How to Appreciate Music
Free

How to Appreciate Music

By Gustav Kobbé
Free
Book Description
Table of Contents
  • HOW TO APPRECIATE MUSIC
  • CONTENTS
  • TABLE OF CONTENTS
  • LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
  • INTRODUCTION
  • HOW TO APPRECIATE A PIANOFORTE RECITAL
  • I
    • THE PIANOFORTE
      • The King of Instruments.
      • Music Under One’s Fingers.
      • Melody and Accompaniment on One Instrument.
      • Music’s Debt to the Pianoforte.
      • Its Lowly Origin.
      • A Poet’s Advice to His Musical Daughter.
      • The Clavichord.
      • The Harpsichord.
      • Piano and Forte.
      • All Depends on the Player.
      • Decorations That Do Not Beautify.
    • The King of Instruments.
    • Music Under One’s Fingers.
    • Melody and Accompaniment on One Instrument.
    • Music’s Debt to the Pianoforte.
    • Its Lowly Origin.
    • A Poet’s Advice to His Musical Daughter.
    • The Clavichord.
    • The Harpsichord.
    • Piano and Forte.
    • All Depends on the Player.
    • Decorations That Do Not Beautify.
  • II
    • BACH’S SERVICE TO MUSIC
      • Bach in Modern Music.
      • Harmony and Counterpoint.
      • What a Fugue Is.
      • The Fugue and the Virtuoso.
      • What Counterpoint Lacks.
      • The Mission of the Player.
      • Music as a Science.
      • Science versus Feeling.
      • That “Ear for Music.”
      • Bach and the Weather Bureau.
      • The Bacon, Not the Shakespeare, of Music.
      • What Wagner Learned from Bach.
      • The Language of an Epoch.
      • Bach in the Recital Hall.
      • Rubinstein and the “Triple Concerto.”
      • “The Well-Tempered Clavichord.”
      • A King’s Tribute to Bach.
    • Bach in Modern Music.
    • Harmony and Counterpoint.
    • What a Fugue Is.
    • The Fugue and the Virtuoso.
    • What Counterpoint Lacks.
    • The Mission of the Player.
    • Music as a Science.
    • Science versus Feeling.
    • That “Ear for Music.”
    • Bach and the Weather Bureau.
    • The Bacon, Not the Shakespeare, of Music.
    • What Wagner Learned from Bach.
    • The Language of an Epoch.
    • Bach in the Recital Hall.
    • Rubinstein and the “Triple Concerto.”
    • “The Well-Tempered Clavichord.”
    • A King’s Tribute to Bach.
  • III
    • FROM FUGUE TO SONATA
      • Three Periods of Musical Development.
      • Rise of the Melodic School.
      • Scarlatti’s Importance as Composer and Virtuoso.
      • Rise of the Amateur.
      • Changes in Musical Taste.
      • Beethoven and the Epoch of the Sonata.
      • Beethoven’s Slow Development.
      • The Passing of the Sonata.
      • Orchestral Instead of Pianistic.
    • Three Periods of Musical Development.
    • Rise of the Melodic School.
    • Scarlatti’s Importance as Composer and Virtuoso.
    • Rise of the Amateur.
    • Changes in Musical Taste.
    • Beethoven and the Epoch of the Sonata.
    • Beethoven’s Slow Development.
    • The Passing of the Sonata.
    • Orchestral Instead of Pianistic.
  • IV
    • DAWN OF THE ROMANTIC PERIOD
      • What a Sonata Is.
      • How Beethoven Enlarged the Form.
      • His “Moonlight Sonata.”
      • Striving for Freedom.
      • The Beethoven Periods.
      • Sonatas Now Old-fashioned.
      • The First Romantic Composers.
      • Schubert’s Pianoforte Music.
      • Mendelssohn’s “Songs Without Words.”
    • What a Sonata Is.
    • How Beethoven Enlarged the Form.
    • His “Moonlight Sonata.”
    • Striving for Freedom.
    • The Beethoven Periods.
    • Sonatas Now Old-fashioned.
    • The First Romantic Composers.
    • Schubert’s Pianoforte Music.
    • Mendelssohn’s “Songs Without Words.”
  • V
    • CHOPIN, THE POET OF THE PIANOFORTE
      • Tempo Rubato.
      • The Soul of the Pianoforte.
      • A Clear Melodic Line.
      • The Études.
      • Vigor, Passion, and Impetus.
      • The Préludes.
      • Nocturnes.
      • Chopin and Poe.
      • Waltzes and Mazurkas.
      • Liszt on the Mazurkas.
      • Other Works.
      • A Noble from Head to Foot.
    • Tempo Rubato.
    • The Soul of the Pianoforte.
    • A Clear Melodic Line.
    • The Études.
    • Vigor, Passion, and Impetus.
    • The Préludes.
    • Nocturnes.
    • Chopin and Poe.
    • Waltzes and Mazurkas.
    • Liszt on the Mazurkas.
    • Other Works.
    • A Noble from Head to Foot.
  • VI
    • SCHUMANN, THE “INTIMATE”
      • Poet, Bourgeois, and Philosopher.
      • “Carnaval” and “Kreisleriana.”
      • Thoughts of His Clara.
    • Poet, Bourgeois, and Philosopher.
    • “Carnaval” and “Kreisleriana.”
    • Thoughts of His Clara.
  • VII
    • LISZT, THE GIANT AMONG VIRTUOSOS
      • Kissed by Beethoven.
      • Episode with Countess D’Agoult.
      • The Don Juan Fantasie.
      • Giant Strides in Virtuosity.
      • Sonata, Concertos and Rhapsodies.
      • How Liszt Played.
    • Kissed by Beethoven.
    • Episode with Countess D’Agoult.
    • The Don Juan Fantasie.
    • Giant Strides in Virtuosity.
    • Sonata, Concertos and Rhapsodies.
    • How Liszt Played.
  • VIII
    • WITH PADEREWSKI—A MODERN PIANIST ON TOUR
      • The “Piano Doctor.”
      • Pianofortes on Their Travels.
      • “Thawing Out” a Pianoforte.
    • The “Piano Doctor.”
    • Pianofortes on Their Travels.
    • “Thawing Out” a Pianoforte.
  • HOW TO APPRECIATE AN ORCHESTRAL CONCERT
  • IX
    • DEVELOPMENT OF THE ORCHESTRA
      • Primitive Orchestral Efforts.
      • Beethoven and the Modern Orchestra.
      • How He Developed Orchestral Resources.
      • Beethoven and Wagner.
      • Berlioz, an Orchestral Juggler.
      • Wagner, Greatest of Orchestral Composers.
      • How Wagner Produces His Effects.
    • Primitive Orchestral Efforts.
    • Beethoven and the Modern Orchestra.
    • How He Developed Orchestral Resources.
    • Beethoven and Wagner.
    • Berlioz, an Orchestral Juggler.
    • Wagner, Greatest of Orchestral Composers.
    • How Wagner Produces His Effects.
  • X
    • INSTRUMENTS OF THE ORCHESTRA
      • The Prima Donna of the Orchestra.
      • Viola, Violoncello and Double Bass.
      • Dividing the String Band.
      • A Passage in “Die Walküre.”
      • The Woodwind.
      • The English Horn in “Tristan.”
      • Brass Instruments.
      • Richard Strauss’s Tribute to the Horn.
    • The Prima Donna of the Orchestra.
    • Viola, Violoncello and Double Bass.
    • Dividing the String Band.
    • A Passage in “Die Walküre.”
    • The Woodwind.
    • The English Horn in “Tristan.”
    • Brass Instruments.
    • Richard Strauss’s Tribute to the Horn.
  • XI
    • CONCERNING SYMPHONIES
      • Esthetic Purpose of the Symphony.
      • Seems to Hamper Modern Composers.
      • The Naive Symphonists.
      • Beethoven to the Fore.
      • Schubert’s Genius.
    • Esthetic Purpose of the Symphony.
    • Seems to Hamper Modern Composers.
    • The Naive Symphonists.
    • Beethoven to the Fore.
    • Schubert’s Genius.
  • XII
    • RICHARD STRAUSS AND HIS MUSIC
      • Originator of the Tone Poem.
      • Not a Juggler with the Orchestra.
      • Not Mere Bulk and Noise.
      • Life and Truth.
      • Literally Tone Dramas.
      • An Intellectual Force in Music.
      • Tribute to Wagner.
      • Richard Straussiana.
    • Originator of the Tone Poem.
    • Not a Juggler with the Orchestra.
    • Not Mere Bulk and Noise.
    • Life and Truth.
    • Literally Tone Dramas.
    • An Intellectual Force in Music.
    • Tribute to Wagner.
    • Richard Straussiana.
  • XIII
    • A NOTE ON CHAMBER MUSIC
  • HOW TO APPRECIATE VOCAL MUSIC
  • XIV
    • SONGS AND SONG COMPOSERS
      • Too Poor to Buy Music Paper.
      • How the “Erlking” was Composed.
      • Finck on Schubert.
      • Schumann’s Individuality.
      • Phases of Franz’s Genius.
      • Self-Critical.
      • Brahms a Thinker in Music.
      • Grieg’s Originality.
      • Liszt’s Genius for Song.
    • Too Poor to Buy Music Paper.
    • How the “Erlking” was Composed.
    • Finck on Schubert.
    • Schumann’s Individuality.
    • Phases of Franz’s Genius.
    • Self-Critical.
    • Brahms a Thinker in Music.
    • Grieg’s Originality.
    • Liszt’s Genius for Song.
  • XV
    • ORATORIO
      • An Incongruous Art-Form.
      • Primitive Efforts.
      • Bach’s “Passion Music.”
      • Rockstro on Händel.
      • Mendelssohn’s Oratorios.
    • An Incongruous Art-Form.
    • Primitive Efforts.
    • Bach’s “Passion Music.”
    • Rockstro on Händel.
    • Mendelssohn’s Oratorios.
  • XVI
    • OPERA AND MUSIC-DRAMA
      • Reforms by Gluck.
      • Comparative Popularity of Certain Operas.
      • Wagner’s Music-Dramas.
      • Wagner a Melodist.
      • Leading Motives not Mere Labels.
    • Reforms by Gluck.
    • Comparative Popularity of Certain Operas.
    • Wagner’s Music-Dramas.
    • Wagner a Melodist.
    • Leading Motives not Mere Labels.
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