The Childrens' Story of the War, Volume 1 (of 10) From the Beginning of the War to the Landing of the British Army in France
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The Childrens' Story of the War, Volume 1 (of 10) From the Beginning of the War to the Landing of the British Army in France

By Edward Parrott
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Table of Contents
  • THE CHILDREN'S STORY OF THE WAR
    • How the Boy Scouts helped.
      • The war found the Boy Scouts true to their motto, "Be Prepared." In London alone 25,000 Scouts were organised to help the various Government departments by acting as messengers. Along the south and east coasts nearly 3,000 went on duty to guard culverts, telephone and telegraph lines, railway stations, reservoirs, etc. Numbers of Scouts also worked as harvesters in the place of men who had joined the Army. The boys above are "doing their little bit" by carrying soldiers' baggage to the railway station.
    • The war found the Boy Scouts true to their motto, "Be Prepared." In London alone 25,000 Scouts were organised to help the various Government departments by acting as messengers. Along the south and east coasts nearly 3,000 went on duty to guard culverts, telephone and telegraph lines, railway stations, reservoirs, etc. Numbers of Scouts also worked as harvesters in the place of men who had joined the Army. The boys above are "doing their little bit" by carrying soldiers' baggage to the railway station.
  • THE CHILDREN'S STORY OF THE WAR
    • BY
      • SIR EDWARD PARROTT, M.A., LL.D.
        • AUTHOR OF "BRITAIN OVERSEAS," "THE PAGEANT OF ENGLISH LITERATURE," ETC.
      • AUTHOR OF "BRITAIN OVERSEAS," "THE PAGEANT OF ENGLISH LITERATURE," ETC.
      • From the Beginning of the War to the Landing of the British Army in France
      • THOMAS NELSON AND SONS, Ltd. LONDON, EDINBURGH, PARIS, AND NEW YORK
    • SIR EDWARD PARROTT, M.A., LL.D.
      • AUTHOR OF "BRITAIN OVERSEAS," "THE PAGEANT OF ENGLISH LITERATURE," ETC.
    • AUTHOR OF "BRITAIN OVERSEAS," "THE PAGEANT OF ENGLISH LITERATURE," ETC.
    • From the Beginning of the War to the Landing of the British Army in France
    • THOMAS NELSON AND SONS, Ltd. LONDON, EDINBURGH, PARIS, AND NEW YORK
    • THIS STORY OF THE GREAT WAR
      • recounting for Children the Triumphs of British Valour and Endurance by Land and Sea
      • is
    • recounting for Children the Triumphs of British Valour and Endurance by Land and Sea
    • is
    • DEDICATED
      • to
    • to
  • H. R. H. PRINCE GEORGE.
    • CONTENTS
    • CHAPTER I.
      • A BOLT FROM THE BLUE.
      • In the Summer Holidays.
        • A scene on the Thames at Henley Regatta, held every year in the month of July. (From a photograph by the Sport and General Press Agency.)
      • A scene on the Thames at Henley Regatta, held every year in the month of July. (From a photograph by the Sport and General Press Agency.)
      • War.
        • (From the picture by Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A., in the National Gallery of British Art.)
        • Servia is a land of peasant soldiers. Here you see some of them coming into Belgrade to join the colours.    Photo, Topical.
        • This map shows what Servia would become if Bosnia and Herzegovina were to be united with her.
        • Franz Josef, Emperor of Austria.    Photo by C. Pietzner.
        • The Archduke Francis Ferdinand, the Archduchess, and their family.
        • View in the old part of Sarajevo, the capital of Bosnia.
        • Austrian soldiers on the bank of the Danube, opposite to Belgrade. By permission of the Sphere.
      • (From the picture by Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A., in the National Gallery of British Art.)
      • Servia is a land of peasant soldiers. Here you see some of them coming into Belgrade to join the colours.    Photo, Topical.
      • This map shows what Servia would become if Bosnia and Herzegovina were to be united with her.
      • Franz Josef, Emperor of Austria.    Photo by C. Pietzner.
      • The Archduke Francis Ferdinand, the Archduchess, and their family.
      • View in the old part of Sarajevo, the capital of Bosnia.
      • Austrian soldiers on the bank of the Danube, opposite to Belgrade. By permission of the Sphere.
    • A BOLT FROM THE BLUE.
    • In the Summer Holidays.
      • A scene on the Thames at Henley Regatta, held every year in the month of July. (From a photograph by the Sport and General Press Agency.)
    • A scene on the Thames at Henley Regatta, held every year in the month of July. (From a photograph by the Sport and General Press Agency.)
    • War.
      • (From the picture by Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A., in the National Gallery of British Art.)
      • Servia is a land of peasant soldiers. Here you see some of them coming into Belgrade to join the colours.    Photo, Topical.
      • This map shows what Servia would become if Bosnia and Herzegovina were to be united with her.
      • Franz Josef, Emperor of Austria.    Photo by C. Pietzner.
      • The Archduke Francis Ferdinand, the Archduchess, and their family.
      • View in the old part of Sarajevo, the capital of Bosnia.
      • Austrian soldiers on the bank of the Danube, opposite to Belgrade. By permission of the Sphere.
    • (From the picture by Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A., in the National Gallery of British Art.)
    • Servia is a land of peasant soldiers. Here you see some of them coming into Belgrade to join the colours.    Photo, Topical.
    • This map shows what Servia would become if Bosnia and Herzegovina were to be united with her.
    • Franz Josef, Emperor of Austria.    Photo by C. Pietzner.
    • The Archduke Francis Ferdinand, the Archduchess, and their family.
    • View in the old part of Sarajevo, the capital of Bosnia.
    • Austrian soldiers on the bank of the Danube, opposite to Belgrade. By permission of the Sphere.
    • CHAPTER II.
      • THE SEETHING WHIRLPOOL.
        • Vienna, the capital of Austria, heart and centre of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.
        • King George V. in the uniform of a British admiral. Photo, W. and D. Downey.
        • H.M.S. Colossus firing a salute.    Photo, Cribb.
        • The sure shield of Britain—a scene at the Naval Review.    Photo, Cribb.
        • Prince Albert, the King's second son, as a midshipman. This photograph was taken during the King's inspection of the Fleet. Photo, Ernest Brooks.
        • The city of Belgrade.    Photo, Exclusive News Agency.
        • The King and Crown Prince of Servia.    Photo, Topical.
      • Vienna, the capital of Austria, heart and centre of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.
      • King George V. in the uniform of a British admiral. Photo, W. and D. Downey.
      • H.M.S. Colossus firing a salute.    Photo, Cribb.
      • The sure shield of Britain—a scene at the Naval Review.    Photo, Cribb.
      • Prince Albert, the King's second son, as a midshipman. This photograph was taken during the King's inspection of the Fleet. Photo, Ernest Brooks.
      • The city of Belgrade.    Photo, Exclusive News Agency.
      • The King and Crown Prince of Servia.    Photo, Topical.
      • The Czar of Russia and President Poincaré.
        • This photograph was taken on board the Czar's yacht when President Poincaré visited Russia in the middle of July.    (Photo, Record.)
      • This photograph was taken on board the Czar's yacht when President Poincaré visited Russia in the middle of July.    (Photo, Record.)
      • For Fatherland.
        • This beautiful picture, which hangs in the Luxembourg Palace in Paris, illustrates the sacrifice which Frenchmen are always ready to make for their dearly loved native land.
      • This beautiful picture, which hangs in the Luxembourg Palace in Paris, illustrates the sacrifice which Frenchmen are always ready to make for their dearly loved native land.
    • THE SEETHING WHIRLPOOL.
      • Vienna, the capital of Austria, heart and centre of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.
      • King George V. in the uniform of a British admiral. Photo, W. and D. Downey.
      • H.M.S. Colossus firing a salute.    Photo, Cribb.
      • The sure shield of Britain—a scene at the Naval Review.    Photo, Cribb.
      • Prince Albert, the King's second son, as a midshipman. This photograph was taken during the King's inspection of the Fleet. Photo, Ernest Brooks.
      • The city of Belgrade.    Photo, Exclusive News Agency.
      • The King and Crown Prince of Servia.    Photo, Topical.
    • Vienna, the capital of Austria, heart and centre of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.
    • King George V. in the uniform of a British admiral. Photo, W. and D. Downey.
    • H.M.S. Colossus firing a salute.    Photo, Cribb.
    • The sure shield of Britain—a scene at the Naval Review.    Photo, Cribb.
    • Prince Albert, the King's second son, as a midshipman. This photograph was taken during the King's inspection of the Fleet. Photo, Ernest Brooks.
    • The city of Belgrade.    Photo, Exclusive News Agency.
    • The King and Crown Prince of Servia.    Photo, Topical.
    • The Czar of Russia and President Poincaré.
      • This photograph was taken on board the Czar's yacht when President Poincaré visited Russia in the middle of July.    (Photo, Record.)
    • This photograph was taken on board the Czar's yacht when President Poincaré visited Russia in the middle of July.    (Photo, Record.)
    • For Fatherland.
      • This beautiful picture, which hangs in the Luxembourg Palace in Paris, illustrates the sacrifice which Frenchmen are always ready to make for their dearly loved native land.
    • This beautiful picture, which hangs in the Luxembourg Palace in Paris, illustrates the sacrifice which Frenchmen are always ready to make for their dearly loved native land.
    • CHAPTER III.
      • THE BEGINNINGS OF PRUSSIA.
      • The Kaiser Wilhelm and the Emperor Franz Josef.
        • Photo, Topical Press.
      • Photo, Topical Press.
      • Map of Modern Germany.
      • Statue of the Great Elector in Berlin.
        • The present Kaiser is devoted to the memory of his ancestors, and does everything in his power to make the Prussians believe that they owe everything to the Hohenzollern sovereigns. Berlin is full of statues to these princes. In one of the avenues of the chief park there is a row of statues to all the rulers of Prussia. Of the Great Elector, who was the real founder of Prussia, and whose statue is shown above, the Kaiser has said, "He has stood before me as the example of my youth." He is also a great admirer of Frederick the Great, and has imitated some of the worst features of that monarch. Photo, Exclusive News Agency.
      • The present Kaiser is devoted to the memory of his ancestors, and does everything in his power to make the Prussians believe that they owe everything to the Hohenzollern sovereigns. Berlin is full of statues to these princes. In one of the avenues of the chief park there is a row of statues to all the rulers of Prussia. Of the Great Elector, who was the real founder of Prussia, and whose statue is shown above, the Kaiser has said, "He has stood before me as the example of my youth." He is also a great admirer of Frederick the Great, and has imitated some of the worst features of that monarch. Photo, Exclusive News Agency.
      • One of the Potsdam Guards.
      • Maria Theresa and the Hungarian Nobles.
        • When Frederick the Great was about to invade Silesia, Maria Theresa, holding her young son in her arms, begged the Hungarian nobles to fight for her. With one accord they drew their swords and cried, "Let us die for our king, Maria Theresa!"
      • When Frederick the Great was about to invade Silesia, Maria Theresa, holding her young son in her arms, begged the Hungarian nobles to fight for her. With one accord they drew their swords and cried, "Let us die for our king, Maria Theresa!"
      • Frederick the Great visiting his People.
        • (From the picture by von Menzel.)
      • (From the picture by von Menzel.)
    • THE BEGINNINGS OF PRUSSIA.
    • The Kaiser Wilhelm and the Emperor Franz Josef.
      • Photo, Topical Press.
    • Photo, Topical Press.
    • Map of Modern Germany.
    • Statue of the Great Elector in Berlin.
      • The present Kaiser is devoted to the memory of his ancestors, and does everything in his power to make the Prussians believe that they owe everything to the Hohenzollern sovereigns. Berlin is full of statues to these princes. In one of the avenues of the chief park there is a row of statues to all the rulers of Prussia. Of the Great Elector, who was the real founder of Prussia, and whose statue is shown above, the Kaiser has said, "He has stood before me as the example of my youth." He is also a great admirer of Frederick the Great, and has imitated some of the worst features of that monarch. Photo, Exclusive News Agency.
    • The present Kaiser is devoted to the memory of his ancestors, and does everything in his power to make the Prussians believe that they owe everything to the Hohenzollern sovereigns. Berlin is full of statues to these princes. In one of the avenues of the chief park there is a row of statues to all the rulers of Prussia. Of the Great Elector, who was the real founder of Prussia, and whose statue is shown above, the Kaiser has said, "He has stood before me as the example of my youth." He is also a great admirer of Frederick the Great, and has imitated some of the worst features of that monarch. Photo, Exclusive News Agency.
    • One of the Potsdam Guards.
    • Maria Theresa and the Hungarian Nobles.
      • When Frederick the Great was about to invade Silesia, Maria Theresa, holding her young son in her arms, begged the Hungarian nobles to fight for her. With one accord they drew their swords and cried, "Let us die for our king, Maria Theresa!"
    • When Frederick the Great was about to invade Silesia, Maria Theresa, holding her young son in her arms, begged the Hungarian nobles to fight for her. With one accord they drew their swords and cried, "Let us die for our king, Maria Theresa!"
    • Frederick the Great visiting his People.
      • (From the picture by von Menzel.)
    • (From the picture by von Menzel.)
    • CHAPTER IV.
      • THE GREAT WAR LORD OF EUROPE.
      • The Kaiser and his Troops in the Unter den Linden.
        • Photo, Exclusive News Agency.
      • Photo, Exclusive News Agency.
      • The Attack on the Bastille.    From a contemporary print.
      • French nobles and gentry waiting the call to execution.
    • THE GREAT WAR LORD OF EUROPE.
    • The Kaiser and his Troops in the Unter den Linden.
      • Photo, Exclusive News Agency.
    • Photo, Exclusive News Agency.
    • The Attack on the Bastille.    From a contemporary print.
    • French nobles and gentry waiting the call to execution.
    • THE MARSEILLAISE HYMN.
      • Rouget de Lisle singing "The Marseillaise."
        • (From the painting by Pils, in the Louvre Gallery. Photo by Mansell.)
      • (From the painting by Pils, in the Louvre Gallery. Photo by Mansell.)
      • Napoleon at School.
        • When Napoleon was a boy at a French military school he was jeered at by his fellows, who called him a surly Corsican.
      • When Napoleon was a boy at a French military school he was jeered at by his fellows, who called him a surly Corsican.
      • Napoleon at Austerlitz.
      • Napoleon with King Frederick William III. and Queen Louisa at Tilsit.
        • From the picture by von Gros.
      • From the picture by von Gros.
      • The Retreat of Napoleon from Moscow.
        • (After the picture by Meissonier.)
      • (After the picture by Meissonier.)
    • Rouget de Lisle singing "The Marseillaise."
      • (From the painting by Pils, in the Louvre Gallery. Photo by Mansell.)
    • (From the painting by Pils, in the Louvre Gallery. Photo by Mansell.)
    • Napoleon at School.
      • When Napoleon was a boy at a French military school he was jeered at by his fellows, who called him a surly Corsican.
    • When Napoleon was a boy at a French military school he was jeered at by his fellows, who called him a surly Corsican.
    • Napoleon at Austerlitz.
    • Napoleon with King Frederick William III. and Queen Louisa at Tilsit.
      • From the picture by von Gros.
    • From the picture by von Gros.
    • The Retreat of Napoleon from Moscow.
      • (After the picture by Meissonier.)
    • (After the picture by Meissonier.)
    • CHAPTER V.
      • HOW THE GREAT WAR LORD FELL.
      • The Prussians fighting their way through the village of Planchenoit to reach the field of Waterloo.
        • (From the picture by Von Udolf Northen.)
      • (From the picture by Von Udolf Northen.)
      • Map of Northern Europe.
        • The thick lines show the chief trade routes.
      • The thick lines show the chief trade routes.
      • The last days of the man who tried to make himself Master of the World.
        • This picture, which is by the famous French artist Paul Delaroche, shows Napoleon at St. Helena.
      • This picture, which is by the famous French artist Paul Delaroche, shows Napoleon at St. Helena.
      • Preparing the famous signal at Trafalgar.    From the picture by Thomas Davidson.
        • Just before the battle began, Nelson ordered the famous signal to be made: "England expects every man to do his duty."
      • Just before the battle began, Nelson ordered the famous signal to be made: "England expects every man to do his duty."
    • HOW THE GREAT WAR LORD FELL.
    • The Prussians fighting their way through the village of Planchenoit to reach the field of Waterloo.
      • (From the picture by Von Udolf Northen.)
    • (From the picture by Von Udolf Northen.)
    • Map of Northern Europe.
      • The thick lines show the chief trade routes.
    • The thick lines show the chief trade routes.
    • The last days of the man who tried to make himself Master of the World.
      • This picture, which is by the famous French artist Paul Delaroche, shows Napoleon at St. Helena.
    • This picture, which is by the famous French artist Paul Delaroche, shows Napoleon at St. Helena.
    • Preparing the famous signal at Trafalgar.    From the picture by Thomas Davidson.
      • Just before the battle began, Nelson ordered the famous signal to be made: "England expects every man to do his duty."
    • Just before the battle began, Nelson ordered the famous signal to be made: "England expects every man to do his duty."
    • CHAPTER VI.
      • THE MAN OF BLOOD AND IRON.
      • Otto von Bismarck.
        • (From the picture by Franz von Lenbach.) This portrait shows Bismarck at a time when he was practically ruler of Prussia.
      • (From the picture by Franz von Lenbach.) This portrait shows Bismarck at a time when he was practically ruler of Prussia.
      • The Coronation of William I. of Prussia in the Cathedral of Königsberg on October 18, 1861.
        • (From the picture by Adolf von Menzel.)
      • (From the picture by Adolf von Menzel.)
    • THE MAN OF BLOOD AND IRON.
    • Otto von Bismarck.
      • (From the picture by Franz von Lenbach.) This portrait shows Bismarck at a time when he was practically ruler of Prussia.
    • (From the picture by Franz von Lenbach.) This portrait shows Bismarck at a time when he was practically ruler of Prussia.
    • The Coronation of William I. of Prussia in the Cathedral of Königsberg on October 18, 1861.
      • (From the picture by Adolf von Menzel.)
    • (From the picture by Adolf von Menzel.)
    • CHAPTER VII.
      • CLEARING THE PATH.
      • Chief of the Staff General von Moltke (nephew of the great General who trained the Prussian Army for the wars against Denmark, Austria, and France).
        • He is here seen with the Kaiser Wilhelm watching the manoeuvres of German troops. (Photo, Oscar Tellgmann.)
      • He is here seen with the Kaiser Wilhelm watching the manoeuvres of German troops. (Photo, Oscar Tellgmann.)
      • Cross of the Legion of Honour.
      • Place de la Concorde.
    • CLEARING THE PATH.
    • Chief of the Staff General von Moltke (nephew of the great General who trained the Prussian Army for the wars against Denmark, Austria, and France).
      • He is here seen with the Kaiser Wilhelm watching the manoeuvres of German troops. (Photo, Oscar Tellgmann.)
    • He is here seen with the Kaiser Wilhelm watching the manoeuvres of German troops. (Photo, Oscar Tellgmann.)
    • Cross of the Legion of Honour.
    • Place de la Concorde.
    • CHAPTER VIII.
      • PREPARING FOR WAR.
      • The Battle of Magenta (June 4, 1859).
        • This picture represents the second attack by the French soldiers known as Zouaves on the town of Magenta, 15 miles west of Milan, in that part of N. Italy known as Lombardy. A French officer carrying the flag of his regiment is seen leading his men on to victory. (From the picture by Yvon. In the Versailles Gallery.)
      • This picture represents the second attack by the French soldiers known as Zouaves on the town of Magenta, 15 miles west of Milan, in that part of N. Italy known as Lombardy. A French officer carrying the flag of his regiment is seen leading his men on to victory. (From the picture by Yvon. In the Versailles Gallery.)
      • Belgian Soldiers of to-day.    Photo, Sport and General.
        • Notice the dogs drawing the machine guns.
      • Notice the dogs drawing the machine guns.
    • PREPARING FOR WAR.
    • The Battle of Magenta (June 4, 1859).
      • This picture represents the second attack by the French soldiers known as Zouaves on the town of Magenta, 15 miles west of Milan, in that part of N. Italy known as Lombardy. A French officer carrying the flag of his regiment is seen leading his men on to victory. (From the picture by Yvon. In the Versailles Gallery.)
    • This picture represents the second attack by the French soldiers known as Zouaves on the town of Magenta, 15 miles west of Milan, in that part of N. Italy known as Lombardy. A French officer carrying the flag of his regiment is seen leading his men on to victory. (From the picture by Yvon. In the Versailles Gallery.)
    • Belgian Soldiers of to-day.    Photo, Sport and General.
      • Notice the dogs drawing the machine guns.
    • Notice the dogs drawing the machine guns.
    • CHAPTER IX.
      • "THE COCKPIT OF EUROPE."
    • "THE COCKPIT OF EUROPE."
    • CHAPTER X.
      • A TERRIBLE STRUGGLE.
      • Napoleon III.
        • (From the painting by J. H. Flandrin at Versailles.)
      • (From the painting by J. H. Flandrin at Versailles.)
      • The Germans at Gravelotte.    From the picture by E. J. Hünten.
      • Metz as it was in 1870.    From the picture by Meyret.
      • Advance of the German Grenadiers at Nuits.
        • (From the picture by G. Emelé.) [This battle took place near Dijon, in December 1870.]
      • (From the picture by G. Emelé.) [This battle took place near Dijon, in December 1870.]
      • The Defence of Paris.    From the picture by J. L. Meissonier.
        • [This picture does not represent an actual scene, but is intended to illustrate the heroism of the defenders who freely gave their lives for their city and country. France is shown in the centre of the picture as a female figure. The angel of destruction, attended by a carrion crow is seen on the upper corner on the left.]
      • [This picture does not represent an actual scene, but is intended to illustrate the heroism of the defenders who freely gave their lives for their city and country. France is shown in the centre of the picture as a female figure. The angel of destruction, attended by a carrion crow is seen on the upper corner on the left.]
    • A TERRIBLE STRUGGLE.
    • Napoleon III.
      • (From the painting by J. H. Flandrin at Versailles.)
    • (From the painting by J. H. Flandrin at Versailles.)
    • The Germans at Gravelotte.    From the picture by E. J. Hünten.
    • Metz as it was in 1870.    From the picture by Meyret.
    • Advance of the German Grenadiers at Nuits.
      • (From the picture by G. Emelé.) [This battle took place near Dijon, in December 1870.]
    • (From the picture by G. Emelé.) [This battle took place near Dijon, in December 1870.]
    • The Defence of Paris.    From the picture by J. L. Meissonier.
      • [This picture does not represent an actual scene, but is intended to illustrate the heroism of the defenders who freely gave their lives for their city and country. France is shown in the centre of the picture as a female figure. The angel of destruction, attended by a carrion crow is seen on the upper corner on the left.]
    • [This picture does not represent an actual scene, but is intended to illustrate the heroism of the defenders who freely gave their lives for their city and country. France is shown in the centre of the picture as a female figure. The angel of destruction, attended by a carrion crow is seen on the upper corner on the left.]
    • CHAPTER XI.
      • FRANCE UNDER THE HARROW.
      • Proclaiming the German Emperor at Versailles, January 18, 1871.
        • From the picture by Anton von Werner. 1. Duke Ernest of Saxe-Coburg-Gortha. 2. Crown Prince, afterwards Frederick II. 3. William I. 4. Grand Duke of Boden. 5. Bismark. 6. Molke.
      • From the picture by Anton von Werner. 1. Duke Ernest of Saxe-Coburg-Gortha. 2. Crown Prince, afterwards Frederick II. 3. William I. 4. Grand Duke of Boden. 5. Bismark. 6. Molke.
      • General Joffre, Commander-in-Chief of the French Armies.
      • Field-Marshal Lord Kitchener, British Secretary for War.
      • Alsace.
        • (From the picture by Henriette Browne.)
      • (From the picture by Henriette Browne.)
    • FRANCE UNDER THE HARROW.
    • Proclaiming the German Emperor at Versailles, January 18, 1871.
      • From the picture by Anton von Werner. 1. Duke Ernest of Saxe-Coburg-Gortha. 2. Crown Prince, afterwards Frederick II. 3. William I. 4. Grand Duke of Boden. 5. Bismark. 6. Molke.
    • From the picture by Anton von Werner. 1. Duke Ernest of Saxe-Coburg-Gortha. 2. Crown Prince, afterwards Frederick II. 3. William I. 4. Grand Duke of Boden. 5. Bismark. 6. Molke.
    • General Joffre, Commander-in-Chief of the French Armies.
    • Field-Marshal Lord Kitchener, British Secretary for War.
    • Alsace.
      • (From the picture by Henriette Browne.)
    • (From the picture by Henriette Browne.)
    • CHAPTER XII.
      • THE BOYHOOD OF THE KAISER.
      • Prince William (afterwards Emperor William I.) with his wife and family at the Castle of Babelsberg.
        • [The little boy with the sword afterwards became the Crown Prince and the father of the present Kaiser.]
      • [The little boy with the sword afterwards became the Crown Prince and the father of the present Kaiser.]
      • Views in Potsdam.
        • 1. Palace of Sans-Souci. 2. Castle of Babelsberg. 3. Brandenburg Gate. 4. The Orangery. 5. The New Palace.
      • 1. Palace of Sans-Souci. 2. Castle of Babelsberg. 3. Brandenburg Gate. 4. The Orangery. 5. The New Palace.
      • The Prussian Guard, the flower of the German army, and the pride of the Kaiser.
        • Photo, Record Press.
      • Photo, Record Press.
    • THE BOYHOOD OF THE KAISER.
    • Prince William (afterwards Emperor William I.) with his wife and family at the Castle of Babelsberg.
      • [The little boy with the sword afterwards became the Crown Prince and the father of the present Kaiser.]
    • [The little boy with the sword afterwards became the Crown Prince and the father of the present Kaiser.]
    • Views in Potsdam.
      • 1. Palace of Sans-Souci. 2. Castle of Babelsberg. 3. Brandenburg Gate. 4. The Orangery. 5. The New Palace.
    • 1. Palace of Sans-Souci. 2. Castle of Babelsberg. 3. Brandenburg Gate. 4. The Orangery. 5. The New Palace.
    • The Prussian Guard, the flower of the German army, and the pride of the Kaiser.
      • Photo, Record Press.
    • Photo, Record Press.
    • CHAPTER XIII.
      • CROWN PRINCE AND KAISER.
      • "Four Generations of Kings."
        • The old Emperor William I. is seated, nursing his great-grandson, the present Crown Prince, who was born in 1882. On the left stands the Crown Prince, who became the Emperor Frederick III. on the death of William I. in 1888. On the right stands his son, the baby's father, Prince William, who became Emperor on the death of his father, after a brief reign of eighty-four days (1888). When the old Emperor learnt that a great-grandson had been born to him, he cried, "God be praised and thanked! Four generations of kings!" He could not, of course, foresee the present war, which may bring about the ruin of his house and make his prophecy false. You will learn something of the present Crown Prince later on.
      • The old Emperor William I. is seated, nursing his great-grandson, the present Crown Prince, who was born in 1882. On the left stands the Crown Prince, who became the Emperor Frederick III. on the death of William I. in 1888. On the right stands his son, the baby's father, Prince William, who became Emperor on the death of his father, after a brief reign of eighty-four days (1888). When the old Emperor learnt that a great-grandson had been born to him, he cried, "God be praised and thanked! Four generations of kings!" He could not, of course, foresee the present war, which may bring about the ruin of his house and make his prophecy false. You will learn something of the present Crown Prince later on.
      • The Emperor Frederick III.
        • (From the picture by Heinrich von Angeli.)
      • (From the picture by Heinrich von Angeli.)
      • The Kaiser Wilhelm II. opening his First Parliament.
        • (From the picture by Anton von Werner.)
      • (From the picture by Anton von Werner.)
      • King Edward VII. and the Kaiser following the coffin of Queen Victoria through the streets of Windsor.
      • Kiel Canal.
      • "Nations of Europe, defend your most sacred possessions."
        • (Painted by H. Knackfuss from a sketch by the Kaiser.)
      • (Painted by H. Knackfuss from a sketch by the Kaiser.)
      • A Zeppelin with part of the covering removed to show the interior.
    • CROWN PRINCE AND KAISER.
    • "Four Generations of Kings."
      • The old Emperor William I. is seated, nursing his great-grandson, the present Crown Prince, who was born in 1882. On the left stands the Crown Prince, who became the Emperor Frederick III. on the death of William I. in 1888. On the right stands his son, the baby's father, Prince William, who became Emperor on the death of his father, after a brief reign of eighty-four days (1888). When the old Emperor learnt that a great-grandson had been born to him, he cried, "God be praised and thanked! Four generations of kings!" He could not, of course, foresee the present war, which may bring about the ruin of his house and make his prophecy false. You will learn something of the present Crown Prince later on.
    • The old Emperor William I. is seated, nursing his great-grandson, the present Crown Prince, who was born in 1882. On the left stands the Crown Prince, who became the Emperor Frederick III. on the death of William I. in 1888. On the right stands his son, the baby's father, Prince William, who became Emperor on the death of his father, after a brief reign of eighty-four days (1888). When the old Emperor learnt that a great-grandson had been born to him, he cried, "God be praised and thanked! Four generations of kings!" He could not, of course, foresee the present war, which may bring about the ruin of his house and make his prophecy false. You will learn something of the present Crown Prince later on.
    • The Emperor Frederick III.
      • (From the picture by Heinrich von Angeli.)
    • (From the picture by Heinrich von Angeli.)
    • The Kaiser Wilhelm II. opening his First Parliament.
      • (From the picture by Anton von Werner.)
    • (From the picture by Anton von Werner.)
    • King Edward VII. and the Kaiser following the coffin of Queen Victoria through the streets of Windsor.
    • Kiel Canal.
    • "Nations of Europe, defend your most sacred possessions."
      • (Painted by H. Knackfuss from a sketch by the Kaiser.)
    • (Painted by H. Knackfuss from a sketch by the Kaiser.)
    • A Zeppelin with part of the covering removed to show the interior.
    • CHAPTER XIV.
      • THE DAWN OF "THE DAY."
      • The Kaiser as a Yachtsman.    Photo, Record Press.
      • The above diagram compares the armies and navies of the chief European Powers.
      • King Albert of Belgium.
        • Photo, Newspaper Illustrations Limited.
      • Photo, Newspaper Illustrations Limited.
    • THE DAWN OF "THE DAY."
    • The Kaiser as a Yachtsman.    Photo, Record Press.
    • The above diagram compares the armies and navies of the chief European Powers.
    • King Albert of Belgium.
      • Photo, Newspaper Illustrations Limited.
    • Photo, Newspaper Illustrations Limited.
    • CHAPTER XV.
      • FATEFUL DAYS.
      • French Infantry.    Photo, Central News.
        • [These soldiers are French regulars, who, unlike the conscripts, serve for more than three years in the army.]
      • [These soldiers are French regulars, who, unlike the conscripts, serve for more than three years in the army.]
    • FATEFUL DAYS.
    • French Infantry.    Photo, Central News.
      • [These soldiers are French regulars, who, unlike the conscripts, serve for more than three years in the army.]
    • [These soldiers are French regulars, who, unlike the conscripts, serve for more than three years in the army.]
    • CHAPTER XVI.
      • WHY BRITAIN WENT TO WAR.
      • Naval Reserves passing through Portsmouth to join their ships.    Photo, Sport and General.
      • Sir Edward Grey making his great Speech in the House of Commons on August 3, 1914.
        • "My own feeling is this, that if a foreign fleet, engaged in a war which France had not sought, and in which she had not been the aggressor, came down the English Channel and bombarded and battered the unprotected coasts of France, we could not stand aside [loud cheers] and see this going on practically within sight of our eyes, with our arms folded, looking on dispassionately doing nothing; and I believe that would be the feeling of this country [cheers]. ...If, in a crisis like this, we ran away [loud cheers] from our obligations of honour and interest with regard to the Belgian Treaty, I doubt whether whatever material force we might have at the end of it would be of very much value in face of the respect that we should have lost." By permission of the illustrated London News.
      • "My own feeling is this, that if a foreign fleet, engaged in a war which France had not sought, and in which she had not been the aggressor, came down the English Channel and bombarded and battered the unprotected coasts of France, we could not stand aside [loud cheers] and see this going on practically within sight of our eyes, with our arms folded, looking on dispassionately doing nothing; and I believe that would be the feeling of this country [cheers]. ...If, in a crisis like this, we ran away [loud cheers] from our obligations of honour and interest with regard to the Belgian Treaty, I doubt whether whatever material force we might have at the end of it would be of very much value in face of the respect that we should have lost." By permission of the illustrated London News.
      • The Scrap of Paper.
        • This is a copy of the really important part of the treaty of 1839 which guaranteed the neutrality of Belgium. It is signed by the representatives of Britain, Belgium, Austria, France, Prussia, and Russia. The French words which are written above the seals may be translated as follows: "Belgium, within the limits indicated by Articles I., II., and IV., shall form an independent and perpetually neutral State. She will be bound to observe this same neutrality towards all the other States."
      • This is a copy of the really important part of the treaty of 1839 which guaranteed the neutrality of Belgium. It is signed by the representatives of Britain, Belgium, Austria, France, Prussia, and Russia. The French words which are written above the seals may be translated as follows: "Belgium, within the limits indicated by Articles I., II., and IV., shall form an independent and perpetually neutral State. She will be bound to observe this same neutrality towards all the other States."
      • Sir John Jellicoe.
        • Our artist has here shown him as "the man at the wheel," for he is in supreme command of the Grand Fleet in home waters. He is fifty-five years of age, and has been in the Navy for forty-two years. He has the full confidence of every officer and man in the service, and Britons everywhere believe that he will uphold the fame of the great admirals who gave Britain command of the seas.
      • Our artist has here shown him as "the man at the wheel," for he is in supreme command of the Grand Fleet in home waters. He is fifty-five years of age, and has been in the Navy for forty-two years. He has the full confidence of every officer and man in the service, and Britons everywhere believe that he will uphold the fame of the great admirals who gave Britain command of the seas.
    • WHY BRITAIN WENT TO WAR.
    • Naval Reserves passing through Portsmouth to join their ships.    Photo, Sport and General.
    • Sir Edward Grey making his great Speech in the House of Commons on August 3, 1914.
      • "My own feeling is this, that if a foreign fleet, engaged in a war which France had not sought, and in which she had not been the aggressor, came down the English Channel and bombarded and battered the unprotected coasts of France, we could not stand aside [loud cheers] and see this going on practically within sight of our eyes, with our arms folded, looking on dispassionately doing nothing; and I believe that would be the feeling of this country [cheers]. ...If, in a crisis like this, we ran away [loud cheers] from our obligations of honour and interest with regard to the Belgian Treaty, I doubt whether whatever material force we might have at the end of it would be of very much value in face of the respect that we should have lost." By permission of the illustrated London News.
    • "My own feeling is this, that if a foreign fleet, engaged in a war which France had not sought, and in which she had not been the aggressor, came down the English Channel and bombarded and battered the unprotected coasts of France, we could not stand aside [loud cheers] and see this going on practically within sight of our eyes, with our arms folded, looking on dispassionately doing nothing; and I believe that would be the feeling of this country [cheers]. ...If, in a crisis like this, we ran away [loud cheers] from our obligations of honour and interest with regard to the Belgian Treaty, I doubt whether whatever material force we might have at the end of it would be of very much value in face of the respect that we should have lost." By permission of the illustrated London News.
    • The Scrap of Paper.
      • This is a copy of the really important part of the treaty of 1839 which guaranteed the neutrality of Belgium. It is signed by the representatives of Britain, Belgium, Austria, France, Prussia, and Russia. The French words which are written above the seals may be translated as follows: "Belgium, within the limits indicated by Articles I., II., and IV., shall form an independent and perpetually neutral State. She will be bound to observe this same neutrality towards all the other States."
    • This is a copy of the really important part of the treaty of 1839 which guaranteed the neutrality of Belgium. It is signed by the representatives of Britain, Belgium, Austria, France, Prussia, and Russia. The French words which are written above the seals may be translated as follows: "Belgium, within the limits indicated by Articles I., II., and IV., shall form an independent and perpetually neutral State. She will be bound to observe this same neutrality towards all the other States."
    • Sir John Jellicoe.
      • Our artist has here shown him as "the man at the wheel," for he is in supreme command of the Grand Fleet in home waters. He is fifty-five years of age, and has been in the Navy for forty-two years. He has the full confidence of every officer and man in the service, and Britons everywhere believe that he will uphold the fame of the great admirals who gave Britain command of the seas.
    • Our artist has here shown him as "the man at the wheel," for he is in supreme command of the Grand Fleet in home waters. He is fifty-five years of age, and has been in the Navy for forty-two years. He has the full confidence of every officer and man in the service, and Britons everywhere believe that he will uphold the fame of the great admirals who gave Britain command of the seas.
    • CHAPTER XVII.
      • THE SUBMARINE THAT FAILED.
      • Floating Mine.
      • Sweeping up mines in the North Sea.
      • Section of a Submarine.
        • This picture gives an excellent view of a torpedo and its tube on board a destroyer. The tube, you will observe, can be trained like a gun, and thus a correct aim can be taken.
        • This diagram gives a section of a torpedo, which has been well described as a complete little warship. It has engines to drive it along; rudders to steer it; a special apparatus to make it return to the line of fire, if it should swerve; a supply of explosives to damage the enemy, and apparatus for firing the explosive at the right moment. A torpedo such as is used in our navy costs £1,000. Warships at anchor have steel nets around them as a protection against torpedoes. Some torpedoes, however, are fitted with a pair of powerful wire cutters, which enable them to pierce the net and strike the ship.
      • This picture gives an excellent view of a torpedo and its tube on board a destroyer. The tube, you will observe, can be trained like a gun, and thus a correct aim can be taken.
      • This diagram gives a section of a torpedo, which has been well described as a complete little warship. It has engines to drive it along; rudders to steer it; a special apparatus to make it return to the line of fire, if it should swerve; a supply of explosives to damage the enemy, and apparatus for firing the explosive at the right moment. A torpedo such as is used in our navy costs £1,000. Warships at anchor have steel nets around them as a protection against torpedoes. Some torpedoes, however, are fitted with a pair of powerful wire cutters, which enable them to pierce the net and strike the ship.
      • A cruiser ramming a submarine.
    • THE SUBMARINE THAT FAILED.
    • Floating Mine.
    • Sweeping up mines in the North Sea.
    • Section of a Submarine.
      • This picture gives an excellent view of a torpedo and its tube on board a destroyer. The tube, you will observe, can be trained like a gun, and thus a correct aim can be taken.
      • This diagram gives a section of a torpedo, which has been well described as a complete little warship. It has engines to drive it along; rudders to steer it; a special apparatus to make it return to the line of fire, if it should swerve; a supply of explosives to damage the enemy, and apparatus for firing the explosive at the right moment. A torpedo such as is used in our navy costs £1,000. Warships at anchor have steel nets around them as a protection against torpedoes. Some torpedoes, however, are fitted with a pair of powerful wire cutters, which enable them to pierce the net and strike the ship.
    • This picture gives an excellent view of a torpedo and its tube on board a destroyer. The tube, you will observe, can be trained like a gun, and thus a correct aim can be taken.
    • This diagram gives a section of a torpedo, which has been well described as a complete little warship. It has engines to drive it along; rudders to steer it; a special apparatus to make it return to the line of fire, if it should swerve; a supply of explosives to damage the enemy, and apparatus for firing the explosive at the right moment. A torpedo such as is used in our navy costs £1,000. Warships at anchor have steel nets around them as a protection against torpedoes. Some torpedoes, however, are fitted with a pair of powerful wire cutters, which enable them to pierce the net and strike the ship.
    • A cruiser ramming a submarine.
    • CHAPTER XVIII.
      • INFANTRY AND ITS WORK.
      • Territorial Infantry marching along Fleet Street, London. Most of these men in private life are lawyers.
        • Photo, Record Press.
      • Photo, Record Press.
      • A concealed machine gun in action.    Photo, Newspaper Illustrations Ltd.
      • A trench made by infantry.
        • In the drawing the trench has been cut through vertically to show how it is made. "a" is the parapet piled up behind the hedge to protect the firer, who is shooting through a loophole ("d") made of bags of earth. "b" is the bank of earth thrown up behind the trench to protect the men from the "back blast" of shells, for when they burst, their effect is felt as severely behind them as in front. "c" is the bank of earth at the end of the trench to protect the men from enfilade fire—that is, from fire along the length of the trench. Frequently trenches are made in zigzags to avoid this danger.
      • In the drawing the trench has been cut through vertically to show how it is made. "a" is the parapet piled up behind the hedge to protect the firer, who is shooting through a loophole ("d") made of bags of earth. "b" is the bank of earth thrown up behind the trench to protect the men from the "back blast" of shells, for when they burst, their effect is felt as severely behind them as in front. "c" is the bank of earth at the end of the trench to protect the men from enfilade fire—that is, from fire along the length of the trench. Frequently trenches are made in zigzags to avoid this danger.
      • The Lee-Enfield Rifle.
        • A spring (A) at the bottom of the magazine pushes the cartridges up towards the top. By pushing forward the bolt (B) in the direction of the arrow, you shove the top cartridge (C) into the chamber (D). After you have fired, you pull back the bolt, and this pulls out the empty cartridge case. A small metal leaf can be pushed across the top of the magazine at E, so that you can load and fire the rifle without using the cartridges in the magazine. This leaf is called the "cut-off."
      • A spring (A) at the bottom of the magazine pushes the cartridges up towards the top. By pushing forward the bolt (B) in the direction of the arrow, you shove the top cartridge (C) into the chamber (D). After you have fired, you pull back the bolt, and this pulls out the empty cartridge case. A small metal leaf can be pushed across the top of the magazine at E, so that you can load and fire the rifle without using the cartridges in the magazine. This leaf is called the "cut-off."
    • INFANTRY AND ITS WORK.
    • Territorial Infantry marching along Fleet Street, London. Most of these men in private life are lawyers.
      • Photo, Record Press.
    • Photo, Record Press.
    • A concealed machine gun in action.    Photo, Newspaper Illustrations Ltd.
    • A trench made by infantry.
      • In the drawing the trench has been cut through vertically to show how it is made. "a" is the parapet piled up behind the hedge to protect the firer, who is shooting through a loophole ("d") made of bags of earth. "b" is the bank of earth thrown up behind the trench to protect the men from the "back blast" of shells, for when they burst, their effect is felt as severely behind them as in front. "c" is the bank of earth at the end of the trench to protect the men from enfilade fire—that is, from fire along the length of the trench. Frequently trenches are made in zigzags to avoid this danger.
    • In the drawing the trench has been cut through vertically to show how it is made. "a" is the parapet piled up behind the hedge to protect the firer, who is shooting through a loophole ("d") made of bags of earth. "b" is the bank of earth thrown up behind the trench to protect the men from the "back blast" of shells, for when they burst, their effect is felt as severely behind them as in front. "c" is the bank of earth at the end of the trench to protect the men from enfilade fire—that is, from fire along the length of the trench. Frequently trenches are made in zigzags to avoid this danger.
    • The Lee-Enfield Rifle.
      • A spring (A) at the bottom of the magazine pushes the cartridges up towards the top. By pushing forward the bolt (B) in the direction of the arrow, you shove the top cartridge (C) into the chamber (D). After you have fired, you pull back the bolt, and this pulls out the empty cartridge case. A small metal leaf can be pushed across the top of the magazine at E, so that you can load and fire the rifle without using the cartridges in the magazine. This leaf is called the "cut-off."
    • A spring (A) at the bottom of the magazine pushes the cartridges up towards the top. By pushing forward the bolt (B) in the direction of the arrow, you shove the top cartridge (C) into the chamber (D). After you have fired, you pull back the bolt, and this pulls out the empty cartridge case. A small metal leaf can be pushed across the top of the magazine at E, so that you can load and fire the rifle without using the cartridges in the magazine. This leaf is called the "cut-off."
    • CHAPTER XIX.
      • CAVALRY AND ARTILLERY.
      • Troopers and their Equipment.
        • The trooper's uniform is the same as that of the infantryman. Until a few years ago he was armed with a carbine (3), which he carried in a leather bucket (4), attached to the right side of the saddle by straps. He is now armed with the infantry rifle. This is not shown in the pictures, but is carried as the carbine was, with its butt in a leather case hanging by straps from the saddle near the man's left heel. Its barrel passes through a loop around his right arm, as the lance is carried. (See picture on the right.) 1 is the loop attaching lance to the arm; 2, the sabre; 3, the carbine; 4, the bucket; 5, the bandolier, carrying cartridges; 6, a pair of boots; 7, a cloak; 8, a saddlebag, holding knife, fork, spoon, brush, comb, towel, emergency ration, etc.; 9, a saddlebag, holding shirt, drawers, socks, currycomb, stable-brush, etc.; 10, breeches and puttees rolled in waterproof sheet; 11, hay net; 12, nosebag, holding corn; 13, picketing ropes; 14, haversack with man's food; 15, water-bottle; 16, two horse-shoes in leather case; 17, numnah (felt to save horse's back) and horse-blanket under the saddle; 18, halter; 19, halter-rope twisted up.
      • The trooper's uniform is the same as that of the infantryman. Until a few years ago he was armed with a carbine (3), which he carried in a leather bucket (4), attached to the right side of the saddle by straps. He is now armed with the infantry rifle. This is not shown in the pictures, but is carried as the carbine was, with its butt in a leather case hanging by straps from the saddle near the man's left heel. Its barrel passes through a loop around his right arm, as the lance is carried. (See picture on the right.) 1 is the loop attaching lance to the arm; 2, the sabre; 3, the carbine; 4, the bucket; 5, the bandolier, carrying cartridges; 6, a pair of boots; 7, a cloak; 8, a saddlebag, holding knife, fork, spoon, brush, comb, towel, emergency ration, etc.; 9, a saddlebag, holding shirt, drawers, socks, currycomb, stable-brush, etc.; 10, breeches and puttees rolled in waterproof sheet; 11, hay net; 12, nosebag, holding corn; 13, picketing ropes; 14, haversack with man's food; 15, water-bottle; 16, two horse-shoes in leather case; 17, numnah (felt to save horse's back) and horse-blanket under the saddle; 18, halter; 19, halter-rope twisted up.
      • Cavalry held up by Infantry.
        • This illustration shows a body of German horsemen attempting to attack infantry who have taken cover in a shallow trench. The Germans have had to charge across an open field, and the infantry, by rapid rifle fire, have shot down many of the men and their horses. Only a handful have been able to come within fifty yards of the trench, and these, as you see, have been thrown into confusion. Two of them are holding up the hand in token of surrender. From this drawing you will easily understand that "if infantry keep cool and collected, have plenty of ammunition, and can see the mounted men for some minutes before they arrive at close quarters, they can shoot down horses and troopers, and probably save themselves from being ridden over."
      • This illustration shows a body of German horsemen attempting to attack infantry who have taken cover in a shallow trench. The Germans have had to charge across an open field, and the infantry, by rapid rifle fire, have shot down many of the men and their horses. Only a handful have been able to come within fifty yards of the trench, and these, as you see, have been thrown into confusion. Two of them are holding up the hand in token of surrender. From this drawing you will easily understand that "if infantry keep cool and collected, have plenty of ammunition, and can see the mounted men for some minutes before they arrive at close quarters, they can shoot down horses and troopers, and probably save themselves from being ridden over."
      • Shrapnel Shell. (Section.)
      • Royal Field Artillery in Action.    Photo, Exclusive News Agency.
        • Notice that the gun is hidden behind bushes. Sometimes the guns are covered with straw or branches of trees in order to hide them from observers in aeroplanes.
      • Notice that the gun is hidden behind bushes. Sometimes the guns are covered with straw or branches of trees in order to hide them from observers in aeroplanes.
      • Heavy German Howitzer for siege work.
        • (Photo, Newspaper Illustrations.)
        • The left-hand picture shows the advantage possessed by a howitzer over a field gun when firing over a hill at some troops at t. i is the howitzer, and a, a, a is the track of its shell. 2 is the field gun, and b, b would be the path of its shell were it not stopped at B by the hill. The right-hand picture compares the effects on a trench of a shell from a howitzer and a shell from a field-gun. 3 is the howitzer's shrapnel shell bursting and pouring its bullets into the trench; but you will notice that the parapet of earth protects the occupants of the trench from the bullets of the field-gun's shrapnel shell, which is bursting at 4. Both of these shells are fitted with "time fuses," which make them explode in the air as shown. If they were fitted with "percussion fuses," the howitzer shell would fall to the bottom of the trench, and explode at h; while the field-gun shell would not burst until it hit the ground at s. In both pictures the howitzer is firing at a range of 2¾ miles—that is, it is 2¾ miles from the target—and the field gun at a range of 2¼ miles.
      • (Photo, Newspaper Illustrations.)
      • The left-hand picture shows the advantage possessed by a howitzer over a field gun when firing over a hill at some troops at t. i is the howitzer, and a, a, a is the track of its shell. 2 is the field gun, and b, b would be the path of its shell were it not stopped at B by the hill. The right-hand picture compares the effects on a trench of a shell from a howitzer and a shell from a field-gun. 3 is the howitzer's shrapnel shell bursting and pouring its bullets into the trench; but you will notice that the parapet of earth protects the occupants of the trench from the bullets of the field-gun's shrapnel shell, which is bursting at 4. Both of these shells are fitted with "time fuses," which make them explode in the air as shown. If they were fitted with "percussion fuses," the howitzer shell would fall to the bottom of the trench, and explode at h; while the field-gun shell would not burst until it hit the ground at s. In both pictures the howitzer is firing at a range of 2¾ miles—that is, it is 2¾ miles from the target—and the field gun at a range of 2¼ miles.
      • Armoured Train.
        • (Photo, Central News.)
      • (Photo, Central News.)
      • Columns marching along one road and deploying.
      • Columns marching along three parallel roads and deploying.
      • Engineers at work erecting a pontoon bridge over a river.    Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd.
      • Signalling by means of two flags. Most signalling is now done by means of one flag.
      • A comparison between a man and an army.
    • CAVALRY AND ARTILLERY.
    • Troopers and their Equipment.
      • The trooper's uniform is the same as that of the infantryman. Until a few years ago he was armed with a carbine (3), which he carried in a leather bucket (4), attached to the right side of the saddle by straps. He is now armed with the infantry rifle. This is not shown in the pictures, but is carried as the carbine was, with its butt in a leather case hanging by straps from the saddle near the man's left heel. Its barrel passes through a loop around his right arm, as the lance is carried. (See picture on the right.) 1 is the loop attaching lance to the arm; 2, the sabre; 3, the carbine; 4, the bucket; 5, the bandolier, carrying cartridges; 6, a pair of boots; 7, a cloak; 8, a saddlebag, holding knife, fork, spoon, brush, comb, towel, emergency ration, etc.; 9, a saddlebag, holding shirt, drawers, socks, currycomb, stable-brush, etc.; 10, breeches and puttees rolled in waterproof sheet; 11, hay net; 12, nosebag, holding corn; 13, picketing ropes; 14, haversack with man's food; 15, water-bottle; 16, two horse-shoes in leather case; 17, numnah (felt to save horse's back) and horse-blanket under the saddle; 18, halter; 19, halter-rope twisted up.
    • The trooper's uniform is the same as that of the infantryman. Until a few years ago he was armed with a carbine (3), which he carried in a leather bucket (4), attached to the right side of the saddle by straps. He is now armed with the infantry rifle. This is not shown in the pictures, but is carried as the carbine was, with its butt in a leather case hanging by straps from the saddle near the man's left heel. Its barrel passes through a loop around his right arm, as the lance is carried. (See picture on the right.) 1 is the loop attaching lance to the arm; 2, the sabre; 3, the carbine; 4, the bucket; 5, the bandolier, carrying cartridges; 6, a pair of boots; 7, a cloak; 8, a saddlebag, holding knife, fork, spoon, brush, comb, towel, emergency ration, etc.; 9, a saddlebag, holding shirt, drawers, socks, currycomb, stable-brush, etc.; 10, breeches and puttees rolled in waterproof sheet; 11, hay net; 12, nosebag, holding corn; 13, picketing ropes; 14, haversack with man's food; 15, water-bottle; 16, two horse-shoes in leather case; 17, numnah (felt to save horse's back) and horse-blanket under the saddle; 18, halter; 19, halter-rope twisted up.
    • Cavalry held up by Infantry.
      • This illustration shows a body of German horsemen attempting to attack infantry who have taken cover in a shallow trench. The Germans have had to charge across an open field, and the infantry, by rapid rifle fire, have shot down many of the men and their horses. Only a handful have been able to come within fifty yards of the trench, and these, as you see, have been thrown into confusion. Two of them are holding up the hand in token of surrender. From this drawing you will easily understand that "if infantry keep cool and collected, have plenty of ammunition, and can see the mounted men for some minutes before they arrive at close quarters, they can shoot down horses and troopers, and probably save themselves from being ridden over."
    • This illustration shows a body of German horsemen attempting to attack infantry who have taken cover in a shallow trench. The Germans have had to charge across an open field, and the infantry, by rapid rifle fire, have shot down many of the men and their horses. Only a handful have been able to come within fifty yards of the trench, and these, as you see, have been thrown into confusion. Two of them are holding up the hand in token of surrender. From this drawing you will easily understand that "if infantry keep cool and collected, have plenty of ammunition, and can see the mounted men for some minutes before they arrive at close quarters, they can shoot down horses and troopers, and probably save themselves from being ridden over."
    • Shrapnel Shell. (Section.)
    • Royal Field Artillery in Action.    Photo, Exclusive News Agency.
      • Notice that the gun is hidden behind bushes. Sometimes the guns are covered with straw or branches of trees in order to hide them from observers in aeroplanes.
    • Notice that the gun is hidden behind bushes. Sometimes the guns are covered with straw or branches of trees in order to hide them from observers in aeroplanes.
    • Heavy German Howitzer for siege work.
      • (Photo, Newspaper Illustrations.)
      • The left-hand picture shows the advantage possessed by a howitzer over a field gun when firing over a hill at some troops at t. i is the howitzer, and a, a, a is the track of its shell. 2 is the field gun, and b, b would be the path of its shell were it not stopped at B by the hill. The right-hand picture compares the effects on a trench of a shell from a howitzer and a shell from a field-gun. 3 is the howitzer's shrapnel shell bursting and pouring its bullets into the trench; but you will notice that the parapet of earth protects the occupants of the trench from the bullets of the field-gun's shrapnel shell, which is bursting at 4. Both of these shells are fitted with "time fuses," which make them explode in the air as shown. If they were fitted with "percussion fuses," the howitzer shell would fall to the bottom of the trench, and explode at h; while the field-gun shell would not burst until it hit the ground at s. In both pictures the howitzer is firing at a range of 2¾ miles—that is, it is 2¾ miles from the target—and the field gun at a range of 2¼ miles.
    • (Photo, Newspaper Illustrations.)
    • The left-hand picture shows the advantage possessed by a howitzer over a field gun when firing over a hill at some troops at t. i is the howitzer, and a, a, a is the track of its shell. 2 is the field gun, and b, b would be the path of its shell were it not stopped at B by the hill. The right-hand picture compares the effects on a trench of a shell from a howitzer and a shell from a field-gun. 3 is the howitzer's shrapnel shell bursting and pouring its bullets into the trench; but you will notice that the parapet of earth protects the occupants of the trench from the bullets of the field-gun's shrapnel shell, which is bursting at 4. Both of these shells are fitted with "time fuses," which make them explode in the air as shown. If they were fitted with "percussion fuses," the howitzer shell would fall to the bottom of the trench, and explode at h; while the field-gun shell would not burst until it hit the ground at s. In both pictures the howitzer is firing at a range of 2¾ miles—that is, it is 2¾ miles from the target—and the field gun at a range of 2¼ miles.
    • Armoured Train.
      • (Photo, Central News.)
    • (Photo, Central News.)
    • Columns marching along one road and deploying.
    • Columns marching along three parallel roads and deploying.
    • Engineers at work erecting a pontoon bridge over a river.    Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd.
    • Signalling by means of two flags. Most signalling is now done by means of one flag.
    • A comparison between a man and an army.
    • CHAPTER XX.
      • SOME MILITARY TERMS.
        • This picture represents the headquarters of a French division in a village. Notice the cavalry and cyclist scouts and the men receiving messages by telephone. Notice also the officers writing orders and poring over maps.
      • This picture represents the headquarters of a French division in a village. Notice the cavalry and cyclist scouts and the men receiving messages by telephone. Notice also the officers writing orders and poring over maps.
      • In Trenches.    Photopress.
        • These trenches have been occupied for a considerable time, and much has been done to make them habitable. Notice the parapet behind which the men stand to fire, and the dug-out in which they take refuge when the trench is heavily shelled.
        • Fig. 1.
        • Fig. 2.
      • These trenches have been occupied for a considerable time, and much has been done to make them habitable. Notice the parapet behind which the men stand to fire, and the dug-out in which they take refuge when the trench is heavily shelled.
      • Fig. 1.
      • Fig. 2.
    • SOME MILITARY TERMS.
      • This picture represents the headquarters of a French division in a village. Notice the cavalry and cyclist scouts and the men receiving messages by telephone. Notice also the officers writing orders and poring over maps.
    • This picture represents the headquarters of a French division in a village. Notice the cavalry and cyclist scouts and the men receiving messages by telephone. Notice also the officers writing orders and poring over maps.
    • In Trenches.    Photopress.
      • These trenches have been occupied for a considerable time, and much has been done to make them habitable. Notice the parapet behind which the men stand to fire, and the dug-out in which they take refuge when the trench is heavily shelled.
      • Fig. 1.
      • Fig. 2.
    • These trenches have been occupied for a considerable time, and much has been done to make them habitable. Notice the parapet behind which the men stand to fire, and the dug-out in which they take refuge when the trench is heavily shelled.
    • Fig. 1.
    • Fig. 2.
    • CHAPTER XXI.
      • THE INVASION OF BELGIUM.
      • King George walking with King Albert in the main street of a Belgian town.
        • (Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd.)
      • (Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd.)
    • THE INVASION OF BELGIUM.
    • King George walking with King Albert in the main street of a Belgian town.
      • (Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd.)
    • (Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd.)
    • CHAPTER XXII.
      • HOW LIÉGE WON THE LEGION OF HONOUR.
      • Map illustrating the War in Belgium (Aug. 9-20).
      • Diagram of a Liége Fort.
      • General von Emmich, commanding the German Army in Belgium.
      • Bringing Provisions to Forts.
        • Photo, Central News.
      • Photo, Central News.
      • Liége and its Forts.
        • Note that the forts are not shown in their proper positions, but only indicate their direction with reference to the city. (By permission of the Illustrated London News.)
      • Note that the forts are not shown in their proper positions, but only indicate their direction with reference to the city. (By permission of the Illustrated London News.)
      • Fort Loncin after Bombardment.    Photo, Alfieri Picture Service.
      • General Leman, the heroic defender of Liége.
        • Photo, Alfieri Picture Service.
      • Photo, Alfieri Picture Service.
      • Belgian Cavalry.
        • (Photo, Underwood and Underwood.)
      • (Photo, Underwood and Underwood.)
    • HOW LIÉGE WON THE LEGION OF HONOUR.
    • Map illustrating the War in Belgium (Aug. 9-20).
    • Diagram of a Liége Fort.
    • General von Emmich, commanding the German Army in Belgium.
    • Bringing Provisions to Forts.
      • Photo, Central News.
    • Photo, Central News.
    • Liége and its Forts.
      • Note that the forts are not shown in their proper positions, but only indicate their direction with reference to the city. (By permission of the Illustrated London News.)
    • Note that the forts are not shown in their proper positions, but only indicate their direction with reference to the city. (By permission of the Illustrated London News.)
    • Fort Loncin after Bombardment.    Photo, Alfieri Picture Service.
    • General Leman, the heroic defender of Liége.
      • Photo, Alfieri Picture Service.
    • Photo, Alfieri Picture Service.
    • Belgian Cavalry.
      • (Photo, Underwood and Underwood.)
    • (Photo, Underwood and Underwood.)
    • CHAPTER XXIII.
      • THE RAID INTO ALSACE.
      • The Brave Boy Scout.
        • "He walked with firm steps to a telegraph post, stood against it, and with the green vineyard behind him, smiled as they shot him dead."
      • "He walked with firm steps to a telegraph post, stood against it, and with the green vineyard behind him, smiled as they shot him dead."
      • The Fight at Mulhouse on August 9, 1914, during the French Raid into Alsace.
      • Uhlans on the March.
        • Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd.
      • Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd.
    • THE RAID INTO ALSACE.
    • The Brave Boy Scout.
      • "He walked with firm steps to a telegraph post, stood against it, and with the green vineyard behind him, smiled as they shot him dead."
    • "He walked with firm steps to a telegraph post, stood against it, and with the green vineyard behind him, smiled as they shot him dead."
    • The Fight at Mulhouse on August 9, 1914, during the French Raid into Alsace.
    • Uhlans on the March.
      • Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd.
    • Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd.
    • CHAPTER XXIV.
      • THE GERMANS IN BELGIUM.
      • The Huns marching through a Belgian village.
        • Photo, Record Press.
      • Photo, Record Press.
      • Belgians defending a Barricade.    Photo, Sport and General.
    • THE GERMANS IN BELGIUM.
    • The Huns marching through a Belgian village.
      • Photo, Record Press.
    • Photo, Record Press.
    • Belgians defending a Barricade.    Photo, Sport and General.
    • CHAPTER XXV.
      • DEEDS OF SHAME AND HORROR.
      • Germans in the Church at Aerschot.
        • (From the painting by E. Matania. By permission of The Sphere.)
      • (From the painting by E. Matania. By permission of The Sphere.)
      • The Town Hall of Louvain.
        • Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd.
      • Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd.
      • The Destruction of Louvain.
        • Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd.
      • Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd.
      • Malines Cathedral before the Bombardment.
      • Termonde.    Photo, Central News.
    • DEEDS OF SHAME AND HORROR.
    • Germans in the Church at Aerschot.
      • (From the painting by E. Matania. By permission of The Sphere.)
    • (From the painting by E. Matania. By permission of The Sphere.)
    • The Town Hall of Louvain.
      • Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd.
    • Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd.
    • The Destruction of Louvain.
      • Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd.
    • Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd.
    • Malines Cathedral before the Bombardment.
    • Termonde.    Photo, Central News.
    • CHAPTER XXVI.
      • THE RALLY OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE.
      • Men of the New Army drilling in Hyde Park, London.    Photo, Central News.
      • Views in Quebec.
        • 1. Dufferin Terrace. 2. The Citadel and Château Frontenac. 3. Plains of Abraham, and Wolfe Monument. 4. Sous-le-Cap Street. 5. Montmorency Falls. 6. Church of Notre-Dame des Victoires. 7. Parliament Buildings. 8. French Cathedral.
      • 1. Dufferin Terrace. 2. The Citadel and Château Frontenac. 3. Plains of Abraham, and Wolfe Monument. 4. Sous-le-Cap Street. 5. Montmorency Falls. 6. Church of Notre-Dame des Victoires. 7. Parliament Buildings. 8. French Cathedral.
      • Transports arriving at Plymouth.    Photo, Central News.
      • Canadian Troops on Salisbury Plain.
        • Photos, Alfieri and Central News. The King reviews Canadian troops on Salisbury Plain (top). Three cheers for his Majesty the King! (middle). The armoured motor cars of the Canadians (bottom).
      • Photos, Alfieri and Central News. The King reviews Canadian troops on Salisbury Plain (top). Three cheers for his Majesty the King! (middle). The armoured motor cars of the Canadians (bottom).
      • Australians for the Front.    Photo, Central News.
      • Australians near the Pyramids.    Photo, Record Press.
        • This picture shows Sir George Reid, High Commissioner of Australia, visiting the camp of the Australian contingent in Egypt. In the course of a speech he said, "The Pyramids have been silent witnesses of many strange events, but never before have looked upon such a splendid array of troops."
      • This picture shows Sir George Reid, High Commissioner of Australia, visiting the camp of the Australian contingent in Egypt. In the course of a speech he said, "The Pyramids have been silent witnesses of many strange events, but never before have looked upon such a splendid array of troops."
    • THE RALLY OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE.
    • Men of the New Army drilling in Hyde Park, London.    Photo, Central News.
    • Views in Quebec.
      • 1. Dufferin Terrace. 2. The Citadel and Château Frontenac. 3. Plains of Abraham, and Wolfe Monument. 4. Sous-le-Cap Street. 5. Montmorency Falls. 6. Church of Notre-Dame des Victoires. 7. Parliament Buildings. 8. French Cathedral.
    • 1. Dufferin Terrace. 2. The Citadel and Château Frontenac. 3. Plains of Abraham, and Wolfe Monument. 4. Sous-le-Cap Street. 5. Montmorency Falls. 6. Church of Notre-Dame des Victoires. 7. Parliament Buildings. 8. French Cathedral.
    • Transports arriving at Plymouth.    Photo, Central News.
    • Canadian Troops on Salisbury Plain.
      • Photos, Alfieri and Central News. The King reviews Canadian troops on Salisbury Plain (top). Three cheers for his Majesty the King! (middle). The armoured motor cars of the Canadians (bottom).
    • Photos, Alfieri and Central News. The King reviews Canadian troops on Salisbury Plain (top). Three cheers for his Majesty the King! (middle). The armoured motor cars of the Canadians (bottom).
    • Australians for the Front.    Photo, Central News.
    • Australians near the Pyramids.    Photo, Record Press.
      • This picture shows Sir George Reid, High Commissioner of Australia, visiting the camp of the Australian contingent in Egypt. In the course of a speech he said, "The Pyramids have been silent witnesses of many strange events, but never before have looked upon such a splendid array of troops."
    • This picture shows Sir George Reid, High Commissioner of Australia, visiting the camp of the Australian contingent in Egypt. In the course of a speech he said, "The Pyramids have been silent witnesses of many strange events, but never before have looked upon such a splendid array of troops."
    • CHAPTER XXVII.
      • HOW INDIA ANSWERED THE CALL.
      • Types of our Indian Soldiers: Sikhs are seen above, and Cavalry below.    Photo, Central News.
      • Gurkha Soldiers and Officer.
        • Photo, Underwood and Underwood.
      • Photo, Underwood and Underwood.
    • HOW INDIA ANSWERED THE CALL.
    • Types of our Indian Soldiers: Sikhs are seen above, and Cavalry below.    Photo, Central News.
    • Gurkha Soldiers and Officer.
      • Photo, Underwood and Underwood.
    • Photo, Underwood and Underwood.
    • CHAPTER XXVIII.
      • THE GERMAN ADVANCE ON BRUSSELS.
      • Indian Troops camping in a London Park.    Photo, Topical Press.
      • Map showing how the German Armies were stationed on the Western Frontier.
      • Belgian Civic Guards
      • M. Adolphe Max, Burgomaster of Brussels.
      • German Soldiers parading the Streets of Brussels.    Photo, Sport and General.
    • THE GERMAN ADVANCE ON BRUSSELS.
    • Indian Troops camping in a London Park.    Photo, Topical Press.
    • Map showing how the German Armies were stationed on the Western Frontier.
    • Belgian Civic Guards
    • M. Adolphe Max, Burgomaster of Brussels.
    • German Soldiers parading the Streets of Brussels.    Photo, Sport and General.
    • CHAPTER XXIX.
      • HOW THE GERMANS ENTERED BRUSSELS.
      • Germans in Grand'-Place, Brussels.    Photo, Central News.
    • HOW THE GERMANS ENTERED BRUSSELS.
    • Germans in Grand'-Place, Brussels.    Photo, Central News.
    • CHAPTER XXX.
      • HOW THE BRITISH ARMY WAS CARRIED OVERSEAS.
      • A daring feat in mid-air.
        • (From the picture by Cyrus Cuneo.)
      • (From the picture by Cyrus Cuneo.)
      • British soldiers making friends with the people of Boulogne.
      • Sir John French.
      • End of Volume I.
        • FOOTNOTES:
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • HOW THE BRITISH ARMY WAS CARRIED OVERSEAS.
    • A daring feat in mid-air.
      • (From the picture by Cyrus Cuneo.)
    • (From the picture by Cyrus Cuneo.)
    • British soldiers making friends with the people of Boulogne.
    • Sir John French.
    • End of Volume I.
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • FOOTNOTES:
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