Physics in Context for Cambridge International AS & A Level
$54.99

Physics in Context for Cambridge International AS & A Level

By Jim Breithaupt
US$ 54.99
Book Description

Mapped to the latest Cambridge A Level Physics syllabus (9702), this comprehensive resource supports students with its stretching, problem solving approach. It helps foster long-term performance in science, as well as building their confidence for the Cambridge examinations. The practical approach helps to make science meaningful, so it is ideal for students planning to study science at university. Includes support for the new Key Concepts -developing Cambridge
students' subject knowledge and encouraging them to make links between topics.

Table of Contents
  • Front Cover
  • Title Page
  • Contents
  • Introduction
  • Part 1: Skills forstarting physics
  • Part 2:Practical skills
  • Making careful measurements
  • Everyday physics instruments
  • More about measurements
  • Analysis and evaluation
  • 1 Kinematics
    • 1.1 Vectors and scalars
    • 1.2 Speed and velocity
    • 1.3 Acceleration
    • 1.4 Motion along a straight line at aconstant acceleration
    • 1.5 Free fall
    • 1.6 Motion graphs
    • 1.7 More calculations on motion along astraight line
    • 1.8 Projectile motion 1
    • 1.9 Projectile motion 2
    • 1 End of chapter questions
  • 2 Forces in action
    • 2.1 Force and acceleration
    • 2.2 Using F = ma
    • 2.3 Terminal speed
    • 2.4 Work and energy
    • 2.5 Kinetic energy and potential energy
    • 2.6 Power
    • 2.7 Efficiency
    • 2.8 Renewable energy
    • 2 End of chapter questions
  • 3 Forces in equilibrium
    • 3.1 Balanced forces
    • 3.2 The Principle of Moments
    • 3.3 More on moments
    • 3.4 Stability
    • 3.5 Equilibrium rules
    • 3.6 Statics calculations
    • 3 End of chapter questions
  • 4 Force and momentum
    • 4.1 Momentum
    • 4.2 Impact force
    • 4.3 Conservation of momentum
    • 4.4 Elastic and inelastic collisions
    • 4.5 Explosions
    • 4 End of chapter questions
  • 5 Forces and materials
    • 5.1 Density
    • 5.2 Pressure
    • 5.3 Springs
    • 5.4 Deformation of solids
    • 5.5 More about stress and strain
    • 5 End of chapter questions
    • Key concepts: Forces
  • 6 Electric current
    • 6.1 Electric charge
    • 6.2 Current and charge
    • 6.3 Potential difference and power
    • 6.4 Resistance
    • 6.5 Components and their characteristics
    • 6.6 Electric field strength
    • 6 End of chapter questions
  • 7 D.C. circuits
    • 7.1 Circuit rules
    • 7.2 More about resistance
    • 7.3 E.m.f. and internal resistance
    • 7.4 More circuit calculations
    • 7.5 The potential divider
    • 7 End of chapter questions
  • 8 Waves
    • 8.1 Waves and vibrations
    • 8.2 Measuring waves
    • 8.3 Wave properties 1
    • 8.4 Wave properties 2
    • 8.5 Stationary and progressive waves
    • 8.6 More about stationary waves on strings
    • 8.7 Stationary waves in pipes
    • 8.8 The Doppler effect
    • 8 End of chapter questions
  • 9 Optics
    • 9.1 Interference of light
    • 9.2 More about interference
    • 9.3 The diffraction grating
    • 9.4 Reflection and refraction of light
    • 9.5 Total internal reflection
    • 9 End of chapter questions
  • 10 Radioactivity
    • 10.1 The discovery of the nucleus
    • 10.2 Inside the atom
    • 10.3 The properties of α, β and γ radiation
    • 10.4 More about α, β and γ radiation
    • 10.5 The dangers of radioactivity
    • 10.6 Fundamental particles
    • 10 End of chapter questions
  • 11 Motion in a circle
    • 11.1 Uniform circular motion
    • 11.2 Centripetal acceleration
    • 11.3 On the road
    • 11.4 At the fairground
    • 11 End of chapter questions
  • 12 Oscillations
    • 12.1 Measuring oscillations
    • 12.2 The principles of simple harmonic motion
    • 12.3 More about sine waves
    • 12.4 Applications of simple harmonic motion
    • 12.5 Energy and simple harmonic motion
    • 12.6 Forced oscillations and resonance
    • 12 End of chapter questions
  • 13 Gravitational fields
    • 13.1 Gravitational field strength
    • 13.2 Gravitational potential
    • 13.3 Newton’s law of gravitation
    • 13.4 Planetary fields
    • 13.5 Satellite motion
    • 13 End of chapter questions
  • 14 Electric fields
    • 14.1 Coulomb’s law
    • 14.2 Electric potential
    • 14.3 Electric field strength of point charges
    • 14.4 Comparison between electric and gravitational fields
    • 14 End of chapter questions
  • 15 Capacitors
    • 15.1 Capacitance
    • 15.2 Capacitors in series and parallel
    • 15.3 Energy stored in a charged capacitor
    • 15.4 Capacitor discharge
    • 15 End of chapter questions
  • 16 Electronics
    • 16.1 Electronic sensors
    • 16.2 Operational amplifiers
    • 16.3 Output devices
    • 16.4 Semiconductor devices
    • 16 End of chapter questions
  • 17 Communications
    • 17.1 Communication systems
    • 17.2 Digital transmission
    • 17.3 Communication links
    • 17 End of chapter questions
  • 18 Magnetic fields
    • 18.1 Magnetic field patterns
    • 18.2 The motor effect
    • 18.3 Magnetic flux density
    • 18.4 Moving charges in a magnetic field
    • 18.5 Charged particles in circular orbits
    • 18 End of chapter questions
  • 19 Electromagnetic induction
    • 19.1 Generating electricity
    • 19.2 The laws of electromagnetic induction
    • 19.3 Alternating current
    • 19.4 The transformer
    • 19 End of chapter questions
  • 20 Thermal physics
    • 20.1 Internal energy and temperature
    • 20.2 Temperature scales
    • 20.3 Specific heat capacity
    • 20.4 Change of state
    • 20.5 Heat transfer
    • 20 End of chapter questions
  • 21 Gases
    • 21.1 Experiments on gases
    • 21.2 The ideal gas law
    • 21.3 The kinetic theory of gases
    • 21.4 Thermodynamics of ideal gases
    • 21 End of chapter questions
  • 22 Electrons
    • 22.1 The discovery of the electron
    • 22.2 The measurement of the specific charge ofthe electron, e/m
    • 22.3 The determination of the charge of theelectron, e, by Millikan’s method
    • 22.4 Electromagnetic waves
    • 22.5 Photoelectricity
    • 22.6 More about photoelectricity
    • 22.7 Energy levels and spectra
    • 22.8 Energy bands
    • 22.9 Wave–particle duality
    • 22 End of chapter questions
  • 23 Nuclear physics
    • 23.1 Radioactive decay
    • 23.2 The theory of radioactive decay
    • 23.3 Radioactive isotopes in use
    • 23.4 Energy from the nucleus
    • 23.5 Binding energy
    • 23.6 Fission and fusion
    • 23 End of chapter questions
  • 24 Medical imaging
    • 24.1 Ultrasonic imaging
    • 24.2 X-rays
    • 24.3 Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)
    • 24 End of chapter questions
    • Key concepts: Thermal and nuclear physics
  • 25 Physics of the eye and the ear
    • 25.1 The eye as an optical refracting system
    • 25.2 Lenses
    • 25.3 Defects of vision
    • 25.4 The structure of the ear
    • 25.5 Sound measurements
    • 25.6 Frequency response
  • Glossary
  • Answers toin-topic questions
  • Answers to key concept questions
  • Index
  • Back Cover
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