The New Education A Review of Progressive Educational Movements of the Day (1915)
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The New Education A Review of Progressive Educational Movements of the Day (1915)

By Scott Nearing
Free
Book Description
Table of Contents
  • The New Education
  • A REVIEW OF PROGRESSIVE EDUCATIONAL MOVEMENTS OF THE DAY
    • BY
  • SCOTT NEARING, Ph.D.
    • AUTHOR OF “SOCIAL ADJUSTMENT,” “THE SUPER RACE,” “WAGES IN THE UNITED STATES,” “SOCIAL SANITY,” “REDUCING THE COST OF LIVING,” etc.
  • PREFACE
  • CONTENTS
  • THE NEW EDUCATION
    • INTRODUCTION
  • THE OLD EDUCATION
    • I The Critical Spirit and the Schools
      • II Some Harsh Words from the Inside
      • III A Word from Huxley and Spencer
      • IV Some Honest Facts
      • V Have We Fulfilled the Object of Education?
    • II Some Harsh Words from the Inside
    • III A Word from Huxley and Spencer
    • IV Some Honest Facts
    • V Have We Fulfilled the Object of Education?
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • CHAPTER I
  • THE NEW BASIS FOR EDUCATION[16]
    • I Can There Be a New Basis?
      • II Social Change
      • III Keeping Up with the Times
      • IV Education in the Early Home
      • V City Life and the New Basis for Education
    • II Social Change
    • III Keeping Up with the Times
    • IV Education in the Early Home
    • V City Life and the New Basis for Education
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • CHAPTER II
  • TEACHING BOYS AND GIRLS
    • I The New School Machinery
      • II Rousseau Versus a Class of Forty
      • III The Fallacious “Average”
      • IV The Five Ages of Childhood
      • V Age Distribution in One Grade
      • VI Shall Child or Subject Matter Come First?
      • VII The Vicious Practices of One “Good” School
      • VIII Boys and Girls—The One Object of Educational Activity
    • II Rousseau Versus a Class of Forty
    • III The Fallacious “Average”
    • IV The Five Ages of Childhood
    • V Age Distribution in One Grade
    • VI Shall Child or Subject Matter Come First?
    • VII The Vicious Practices of One “Good” School
    • VIII Boys and Girls—The One Object of Educational Activity
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • CHAPTER III
  • FITTING SCHOOLS TO CHILDREN
    • I Child Growth—A Primary Factor in Child Life
      • II Children Need Health First
      • III Play as a Means to Growth
      • IV Some Things Which a Child Must Learn
      • V What Schools Must Provide to Meet Child Needs
      • VI The Educational Work of the Small Town
      • VII The Educational Problems of an Industrial Community
      • VIII Beginning with Child Needs
    • II Children Need Health First
    • III Play as a Means to Growth
    • IV Some Things Which a Child Must Learn
    • V What Schools Must Provide to Meet Child Needs
    • VI The Educational Work of the Small Town
    • VII The Educational Problems of an Industrial Community
    • VIII Beginning with Child Needs
    • CHAPTER IV
  • PROGRESSIVE NOTES IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION
    • I The Kindergarten
      • II Translating the Three R’s
      • III Playing at Mathematics
      • IV A Model English Lesson
      • V An Original Fairy Story
      • VI The Crow and the Scarecrow
      • VII School and Home
      • VIII Breaking New Ground
      • IX The School and the Community
      • X New Keys for Old Locks
      • XI School and Shop
      • XII Half a Chance to Study
      • XIII Thwarting Satan in the Summer Time
      • XIV Sending the Whole Child to School
      • XV Smashing the School Machine
      • XVI All Hands Around for An Elementary School
      • XVII From a Blazed Trail to a Paved Highway
    • II Translating the Three R’s
    • III Playing at Mathematics
    • IV A Model English Lesson
    • V An Original Fairy Story
    • VI The Crow and the Scarecrow
    • VII School and Home
    • VIII Breaking New Ground
    • IX The School and the Community
    • X New Keys for Old Locks
    • XI School and Shop
    • XII Half a Chance to Study
    • XIII Thwarting Satan in the Summer Time
    • XIV Sending the Whole Child to School
    • XV Smashing the School Machine
    • XVI All Hands Around for An Elementary School
    • XVII From a Blazed Trail to a Paved Highway
    • CHAPTER V
  • KEEPING THE HIGH SCHOOL IN STEP WITH LIFE
    • I The Responsibility of the High School
      • II An Experiment in Futures
      • III The Success Habit
      • IV The Help-Out Spirit
      • V Joining Hands with the Elementary Schools
      • VI The Abolition of “Mass Play”
      • VII Experimental Democracy
      • VIII Breaching the Chinese Wall of High School Classicism
      • IX An Up-to-Date High School
      • X From School to Shop and Back Again
      • XI Fitting the High School Graduate Into Life
      • XII The High School as a Public Servant
    • II An Experiment in Futures
    • III The Success Habit
    • IV The Help-Out Spirit
    • V Joining Hands with the Elementary Schools
    • VI The Abolition of “Mass Play”
    • VII Experimental Democracy
    • VIII Breaching the Chinese Wall of High School Classicism
    • IX An Up-to-Date High School
    • X From School to Shop and Back Again
    • XI Fitting the High School Graduate Into Life
    • XII The High School as a Public Servant
    • CHAPTER VI
  • HIGHER EDUCATION AT LOWVILLE[20]
    • I Lowville and the Neighborhood
      • II Lowville Academy
      • III The School’s Opportunity
      • IV Field Work as Education
      • V Real Domestic Science
      • VI One Instance of Success
    • II Lowville Academy
    • III The School’s Opportunity
    • IV Field Work as Education
    • V Real Domestic Science
    • VI One Instance of Success
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • CHAPTER VII
  • A GREAT CITY SCHOOL SYSTEM[21]
    • I “Co-operation” and “Progressivism"
      • II An Educational Creed
      • III Vitalizing the Kindergarten
      • IV Regenerating the Grades
      • V Popularizing High School Education
      • VI A City University
      • VII Special Schools for Special Classes
      • VIII Special Schools for Special Children
      • IX Playground and Summer Schools
      • X Mr. Dyer and the Men Who Stood With Him
    • II An Educational Creed
    • III Vitalizing the Kindergarten
    • IV Regenerating the Grades
    • V Popularizing High School Education
    • VI A City University
    • VII Special Schools for Special Classes
    • VIII Special Schools for Special Children
    • IX Playground and Summer Schools
    • X Mr. Dyer and the Men Who Stood With Him
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • CHAPTER VIII
  • THE OYLER SCHOOL OF CINCINNATI
    • I An Experiment in Social Education
      • II An Appeal for Applied Education
      • III Solving a Local Problem
      • IV Domestic Science Which Domesticates
      • V Making Commercial Products in the Grades
      • VI A Real Interest in School
      • VII The Mothers’ Club
      • VIII The Disappearance of “Discipline"
      • IX The Spirit of Oyler
    • II An Appeal for Applied Education
    • III Solving a Local Problem
    • IV Domestic Science Which Domesticates
    • V Making Commercial Products in the Grades
    • VI A Real Interest in School
    • VII The Mothers’ Club
    • VIII The Disappearance of “Discipline"
    • IX The Spirit of Oyler
    • CHAPTER IX
  • VITALIZING RURAL EDUCATION
    • I The Call of the Country
      • II Making Bricks with Straw
      • III Making the One-Room Country School Worth While
      • IV Repainting the Little Red Schoolhouse
      • V A Fairyland of Rural Education
      • VI The Task of the Country School
    • II Making Bricks with Straw
    • III Making the One-Room Country School Worth While
    • IV Repainting the Little Red Schoolhouse
    • V A Fairyland of Rural Education
    • VI The Task of the Country School
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • CHAPTER X
  • OUT OF THE MOUTHS OF BABES AND SUCKLINGS
    • I Miss Belle
      • II Going to Work Through the Children
      • III Beginning on Muffins
      • IV Taking the Boys in Hand
      • V “Busy Work” as an Asset
      • VI Marguerite
      • VII Winning Over the Families
    • II Going to Work Through the Children
    • III Beginning on Muffins
    • IV Taking the Boys in Hand
    • V “Busy Work” as an Asset
    • VI Marguerite
    • VII Winning Over the Families
    • CHAPTER XI
  • WIDE-AWAKE SLEEPY EYE
    • I Fitting Schools to Needs
      • II Getting the Janitor in Line
      • III The Department of Agriculture
      • IV A Short Course for Busy People
      • V Letting the Boys Do It
      • VI A Look at the Domestic Science
      • VII How It Works Out
      • VIII Theoretical and Practical
    • II Getting the Janitor in Line
    • III The Department of Agriculture
    • IV A Short Course for Busy People
    • V Letting the Boys Do It
    • VI A Look at the Domestic Science
    • VII How It Works Out
    • VIII Theoretical and Practical
    • CHAPTER XII
  • THE SOUTH FOR THE NEW EDUCATION
    • I A Dream of Empire
      • II Finding the Way
      • III Jem’s Father
      • IV Club Life Militant
      • V Canning Clubs
      • VI Recognition Day for Boys and Girls
      • VII Teaching Grown-Ups to Read
      • VIII George Washington, Junior
      • IX A Step Toward Good Health
      • X Theory and Practice[28]
      • XI A People Coming to Its Own
    • II Finding the Way
    • III Jem’s Father
    • IV Club Life Militant
    • V Canning Clubs
    • VI Recognition Day for Boys and Girls
    • VII Teaching Grown-Ups to Read
    • VIII George Washington, Junior
    • IX A Step Toward Good Health
    • X Theory and Practice[28]
    • XI A People Coming to Its Own
    • FOOTNOTES:
    • CHAPTER XIII
    • THE SPIRIT OF THE NEW EDUCATION
      • I The Standard of Education
      • II Standardization Was a Failure
      • III Education as Growth
      • IV Child Needs and Community Needs
      • V The Final Test of Education
    • I The Standard of Education
    • II Standardization Was a Failure
    • III Education as Growth
    • IV Child Needs and Community Needs
    • V The Final Test of Education
  • INDEX
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