata Sauce.—(No. 293.)
    • Eschalot Sauce.—(No. 294.)
    • Eschalot Sauce for boiled Mutton.—(No. 295.)
    • Young Onion Sauce.—(No. 296.)
    • Onion Sauce.—(No. 297.)
    • White Onion Sauce.—(No. 298.)
    • Brown Onion Sauces, or Onion Gravy.—(No. 299.)
    • Sage and Onion, or Goose-stuffing Sauce.—(No. 300.)
    • Green Mint Sauce.—(No. 303.)
    • Apple Sauce.—(No. 304.)
    • Mushroom Sauce.—(No. 305.)
    • Mushroom Sauce, brown.—(No. 306.)
    • Mushroom Sauce, extempore.—(No. 307.)
    • Poor Man’s Sauce.—(No. 310.)
    • The Spaniard’s Garlic Gravy.—(No. 311. See also No. 272.)
    • Mr. Michael Kelly’s244-* Sauce for boiled Tripe, Calf-head, or Cow-heel.—(No. 311*.)
    • Mr. Kelly’s Sauce piquante.
    • Fried Parsley.—(No. 317.)
    • Crisp Parsley.—(No. 318.)
    • Fried Bread Sippets.—(No. 319.)
    • Fried Bread-crumbs.—(No. 320.)
    • Bread Sauce.—(No. 321.)
    • Rice Sauce.—(No. 321*.)
    • Browning,—(No. 322.)
    • Gravy for roast Meat.—(No. 326.)
    • Gravy for boiled Meat,—(No. 327.)
    • Wow wow Sauce for stewed or bouilli Beef.—(No. 328.)
    • Beef-gravy Sauce—(No. 329), or Brown Sauce for Ragoût, Game, Poultry, Fish, &c.
    • Game Gravy.—(No. 337.)
    • Orange-gravy Sauce, for wild Ducks, Woodcocks, Snipes, Widgeon, and Teal, &c.—(No. 338.)
    • Bonne Bouche for Goose, Duck, or roast Pork.—(No. 341.)
    • Robert Sauce for roast Pork, or Geese, &c.—(No. 342.)
    • Turtle Sauce.—(No. 343.)
    • Essence of Turtle.—(No. 343*.)
    • Wine Sauce for Venison or Hare.—(No. 344.)
    • Sharp Sauce for Venison.—(No. 345.)
    • Sweet Sauce for Venison or Hare.—(No. 346.)
    • Mutton Gravy for Venison or Hare.—(No. 347.)
    • Curry Sauce,—(No. 348.)
    • Essence of Ham.—(No. 351.)
    • Grill Sauce.—(No. 355.)
    • Sauce à la Tartare.
    • Sauce for Steaks, or Chops, Cutlets, &c.—(No. 356. See also No. 331.)
    • Sauce Piquante for cold Meat, Game, Poultry, Fish, &c. or Salads.—(No. 359. See also No. 372, and Cucumber Vinegar, Nos. 399 and 453.)
    • Sauce for Hashes of Mutton or Beef.—(No. 360. See also Nos. 451, 485, and to make Plain Hash, No. 486.)
    • Sauce for hashed or minced Veal.—(No. 361. See No. 511.)
    • Bechamel, by English Cooks commonly called White Sauce. (No. 364.)
    • A more economical Method of making a Pint of White Sauce.—(No. 364—2.)
    • Poivrade Sauce.—(No. 365.)
    • Mustard in a minute.—(No. 369.)
    • Mustard.—(No. 370.)
    • Salt,—(No. 371.)
    • Salad mixture.—(No. 372. See also Nos. 138* and 453.)
    • Boiled Salad.
    • Forcemeat Stuffings.—(No. 373.)
    • Stuffing for Veal, roast Turkey, Fowl, &c.—(No. 374.)
    • Veal Forcemeat.—(No. 375.)
    • Stuffing for Turkeys or Fowls, &c.—(No. 377.)
    • Goose or Duck Stuffing.—(No. 378.)
    • Stuffing for Hare.—(No. 379.)
    • Forcemeat-Balls for Turtle, Mock Turtle, or Made Dishes. (No. 380. See also No. 375.)
    • Egg Balls.—(No. 381.)
    • Brain Balls.
    • Curry Balls for Mock Turtle, Veal, Poultry, Made Dishes, &c. (No. 382.)
    • Fish Forcemeat.—(No. 383.)
    • Zest Balls.—(No. 386. See No. 255.)
    • Orange or Lemon-peel, to mix with Stuffing.—(No. 387.)
    • Clouted or Clotted Cream.—(No. 388.)
    • Raspberry Vinegar.—(No. 390.)
    • Syrup of Lemons.—(No. 391.)
    • The Justice’s Orange Syrup for Punch or Puddings.—(No. 392.)
    • Syrup of Orange or Lemon-peel.—(No. 393.)
    • Vinegar for Salads.—(No. 395.)
    • Tarragon Vinegar.—(No. 396.)
    • Basil Vinegar or Wine.—(No. 397.)
    • Cress Vinegar.—(No. 397*.)
    • Green Mint Vinegar,—(No. 398.)
    • Burnet or Cucumber Vinegar.—(No. 399.)
    • Horseradish Vinegar.—(No. 399*.)
    • Garlic Vinegar.—(No. 400.)
    • Eschalot Vinegar,—(No. 401.)
    • Eschalot Wine.—(No. 402.)
    • Camp Vinegar.—(No. 403.)
    • Cayenne Pepper.—(No. 404.)
    • Essence of Cayenne.—(No. 405.)
    • Chili Vinegar.—(No. 405*.)
    • Chili, or Cayenne Wine.—(No. 406.)
    • Essence of Lemon-peel.—(No. 407.)
    • Artificial Lemon-juice.—(No. 407*.)
    • Quintessence of Lemon-peel.—(No. 408.)
    • Tincture of Lemon-peel.—(No. 408*.)
    • Essence of Celery.—(No. 409.)
    • Aromatic Essence of Ginger.—(No. 411.)
    • Essence of Allspice for mulling of Wine.—(No. 412.)
    • Tincture275-† of Allspice.—(No. 413.)
    • Tincture of Nutmeg.—(No. 413*.)
    • Essence of Clove and Mace.—(No. 414.)
    • Tincture of Clove.—(No. 415.)
    • Essence of Cinnamon.—(No. 416.)
    • Tincture of Cinnamon.—(No. 416*.)
    • Essence of Marjoram.—(No. 417.)
    • Vegetable Essences.—(No. 417*.)
    • Soup-herb277-* Spirit.—(No. 420.)
    • Spirit of Savoury Spice.—(No. 421.)
    • Soup-herb and Savoury Spice Spirit.—(No. 422.)
    • Relish for Chops, &c.—(No. 423.)
    • Fish Sauce.—(No. 425.)
    • Keeping Mustard.—(No. 427.)
    • Sauce Superlative.278-*—(No. 429.)
    • Quintessence of Anchovy.—(No. 433.)
    • Anchovy Paste, or le Beurre d’Anchois.—(No. 434.)
    • Anchovy Powder.—(No. 435.)
    • Walnut Catchup.—(No. 438.)
    • Mushroom Catchup.—(No. 439.)
    • Quintessence of Mushrooms.—(No. 440.)
    • Oyster Catchup.—(No. 441.)
    • Cockle and Muscle Catchup,—(No. 442.)
    • Pudding Catchup.—(No. 446.)
    • Potato286-* Starch.—(No. 448.)
    • Of the Flour of Potatoes.
    • Salad or piquante Sauce for cold Meat, Fish, &c.—(No. 453.) See also No. 372.
    • Curry Powder.—(No. 455.)
    • Savoury ragoût Powder.—(No. 457.)
    • Pease Powder.—(No. 458.)
    • Horseradish Powder.—(No. 458*.)
    • Soup-herb Powder, or Vegetable Relish.—(No. 459.)
    • Soup-herb and Savoury Powder, or Quintessence of Ragoût.—(No. 460.)
    • To Dry sweet and savoury Herbs.—(No. 461.)
    • THE MAGAZINE OF TASTE.—(No. 462.)
    • Toast and Water.—(No. 463.)
    • Cool Tankard, or Beer Cup.—(No. 464.)
    • Cider Cup,—(No. 465.)
    • Flip.—(No. 466.)
    • Tewahdiddle.—(No. 467.)
    • Sir Fleetwood Shepherd’s Sack Posset.—(No. 467*.)
    • To bottle Beer.—(No. 468.)
    • Rich Raspberry Wine or Brandy.—(No. 469.)
    • Liqueurs.—(No. 471.)
    • Curaçoa.—(No. 474.)
    • To make a Quart of Curaçoa.
    • Clarified Syrup.—(No. 475.)
    • Capillaire.—(No. 476.)
    • Lemonade in a Minute.—(No. 477.)
    • Punch directly.—(No. 478.)
    • Shrub, or Essence of Punch.—(No. 479.)
    • White, Red, or Black Currant, Grape, Raspberry, &c. Jelly.298-*—(No. 479*.)
    • Mock Arrack.—(No. 480.)
    • Calves’-Feet Jelly.—(No. 481.)
  • MADE DISHES, &C.
    • Receipts for economical Made Dishes, written for the Cook’s Oracle, by an accomplished English Lady.—(No. 483.)
    • To hash Mutton, &c.—(No. 484.)
    • To warm Hashes,304-* Made Dishes, Stews, Ragoûts, Soups, &c.—(No. 485.)
    • To hash Beef, &c.—(No. 486.)
    • Cold Meat broiled, with Poached Eggs.—(No. 487.)
    • Mrs. Phillips’s Irish Stew.—(No. 488.)
    • To make an Irish Stew, or Hunter’s Pie.
    • A good Scotch Haggis.—(No. 488*.)
    • Minced Collops.
    • Haricot306-* Mutton.—(No. 489.)
    • Mutton-Chops delicately stewed, and good Mutton Broth,—(No. 490.)
    • Shoulder of Lamb grilled.—(No. 491.)
    • Lamb’s Fry.—(No. 492.)
    • Shin of Beef308-* stewed.—(No. 493.)
    • Brisket of Beef stewed.—(No. 494.)
    • Haricot of Beef.—(No. 495.)
    • Savoury Salt Beef baked.—(No. 496.)
    • Curries.—(No. 497; see also No. 249.)
    • Stewed Rump-Steaks.—(No. 500.)
    • Broiled Rump-Steak with Onion Gravy.—(No. 501.) See also No. 299.
    • Alamode Beef, or Veal.—(No. 502.)
    • To pot Beef, Veal, Game, or Poultry, &c.—(No. 503.)
    • Sandwiches,—(No. 504.)
    • Meat Cakes.—(No. 504*.)
    • Bubble and Squeak, or fried Beef or Mutton and Cabbage.—(No. 505.)
    • Hashed Beef, and roast Beef bones boiled.—(No. 506.)
    • Ox-Cheek stewed.—(No. 507.)
    • Ox-Tails stewed.—(No. 508.)
    • Potted Ham, or Tongue.—(No. 509.)
    • Hashed Veal.—(No. 511.)
    • Hashed or minced Veal.—(No. 511*.)
    • To make an excellent Ragoût of Cold Veal.—(No. 512.)
    • Breast of Veal stewed.—(No. 515.)
    • Breast of Veal Ragoût.—(No. 517.)
    • Scotch Collops.—(No. 517*.)
    • Veal Olives.—(No. 518.)
    • Cold Calf’s Head hashed.—(No. 519.)
    • Calf’s Head hashed, or Ragoût.—(No. 520.) See No. 247.
    • Veal Cutlets broiled plain, or full-dressed.—(No. 521.)
    • Knuckle of Veal, to ragoût.—(No. 522.)
    • Knuckle of Veal stewed with Rice.—(No. 523.)
    • Mr. Gay’s Receipt to stew a Knuckle of Veal.—(No. 524.)
    • Slices of Ham or Bacon.—(No. 526.)
    • Relishing Rashers of Bacon.—(No. 527.)
    • Hashed Venison.—(No. 528.)
    • Hashed Hare.—(No. 529.)
    • Jugged Hare.—(No. 529*.)
    • Dressed Ducks, or Geese hashed.—(No. 530.)
    • Ragoûts of Poultry, Game, Pigeons, Rabbits, &c.—(No. 530*.)
    • Stewed Giblets.—(No. 531.)
    • Hashed Poultry, Game, or Rabbit.—(No. 533.)
    • Pulled Turkey, Fowl, or Chicken.—(No. 534.)
    • To dress Dressed Turkey, Goose, Fowl, Duck, Pigeon, or Rabbit.—(No. 535.)
    • Devil.—(No. 538.)
    • Crusts of Bread for Cheese, &c.—(No. 538.)
    • Toast and Cheese.—(No. 539.)
    • Toasted Cheese, No. 2.—(No. 540.)
    • Buttered Toast and Cheese.—(No. 541.)
    • Pounded Cheese.—(No. 542.)
    • Macaroni.—(No. 543.) See Macaroni Pudding for the Boiling of it.
    • English way of dressing Macaroni.
    • Macaroni Pudding.
    • Omelettes and various ways of dressing Eggs.—(No. 543*.)
    • Receipt for the common Omelette.
    • Marrow-Bones.—(No. 544.)
    • Eggs fried with Bacon.—(No. 545.)
    • Ragoût of Eggs and Bacon.—(No. 545*.)
    • To poach Eggs.—(No. 546.)
    • To boil Eggs to eat in the Shell, or for Salads.—(No. 547.)
    • Eggs poached with Sauce of minced Ham.—(No. 548.)
    • Fried Eggs and minced Ham or Bacon.—(No. 549.)
    • Tea.339-*—(No. 550.)
    • Coffee.340-*
    • Suet Pudding, Wiggy’s way.—(No. 551.)
    • Yorkshire Pudding under roast Meat, the Gipsies’ way.—(No. 552.)
    • Plum Pudding.—(No. 553.)
    • My Pudding.—(No. 554.)
    • Maigre Plum Pudding.
    • A Fat Pudding.
    • Pease Pudding.—(No. 555.)
    • Plain Bread Pudding.—(No. 556.)
    • Bread and butter Pudding.—(No. 557.)
    • Pancakes and Fritters.—(No. 558.)
    • Tansy Pancakes.
    • No. 560
    • Boston Apple Pudding.
    • Spring Fruit Pudding.
    • Nottingham Pudding.
    • Butter Pudding.
    • Newmarket Pudding.
    • Newcastle, or Cabinet Pudding.
    • Vermicelli Pudding.
    • Bread Pudding.
    • Custard Pudding.
    • Boiled Custards.
    • TO DRESS SPRING FRUIT.
    • Spring Fruit Soup.
    • Spring Fruit Pudding.
    • Spring Fruit—A Mock Gooseberry Sauce for Mackerel, &c.
    • Spring Fruit Tart.
    • Spring Cream, or mock Gooseberry Fool.
    • Spring Fruit Sherbet.
    • Gourds (now called vegetable Marrow) stewed.
    • Gourd Soup,
    • Fried Gourds.
    • Another Way.
    • To make Beef, Mutton, or Veal Tea.—(No. 563.)
    • Mutton Broth for the Sick.—(No. 564.)
    • Barley Water.350-*—(No. 565.)
    • Whey.—(No. 566.)
    • Toothache and anti-rheumatic Embrocation.—(No. 567.)
    • Stomachic Tincture—(No. 569.)—is
    • Paregoric Elixir.—(No. 570.)
    • Dr. Kitchiner’s Receipt to make Gruel.—(No. 572.)
    • Scotch Burgoo.—(No. 572*.)
    • Anchovy Toast.—(No. 573.)
    • Deviled Biscuit,—(No. 574.)
  • MARKETING TABLES,
    • MEAT.
    • POULTRY.
    • VEGETABLES.
  • APPENDIX; COMPRISING DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING PASTRY, PRESERVES, BREAD, PUDDINGS, PICKLES, &c. &c.
    • Puff Paste.—(No. 1.)
    • Paste for Meat or Savoury Pies.—(No. 2.)
    • Tart Paste for Family Pies.—(No. 3.)
    • Sweet, or short and crisped Tart Paste.—(No. 4.)
    • Raised Pies.—(No. 5.)
    • Paste for boiled Puddings.—(No. 6.)
    • Paste for stringing Tartlets, &c.—(No. 7.)
    • Paste for Croquants or Cut Pastry.—(No. 8.)
    • Venison Pasty.—(No. 9.)
    • Mutton or Veal Pie.—(No. 10.)
    • Hare Pie.—(No. 11.)
    • Savoury Pies, Pasties, and Patties.—(No. 12.)
    • Pigeon or Lark Pie.—(No. 13.)
    • Giblet Pie.—(No. 14.)
    • Rump-Steak Pie.—(No. 15.)
    • Chicken Pie.—(No. 16.)
    • Rabbit Pie.—(No. 17.)
    • Raised French Pie.—(No. 18.)
    • Raised Ham Pie.—(No. 19.)
    • Veal and Ham Pie.—(No. 20.)
    • Raised Pork Pie.—(No. 21.)
    • Eel Pie.—(No. 22.)
    • Raised Lamb Pies.—(No. 23.)
    • Beef-Steak Pudding.—(No. 24.)
    • Vol au Vent.—(No. 25.)
    • Oyster Patties.—(No. 26.)
    • Lobster Patties.—(No. 27.)
    • Veal and Ham Patties.—(No. 28.)
    • Chicken and Ham Patties.—(No. 29.)
    • Ripe Fruit Tarts.—(No. 30.)
    • Icing for Fruit Tarts, Puffs, or Pastry.—(No. 31.)
    • Apple Pie.—(No. 32.)
    • Apple Tart creamed.—(No. 33.)
    • Tartlets, such as are made at the Pastry Cooks.—(No. 34.)
    • French Tart of preserved Fruit.—(No. 35.)
    • Small Puffs of preserved Fruit.—(No. 36.)
    • Cranberry Tart.—(No. 37.)
    • Mince Pies.—(No. 38.)
    • Mince Meat.—(No. 39.)
    • Cheesecakes.—(No. 40.)
    • Lemon Cheesecakes.—(No. 41.)
    • Orange Cheesecakes.—(No. 42.)
    • Almond Cheesecakes.—(No. 43.)
    • Mille Feuilles, or a Pyramid of Paste.—(No. 44.)
    • Brunswick Tourte.—(No. 45.)
    • Blancmange.—(No. 46.)
    • Orange Jelly.—(No. 47.)
    • Italian Cream.—(No. 48.)
    • Trifle.—(No. 49.)
    • Whip Syllabub.—(No. 50.)
    • Chantilly Basket.—(No. 51.)
    • Baked Custard.—(No. 52.)
    • Boiled Custard.—(No. 53.)
    • Almond Custards.—(No. 54.)
    • Twelfth Cake.—(No. 55.)
    • Bride, or Wedding Cake.—(No. 56.)
    • Plain Pound Cake.—(No. 57.)
    • Plum Pound Cake.—(No. 58.)
    • Common Seed Cake.—(No. 59.)
    • Rich Yest Cake.—(No. 60.)
    • Queen, or Heart Cakes.—(No. 61.)
    • Queen’s Drops.—(No. 62.)
    • Shrewsbury Cakes.—(No. 63.)
    • Banbury Cakes.—(No. 64.)
    • Bath Buns.—(No. 65.)
    • Sponge Biscuits.—(No. 66.)
    • Savoy Cake, or Sponge Cake in a Mould.—(No. 67.)
    • Biscuit Drops.—(No. 68.)
    • Savoy Biscuits.—(No. 69.)
    • Italian Macaroons.—(No. 70.)
    • Ratafia Cakes.—(No. 71.)
    • Almond Sponge Cake.—(No. 72.)
    • Ratafia Cake.—(No. 73.)
    • Diet Bread Cake.—(No. 74.)
    • Orange Gingerbread.—(No. 75.)
    • Gingerbread Nuts.—(No. 76.)
    • Plain Buns.—(No. 77.)
    • Cross Buns.—(No. 78.)
    • Seed Buns.—(No. 79.)
    • Plum Buns.—(No. 80.)
    • Orgeat.—(No. 81.)
    • Baked Pears.—(No. 82.)
    • To dry Apples.—(No. 83.)
    • Icing, for Twelfth or Bride Cake.—(No. 84.)
    • To boil Sugar to Caramel.—(No. 85.)
    • A Croquante of Paste.—(No. 86.)
    • Derby or Short Cakes.—(No. 87.)
    • Egg and Ham Patties.—(No. 88.)
    • Damson, or other Plum Cheese.—(No. 89.)
    • Barley Sugar.—(No. 90.)
    • Barley Sugar Drops.—(No. 91.)
    • Raspberry Jam.—(No. 92.)
    • Apricot, or any Plum Jam.—(No. 93.)
    • Lemon Chips.—(No. 94.)
    • Dried Cherries.—(No. 95.)
    • Green Gages preserved in Syrup.—(No. 96.)
    • To preserve Ginger.—(No. 97.)
    • To preserve Cucumbers.—(No. 98.)
    • Preserved Fruit, without Sugar.—(No. 99.)
    • Bread.—(No. 100.)
    • French Bread and Rolls.—(No. 100*.)
    • Sally Lunn.—Tea Cakes.—(No. 101.)
    • Muffins.—(No. 102.)
    • Crumpets.—(No. 103.)
    • Yorkshire Cakes.—(No. 104.)
    • OBSERVATIONS ON PUDDINGS AND PIES.
    • College Puddings.—(No. 105.)
    • Rice Puddings baked, or boiled.—(No. 106.)
    • Ground Rice Pudding.—(No. 107.)
    • Rice Snow Balls.—(No. 108.)
    • Rice Blancmange.—(No. 109.)
    • Save-all Pudding.—(No. 110.)
    • Batter Pudding, baked or boiled.—(No. 111.)
    • Apple Pudding boiled.—(No. 112.)
    • Apple Dumplings.—(No. 113.)
    • Suet Pudding or Dumplings.—(No. 114.)
    • Cottage Potato Pudding or Cake.—(No. 115.)
    • OBSERVATIONS ON PICKLES.
    • Walnuts.—(No. 116.)
    • Gherkins.—(No. 117.)
    • French Beans—Nasturtiums, &c.—(No. 118.)
    • Beet Roots.—(No. 119.)
    • Red Cabbage.—(No. 120.)
    • Onions.—(No. 121.)
    • Cauliflowers or Broccoli.—(No. 122.)
    • Indian or mixed Pickles—Mango or Piccalilli.—(No. 123.)
  • HOUSEKEEPERS’ MANUAL.
    • VARIOUS USEFUL FAMILY RECEIPTS.
    • To prevent Beer becoming Flat after it is drawn.
    • To clean Plate.
    • The common Method of cleaning Plate.
    • Varnish for Oil Paintings.
    • Method of cleaning Paper-Hangings.
    • To make Wooden Stairs have the appearance of Stone.
    • French Polish.
    • Polish for Dining Tables,
    • To prevent disagreeable Smells from Sinks, &c.
    • To prevent Moths.
    • Paste.
  • OBSERVATIONS ON CARVING.
    • Buttock of Beef
  • INDEX.
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