The Works of Aphra Behn Volume IV
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The Works of Aphra Behn Volume IV

By Aphra Behn
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Book Description
Table of Contents
  • THE WORKS
    • APHRA BEHN
      • CONTENTS.
        • Arrangement of Editor’s Notes
      • Arrangement of Editor’s Notes
    • CONTENTS.
      • Arrangement of Editor’s Notes
    • Arrangement of Editor’s Notes
  • SIR PATIENT FANCY.
    • ARGUMENT.
      • SOURCE.
        • THEATRICAL HISTORY.
        • TO THE READER.
      • THEATRICAL HISTORY.
      • TO THE READER.
      • SIR PATIENT FANCY.
        • PROLOGUE,
        • DRAMATIS PERSONÆ.
      • PROLOGUE,
      • DRAMATIS PERSONÆ.
      • ACT I.
        • Scene I. A Room in Lady Knowell’s House.
        • A Chair and a Table. Enter Sir Credulous in a riding habit. Curry his Groom carrying a Portmantle.
      • Scene I. A Room in Lady Knowell’s House.
      • A Chair and a Table. Enter Sir Credulous in a riding habit. Curry his Groom carrying a Portmantle.
      • ACT II.
        • Scene I. A Garden to Sir Patient Fancy’s House.
        • Scene II. Changes to a Chamber.
      • Scene I. A Garden to Sir Patient Fancy’s House.
      • Scene II. Changes to a Chamber.
      • ACT III.
        • Scene I.
        • Scene II. Lady Knowell’s Chamber.
        • Scene III. A Garden.
        • Scene IV. Draws off, and discovers L. Fancy in her Night-gown, in a Chamber as by the dark.
        • Scene V. Changes again to a Garden.
        • A confused Noise of the Serenade, the Scene VI draws off to Lady Fancy’s Anti-chamber.
        • Scene VII. Changes to Lady Fancy’s Bed-chamber, discovers her as before; Lodwick as just risen in Disorder from the Bed, buttoning himself, and setting himself in order; and Noise at the Door of unlatching it.
        • The Scene draws over Sir Patient and Lady: draws again and discovers Scene VIII. The Garden, Wittmore, Fanny, and Isabella.
        • Scene IX. Changes to the long Street, a Pageant of an Elephant coming from the farther end with Sir Credulous on it, and several others playing on strange confused Instruments.
      • Scene I.
      • Scene II. Lady Knowell’s Chamber.
      • Scene III. A Garden.
      • Scene IV. Draws off, and discovers L. Fancy in her Night-gown, in a Chamber as by the dark.
      • Scene V. Changes again to a Garden.
      • A confused Noise of the Serenade, the Scene VI draws off to Lady Fancy’s Anti-chamber.
      • Scene VII. Changes to Lady Fancy’s Bed-chamber, discovers her as before; Lodwick as just risen in Disorder from the Bed, buttoning himself, and setting himself in order; and Noise at the Door of unlatching it.
      • The Scene draws over Sir Patient and Lady: draws again and discovers Scene VIII. The Garden, Wittmore, Fanny, and Isabella.
      • Scene IX. Changes to the long Street, a Pageant of an Elephant coming from the farther end with Sir Credulous on it, and several others playing on strange confused Instruments.
      • ACT IV.
        • Scene I. Lady Knowell’s House.
        • Scene II. A Chamber in Sir Patient Fancy’s House. A Table and Chairs.
        • Scene III. A Hall.
        • Scene IV. The Lady Fancy’s Bed-Chamber; she’s discover’d with Wittmore in disorder. A Table, Sword, and Hat.
      • Scene I. Lady Knowell’s House.
      • Scene II. A Chamber in Sir Patient Fancy’s House. A Table and Chairs.
      • Scene III. A Hall.
      • Scene IV. The Lady Fancy’s Bed-Chamber; she’s discover’d with Wittmore in disorder. A Table, Sword, and Hat.
      • ACT V.
        • Scene I. A Room in Sir Patient Fancy’s House. A Table, and six Chairs.
        • EPILOGUE,
        • Notes on the Text.
        • Notes: Critical And Explanatory.
        • Cross-References
        • Transcriber’s Footnote
      • Scene I. A Room in Sir Patient Fancy’s House. A Table, and six Chairs.
      • EPILOGUE,
      • Notes on the Text.
      • Notes: Critical And Explanatory.
      • Cross-References
      • Transcriber’s Footnote
      • THE AMOROUS PRINCE.
        • ARGUMENT.
        • SOURCE.
        • THEATRICAL HISTORY.
      • ARGUMENT.
      • SOURCE.
      • THEATRICAL HISTORY.
      • THE AMOROUS PRINCE.
        • PROLOGUE.
        • DRAMATIS PERSONÆ.
        • SCENE, The Court of Florence.
      • PROLOGUE.
      • DRAMATIS PERSONÆ.
      • SCENE, The Court of Florence.
      • ACT I.
        • Scene I. The Chamber of Cloris.
        • Scene II. A Grove.
        • Scene III. The Apartment of Antonio.
        • Scene IV. The Same.
      • Scene I. The Chamber of Cloris.
      • Scene II. A Grove.
      • Scene III. The Apartment of Antonio.
      • Scene IV. The Same.
      • ACT II.
        • Scene I. The Apartment of Frederick.
        • Scene II. Antonio’s House.
        • Scene III. The Street.
        • Scene IV. Antonio’s House.
        • Scene V. A Chamber in Alberto’s House.
      • Scene I. The Apartment of Frederick.
      • Scene II. Antonio’s House.
      • Scene III. The Street.
      • Scene IV. Antonio’s House.
      • Scene V. A Chamber in Alberto’s House.
      • ACT III.
        • Scene I. A Room in Salvator’s House.
        • Scene II. A Street.
        • Scene III. A Wood.
      • Scene I. A Room in Salvator’s House.
      • Scene II. A Street.
      • Scene III. A Wood.
      • ACT IV.
        • Scene I. Antonio’s House.
        • Scene II. A Street.
        • Scene III. Frederick’s Chamber.
        • Scene IV. A Street.
        • Scene V. Antonio’s House.
      • Scene I. Antonio’s House.
      • Scene II. A Street.
      • Scene III. Frederick’s Chamber.
      • Scene IV. A Street.
      • Scene V. Antonio’s House.
      • ACT V.
        • Scene I. Laura’s Chamber.
        • Scene II. A Grove.
        • Scene III. The Lodgings of Curtius.
        • EPILOGUE,
        • Notes on the Text.
        • Notes: Critical And Explanatory.
        • Cross-Reference
      • Scene I. Laura’s Chamber.
      • Scene II. A Grove.
      • Scene III. The Lodgings of Curtius.
      • EPILOGUE,
      • Notes on the Text.
      • Notes: Critical And Explanatory.
      • Cross-Reference
    • SOURCE.
      • THEATRICAL HISTORY.
      • TO THE READER.
    • THEATRICAL HISTORY.
    • TO THE READER.
    • SIR PATIENT FANCY.
      • PROLOGUE,
      • DRAMATIS PERSONÆ.
    • PROLOGUE,
    • DRAMATIS PERSONÆ.
    • ACT I.
      • Scene I. A Room in Lady Knowell’s House.
      • A Chair and a Table. Enter Sir Credulous in a riding habit. Curry his Groom carrying a Portmantle.
    • Scene I. A Room in Lady Knowell’s House.
    • A Chair and a Table. Enter Sir Credulous in a riding habit. Curry his Groom carrying a Portmantle.
    • ACT II.
      • Scene I. A Garden to Sir Patient Fancy’s House.
      • Scene II. Changes to a Chamber.
    • Scene I. A Garden to Sir Patient Fancy’s House.
    • Scene II. Changes to a Chamber.
    • ACT III.
      • Scene I.
      • Scene II. Lady Knowell’s Chamber.
      • Scene III. A Garden.
      • Scene IV. Draws off, and discovers L. Fancy in her Night-gown, in a Chamber as by the dark.
      • Scene V. Changes again to a Garden.
      • A confused Noise of the Serenade, the Scene VI draws off to Lady Fancy’s Anti-chamber.
      • Scene VII. Changes to Lady Fancy’s Bed-chamber, discovers her as before; Lodwick as just risen in Disorder from the Bed, buttoning himself, and setting himself in order; and Noise at the Door of unlatching it.
      • The Scene draws over Sir Patient and Lady: draws again and discovers Scene VIII. The Garden, Wittmore, Fanny, and Isabella.
      • Scene IX. Changes to the long Street, a Pageant of an Elephant coming from the farther end with Sir Credulous on it, and several others playing on strange confused Instruments.
    • Scene I.
    • Scene II. Lady Knowell’s Chamber.
    • Scene III. A Garden.
    • Scene IV. Draws off, and discovers L. Fancy in her Night-gown, in a Chamber as by the dark.
    • Scene V. Changes again to a Garden.
    • A confused Noise of the Serenade, the Scene VI draws off to Lady Fancy’s Anti-chamber.
    • Scene VII. Changes to Lady Fancy’s Bed-chamber, discovers her as before; Lodwick as just risen in Disorder from the Bed, buttoning himself, and setting himself in order; and Noise at the Door of unlatching it.
    • The Scene draws over Sir Patient and Lady: draws again and discovers Scene VIII. The Garden, Wittmore, Fanny, and Isabella.
    • Scene IX. Changes to the long Street, a Pageant of an Elephant coming from the farther end with Sir Credulous on it, and several others playing on strange confused Instruments.
    • ACT IV.
      • Scene I. Lady Knowell’s House.
      • Scene II. A Chamber in Sir Patient Fancy’s House. A Table and Chairs.
      • Scene III. A Hall.
      • Scene IV. The Lady Fancy’s Bed-Chamber; she’s discover’d with Wittmore in disorder. A Table, Sword, and Hat.
    • Scene I. Lady Knowell’s House.
    • Scene II. A Chamber in Sir Patient Fancy’s House. A Table and Chairs.
    • Scene III. A Hall.
    • Scene IV. The Lady Fancy’s Bed-Chamber; she’s discover’d with Wittmore in disorder. A Table, Sword, and Hat.
    • ACT V.
      • Scene I. A Room in Sir Patient Fancy’s House. A Table, and six Chairs.
      • EPILOGUE,
      • Notes on the Text.
      • Notes: Critical And Explanatory.
      • Cross-References
      • Transcriber’s Footnote
    • Scene I. A Room in Sir Patient Fancy’s House. A Table, and six Chairs.
    • EPILOGUE,
    • Notes on the Text.
    • Notes: Critical And Explanatory.
    • Cross-References
    • Transcriber’s Footnote
    • THE AMOROUS PRINCE.
      • ARGUMENT.
      • SOURCE.
      • THEATRICAL HISTORY.
    • ARGUMENT.
    • SOURCE.
    • THEATRICAL HISTORY.
    • THE AMOROUS PRINCE.
      • PROLOGUE.
      • DRAMATIS PERSONÆ.
      • SCENE, The Court of Florence.
    • PROLOGUE.
    • DRAMATIS PERSONÆ.
    • SCENE, The Court of Florence.
    • ACT I.
      • Scene I. The Chamber of Cloris.
      • Scene II. A Grove.
      • Scene III. The Apartment of Antonio.
      • Scene IV. The Same.
    • Scene I. The Chamber of Cloris.
    • Scene II. A Grove.
    • Scene III. The Apartment of Antonio.
    • Scene IV. The Same.
    • ACT II.
      • Scene I. The Apartment of Frederick.
      • Scene II. Antonio’s House.
      • Scene III. The Street.
      • Scene IV. Antonio’s House.
      • Scene V. A Chamber in Alberto’s House.
    • Scene I. The Apartment of Frederick.
    • Scene II. Antonio’s House.
    • Scene III. The Street.
    • Scene IV. Antonio’s House.
    • Scene V. A Chamber in Alberto’s House.
    • ACT III.
      • Scene I. A Room in Salvator’s House.
      • Scene II. A Street.
      • Scene III. A Wood.
    • Scene I. A Room in Salvator’s House.
    • Scene II. A Street.
    • Scene III. A Wood.
    • ACT IV.
      • Scene I. Antonio’s House.
      • Scene II. A Street.
      • Scene III. Frederick’s Chamber.
      • Scene IV. A Street.
      • Scene V. Antonio’s House.
    • Scene I. Antonio’s House.
    • Scene II. A Street.
    • Scene III. Frederick’s Chamber.
    • Scene IV. A Street.
    • Scene V. Antonio’s House.
    • ACT V.
      • Scene I. Laura’s Chamber.
      • Scene II. A Grove.
      • Scene III. The Lodgings of Curtius.
      • EPILOGUE,
      • Notes on the Text.
      • Notes: Critical And Explanatory.
      • Cross-Reference
    • Scene I. Laura’s Chamber.
    • Scene II. A Grove.
    • Scene III. The Lodgings of Curtius.
    • EPILOGUE,
    • Notes on the Text.
    • Notes: Critical And Explanatory.
    • Cross-Reference
  • THE WIDOW RANTER.
    • ARGUMENT.
      • SOURCE.
        • THEATRICAL HISTORY.
        • To the much Honoured  MADAM WELLDON.
      • THEATRICAL HISTORY.
      • To the much Honoured  MADAM WELLDON.
      • THE WIDOW RANTER: Or, the History of Bacon in Virginia.
        • PROLOGUE,
        • DRAMATIS PERSONÆ.
        • SCENE, Virginia: in Bacon’s Camp, James-Town and the surrounding Country.
      • PROLOGUE,
      • DRAMATIS PERSONÆ.
      • SCENE, Virginia: in Bacon’s Camp, James-Town and the surrounding Country.
      • ACT I.
        • Scene I. A Room with several Tables.
        • Scene II. The Council-Table.
        • Scene III. Surelove’s House.
      • Scene I. A Room with several Tables.
      • Scene II. The Council-Table.
      • Scene III. Surelove’s House.
      • ACT II.
        • Scene I. A Pavilion.
        • Scene II. The Widow Ranter’s Hall.
        • Scene III. A Sevana, or large Heath.
        • Scene IV. The Council-Table.
      • Scene I. A Pavilion.
      • Scene II. The Widow Ranter’s Hall.
      • Scene III. A Sevana, or large Heath.
      • Scene IV. The Council-Table.
      • ACT III.
        • Scene I. The Country Court, a great Table, with Papers, a Clerk writing.
        • Scene II. The Sevana or Heath.
      • Scene I. The Country Court, a great Table, with Papers, a Clerk writing.
      • Scene II. The Sevana or Heath.
      • ACT IV.
        • Scene I.
        • Scene II.
        • Scene III. A Tent.
      • Scene I.
      • Scene II.
      • Scene III. A Tent.
      • ACT V.
        • Scene I. The Sevana in sight of the Camp; the Moon rises.
        • Scene II. Changes to Wellman’s Tent.
        • Scene III. A thick Wood.
        • Scene IV. Changes to another part of the Wood.
        • Scene V. A Grove near Madam Surelove’s.
        • EPILOGUE.
        • Notes on the Text.
        • Notes: Critical And Explanatory.
        • Cross-References
      • Scene I. The Sevana in sight of the Camp; the Moon rises.
      • Scene II. Changes to Wellman’s Tent.
      • Scene III. A thick Wood.
      • Scene IV. Changes to another part of the Wood.
      • Scene V. A Grove near Madam Surelove’s.
      • EPILOGUE.
      • Notes on the Text.
      • Notes: Critical And Explanatory.
      • Cross-References
      • THE YOUNGER BROTHER; OR, THE AMOROUS JILT.
        • ARGUMENT.
        • SOURCE.
        • THEATRICAL HISTORY.
        • THE EPISTLE DEDICATORY  TO Collonel Codrington.
      • ARGUMENT.
      • SOURCE.
      • THEATRICAL HISTORY.
      • THE EPISTLE DEDICATORY  TO Collonel Codrington.
      • THE YOUNGER BROTHER; or, The Amorous Jilt.
        • PROLOGUE,
        • DRAMATIS PERSONÆ.
      • PROLOGUE,
      • DRAMATIS PERSONÆ.
      • ACT I.
        • Scene I. A Chamber.
        • Scene II. A Chamber.
      • Scene I. A Chamber.
      • Scene II. A Chamber.
      • ACT II.
        • Scene I. Sir Rowland’s Lodging.
        • Scene II. A Chamber.
        • Scene III. Another Chamber.
      • Scene I. Sir Rowland’s Lodging.
      • Scene II. A Chamber.
      • Scene III. Another Chamber.
      • ACT III.
        • Scene I. A rich Chamber.
        • Scene II. A Chamber, and Alcove, discovers Mirtilla and Prince Frederick.
        • Scene III. A Garden by Night still.
      • Scene I. A rich Chamber.
      • Scene II. A Chamber, and Alcove, discovers Mirtilla and Prince Frederick.
      • Scene III. A Garden by Night still.
      • ACT IV.
        • Scene I. The Prince’s Lodgings.
        • Scene II. Draws off, discovers Mirtilla at her Toylet, dress’d.
        • Scene III. Changes to Lady Youthly’s.
      • Scene I. The Prince’s Lodgings.
      • Scene II. Draws off, discovers Mirtilla at her Toylet, dress’d.
      • Scene III. Changes to Lady Youthly’s.
      • ACT V.
        • Scene I. Welborn’s Chamber.
        • Scene II. The Dressing-Room. Discovers the Prince at his Toylet, dressing. Musick and a Song.
        • Scene III. A Chamber.
        • Scene IV. My Lady Youthly’s; Discovers her, and Lettice dressing her.
        • EPILOGUE.
        • Notes on the Text.
        • Notes: Critical And Explanatory.
        • Cross-References
      • Scene I. Welborn’s Chamber.
      • Scene II. The Dressing-Room. Discovers the Prince at his Toylet, dressing. Musick and a Song.
      • Scene III. A Chamber.
      • Scene IV. My Lady Youthly’s; Discovers her, and Lettice dressing her.
      • EPILOGUE.
      • Notes on the Text.
      • Notes: Critical And Explanatory.
      • Cross-References
    • SOURCE.
      • THEATRICAL HISTORY.
      • To the much Honoured  MADAM WELLDON.
    • THEATRICAL HISTORY.
    • To the much Honoured  MADAM WELLDON.
    • THE WIDOW RANTER: Or, the History of Bacon in Virginia.
      • PROLOGUE,
      • DRAMATIS PERSONÆ.
      • SCENE, Virginia: in Bacon’s Camp, James-Town and the surrounding Country.
    • PROLOGUE,
    • DRAMATIS PERSONÆ.
    • SCENE, Virginia: in Bacon’s Camp, James-Town and the surrounding Country.
    • ACT I.
      • Scene I. A Room with several Tables.
      • Scene II. The Council-Table.
      • Scene III. Surelove’s House.
    • Scene I. A Room with several Tables.
    • Scene II. The Council-Table.
    • Scene III. Surelove’s House.
    • ACT II.
      • Scene I. A Pavilion.
      • Scene II. The Widow Ranter’s Hall.
      • Scene III. A Sevana, or large Heath.
      • Scene IV. The Council-Table.
    • Scene I. A Pavilion.
    • Scene II. The Widow Ranter’s Hall.
    • Scene III. A Sevana, or large Heath.
    • Scene IV. The Council-Table.
    • ACT III.
      • Scene I. The Country Court, a great Table, with Papers, a Clerk writing.
      • Scene II. The Sevana or Heath.
    • Scene I. The Country Court, a great Table, with Papers, a Clerk writing.
    • Scene II. The Sevana or Heath.
    • ACT IV.
      • Scene I.
      • Scene II.
      • Scene III. A Tent.
    • Scene I.
    • Scene II.
    • Scene III. A Tent.
    • ACT V.
      • Scene I. The Sevana in sight of the Camp; the Moon rises.
      • Scene II. Changes to Wellman’s Tent.
      • Scene III. A thick Wood.
      • Scene IV. Changes to another part of the Wood.
      • Scene V. A Grove near Madam Surelove’s.
      • EPILOGUE.
      • Notes on the Text.
      • Notes: Critical And Explanatory.
      • Cross-References
    • Scene I. The Sevana in sight of the Camp; the Moon rises.
    • Scene II. Changes to Wellman’s Tent.
    • Scene III. A thick Wood.
    • Scene IV. Changes to another part of the Wood.
    • Scene V. A Grove near Madam Surelove’s.
    • EPILOGUE.
    • Notes on the Text.
    • Notes: Critical And Explanatory.
    • Cross-References
    • THE YOUNGER BROTHER; OR, THE AMOROUS JILT.
      • ARGUMENT.
      • SOURCE.
      • THEATRICAL HISTORY.
      • THE EPISTLE DEDICATORY  TO Collonel Codrington.
    • ARGUMENT.
    • SOURCE.
    • THEATRICAL HISTORY.
    • THE EPISTLE DEDICATORY  TO Collonel Codrington.
    • THE YOUNGER BROTHER; or, The Amorous Jilt.
      • PROLOGUE,
      • DRAMATIS PERSONÆ.
    • PROLOGUE,
    • DRAMATIS PERSONÆ.
    • ACT I.
      • Scene I. A Chamber.
      • Scene II. A Chamber.
    • Scene I. A Chamber.
    • Scene II. A Chamber.
    • ACT II.
      • Scene I. Sir Rowland’s Lodging.
      • Scene II. A Chamber.
      • Scene III. Another Chamber.
    • Scene I. Sir Rowland’s Lodging.
    • Scene II. A Chamber.
    • Scene III. Another Chamber.
    • ACT III.
      • Scene I. A rich Chamber.
      • Scene II. A Chamber, and Alcove, discovers Mirtilla and Prince Frederick.
      • Scene III. A Garden by Night still.
    • Scene I. A rich Chamber.
    • Scene II. A Chamber, and Alcove, discovers Mirtilla and Prince Frederick.
    • Scene III. A Garden by Night still.
    • ACT IV.
      • Scene I. The Prince’s Lodgings.
      • Scene II. Draws off, discovers Mirtilla at her Toylet, dress’d.
      • Scene III. Changes to Lady Youthly’s.
    • Scene I. The Prince’s Lodgings.
    • Scene II. Draws off, discovers Mirtilla at her Toylet, dress’d.
    • Scene III. Changes to Lady Youthly’s.
    • ACT V.
      • Scene I. Welborn’s Chamber.
      • Scene II. The Dressing-Room. Discovers the Prince at his Toylet, dressing. Musick and a Song.
      • Scene III. A Chamber.
      • Scene IV. My Lady Youthly’s; Discovers her, and Lettice dressing her.
      • EPILOGUE.
      • Notes on the Text.
      • Notes: Critical And Explanatory.
      • Cross-References
    • Scene I. Welborn’s Chamber.
    • Scene II. The Dressing-Room. Discovers the Prince at his Toylet, dressing. Musick and a Song.
    • Scene III. A Chamber.
    • Scene IV. My Lady Youthly’s; Discovers her, and Lettice dressing her.
    • EPILOGUE.
    • Notes on the Text.
    • Notes: Critical And Explanatory.
    • Cross-References
  • THE WORKS
    • APHRA BEHN
      • CONTENTS.
        • Arrangement of Editor’s Notes
      • Arrangement of Editor’s Notes
    • CONTENTS.
      • Arrangement of Editor’s Notes
    • Arrangement of Editor’s Notes
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