The Children's Story of the War Volume 4 (of 10) The Story of the Year 1915
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The Children's Story of the War Volume 4 (of 10) The Story of the Year 1915

By Edward Parrott
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Table of Contents
  • THE
  • CHILDREN'S STORY OF THE WAR
    • BY
    • SIR EDWARD PARROTT, M.A., LL.D.
    • VOLUME IV.
      • TORONTO
    • TORONTO
    • THOMAS NELSON AND SONS, Ltd.
      • LONDON, EDINBURGH, AND NEW YORK 1916
    • LONDON, EDINBURGH, AND NEW YORK 1916
    • The Sinking of the Bluecher—January 24, 1915.
  • CONTENTS.
  • CHAPTER I.
    • SETTING THE HOUSE IN ORDER.
    • The Modern Pied Piper.
      • (From the picture by A. C. Michael. By permission of The Illustrated London News.) You remember Browning's poem about the Pied Piper who drew the children after him by the magic of his music. This picture shows the pipers of a Highland regiment drawing men after them to the recruiting offices. "I rejoice in my Empire's effort," said the King, "and I feel pride in the voluntary response of my subjects all over the world. . . . The end is not in sight. More men and yet more are wanted to keep my armies in the field, and through them to secure Victory and enduring Peace."
    • (From the picture by A. C. Michael. By permission of The Illustrated London News.) You remember Browning's poem about the Pied Piper who drew the children after him by the magic of his music. This picture shows the pipers of a Highland regiment drawing men after them to the recruiting offices. "I rejoice in my Empire's effort," said the King, "and I feel pride in the voluntary response of my subjects all over the world. . . . The end is not in sight. More men and yet more are wanted to keep my armies in the field, and through them to secure Victory and enduring Peace."
    • The Minister of Munitions introducing the Munitions Bill in the House of Commons, June 23, 1915.    From the drawing by S. Begg.
      • "Three millions of young men have offered their services for their country; it depends upon us at home to support them with skill, strength, and every resource of machinery and organization at our disposal, so as to drive the conviction into the heart of nations for all time to come that those governments who deceive their neighbours to their ruin do so at their peril."
      • Women's Volunteer Reserve on a Route March in London.    Photo, Alfieri.
    • "Three millions of young men have offered their services for their country; it depends upon us at home to support them with skill, strength, and every resource of machinery and organization at our disposal, so as to drive the conviction into the heart of nations for all time to come that those governments who deceive their neighbours to their ruin do so at their peril."
    • Women's Volunteer Reserve on a Route March in London.    Photo, Alfieri.
    • Queen Elizabeth of Belgium visiting a Hospital.
      • (Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd.) Queen Elizabeth is patron of the Belgian Field Hospital, to which the readers and friends of The Children's Story of the War have presented a motor ambulance.
    • (Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd.) Queen Elizabeth is patron of the Belgian Field Hospital, to which the readers and friends of The Children's Story of the War have presented a motor ambulance.
    • The "Prince George" Motor Ambulance.
      • Our readers will be gratified to see this photograph of the ambulance which they and their friends have presented to the Belgian Field Hospital. It is a 15.9 Whitlock Motor Ambulance Express, specially constructed for field service, and can be adapted either to carry four stretcher cases, or two stretcher cases and four sitting cases, or may be used as an omnibus for eight persons. Its cost complete with four stretchers is £418.
      • The "Prince George" Motor Ambulance. Interior arranged for four Stretcher Cases.
    • Our readers will be gratified to see this photograph of the ambulance which they and their friends have presented to the Belgian Field Hospital. It is a 15.9 Whitlock Motor Ambulance Express, specially constructed for field service, and can be adapted either to carry four stretcher cases, or two stretcher cases and four sitting cases, or may be used as an omnibus for eight persons. Its cost complete with four stretchers is £418.
    • The "Prince George" Motor Ambulance. Interior arranged for four Stretcher Cases.
  • CHAPTER II.
    • THE LOSS OF THE "FORMIDABLE."
    • Captain Loxley giving his Last Order as the "Formidable" went down.
      • (From the picture by C. M. Padday. By permission of The Illustrated London News.)
    • (From the picture by C. M. Padday. By permission of The Illustrated London News.)
  • CHAPTER III.
    • THE BATTLE OF THE DOGGER BANK.
      • The Sinking of the German Dreadnought "Bluecher," during the Battle of the Dogger Bank, fought on January 24, 1915.
      • Battle of January 24, 1915—9.30 a.m.
    • The Sinking of the German Dreadnought "Bluecher," during the Battle of the Dogger Bank, fought on January 24, 1915.
    • Battle of January 24, 1915—9.30 a.m.
    • The Suez Canal at El Kantara.
      • (Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd.)
    • (Photo, Newspaper Illustrations, Ltd.)
  • CHAPTER IV.
    • THE TURKISH DESCENT UPON EGYPT.
      • Bedouin Arabs—Advance Guards of the Turkish Army which invaded Egypt in January 1915.    Photo, Central News.
      • The Suez Canal and the Sinai District.
      • Fighting at the Suez Canal, February 2-4, 1915.
    • Bedouin Arabs—Advance Guards of the Turkish Army which invaded Egypt in January 1915.    Photo, Central News.
    • The Suez Canal and the Sinai District.
    • Fighting at the Suez Canal, February 2-4, 1915.
    • The Turkish Attack on the Suez Canal.    By permission of The Sphere.
      • On the night of February 2nd, 1915, two Turkish columns, numbering about 12,000 in all, moved towards the canal—the front and smaller column against Ismalia; the second against Toussûm. Our illustration shows the latter attack in progress. To the right, the Turks are seen advancing under heavy shell and rifle fire, and vainly trying to launch boats. To the left are the Punjabis resisting the attack. The Turks were driven back at this point, and an attempt to cross at Ismalia suffered a similar fate. The Turks retired in good order, and unfortunately were able to march back to Syria without much molestation.
      • Men of "Princess Pat's" Canadian Light Infantry on the March. Photo, Central Press.
    • On the night of February 2nd, 1915, two Turkish columns, numbering about 12,000 in all, moved towards the canal—the front and smaller column against Ismalia; the second against Toussûm. Our illustration shows the latter attack in progress. To the right, the Turks are seen advancing under heavy shell and rifle fire, and vainly trying to launch boats. To the left are the Punjabis resisting the attack. The Turks were driven back at this point, and an attempt to cross at Ismalia suffered a similar fate. The Turks retired in good order, and unfortunately were able to march back to Syria without much molestation.
    • Men of "Princess Pat's" Canadian Light Infantry on the March. Photo, Central Press.
  • CHAPTER V.
    • WINTER WARFARE ON THE WESTERN FRONT.—I.
    • Canadians on Salisbury Plain.    Photo, Sport and General.
      • A portion of Stonehenge, the oldest monument in the British Isles, is seen in the background. It was ancient in the days when Boadicea called her kinsmen to arms against the Romans.
      • The La Bassée Canal in Time of Peace.
    • A portion of Stonehenge, the oldest monument in the British Isles, is seen in the background. It was ancient in the days when Boadicea called her kinsmen to arms against the Romans.
    • The La Bassée Canal in Time of Peace.
  • CHAPTER VI.
    • WINTER WARFARE ON THE WESTERN FRONT.—II.
    • The Fighting in Givenchy Village.
      • (From the drawing by Alfred Bastien. By permission of The Illustrated London News.) The mining village of Givenchy stands on high ground, and commands the highroad from Bethune to La Bassée. Our illustration shows the fierce fighting in the village on January 25, 1915, when our men in many cases fought with bayonets in their hands and even knocked out many Germans with their fists. In the above drawing, British troops, including Highlanders, are seen advancing from the left.
      • Sketch Map to illustrate the Fighting near La Bassée of the 1st Corps, January 25-26, 1915.
    • (From the drawing by Alfred Bastien. By permission of The Illustrated London News.) The mining village of Givenchy stands on high ground, and commands the highroad from Bethune to La Bassée. Our illustration shows the fierce fighting in the village on January 25, 1915, when our men in many cases fought with bayonets in their hands and even knocked out many Germans with their fists. In the above drawing, British troops, including Highlanders, are seen advancing from the left.
    • Sketch Map to illustrate the Fighting near La Bassée of the 1st Corps, January 25-26, 1915.
  • CHAPTER VII.
    • STORIES FROM THE BATTLEFIELD.
    • "The Three Musketeers" of Princess Patricia's Own.
      • (Painted by S. Begg from material supplied by an officer of Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry present at the action. By permission of The Illustrated London News.)
    • (Painted by S. Begg from material supplied by an officer of Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry present at the action. By permission of The Illustrated London News.)
    • The Great Exploit of Lance-Corporal Michael O'Leary.
      • (From the picture by A. C. Mitchell. By permission of The Illustrated London News.)
    • (From the picture by A. C. Mitchell. By permission of The Illustrated London News.)
  • CHAPTER VIII.
    • THE GERMAN SUCCESS AT SOISSONS.
  • CHAPTER IX.
    • WINTER FIGHTING IN CHAMPAGNE, THE ARGONNE, AND THE VOSGES.
    • French Infantry returning to their Quarters after driving the Germans from their Trenches near St. Mihiel.
      • (From the picture by Paul Thuriot. By permission of The Sphere.) The French infantry came back into their second line after the action with their bands playing and their colours flying. Their uniforms were covered with mud, and they were as dirty as they could possibly be. Their comrades saluted the colours with love and devotion, and the German prisoners seemed astonished to see such patriotic fervour.
      • Scene of the Fighting in Champagne.
      • The Fighting between the Meuse and the Moselle.
    • (From the picture by Paul Thuriot. By permission of The Sphere.) The French infantry came back into their second line after the action with their bands playing and their colours flying. Their uniforms were covered with mud, and they were as dirty as they could possibly be. Their comrades saluted the colours with love and devotion, and the German prisoners seemed astonished to see such patriotic fervour.
    • Scene of the Fighting in Champagne.
    • The Fighting between the Meuse and the Moselle.
    • Chasseurs Alpins attacking a Custom House in the High Vosges.
      • (From the picture by Paul Thuriot. By permission of The Sphere.) This incident took place in the district south of the Schlucht Pass. The blockhouse was defended by Germans. A French lieutenant rushed forward and attempted to batter down the door with his rifle, but was immediately shot. A second officer fell, and then the men rushed the house and captured it. The French soldiers shown in the picture are Chasseurs Alpins. Notice that some of them are on skis.
    • (From the picture by Paul Thuriot. By permission of The Sphere.) This incident took place in the district south of the Schlucht Pass. The blockhouse was defended by Germans. A French lieutenant rushed forward and attempted to batter down the door with his rifle, but was immediately shot. A second officer fell, and then the men rushed the house and captured it. The French soldiers shown in the picture are Chasseurs Alpins. Notice that some of them are on skis.
  • CHAPTER X.
    • THE SUBMARINE BLOCKADE BEGINS.
      • A German Submarine awash.    Photo, Central News.
    • A German Submarine awash.    Photo, Central News.
  • CHAPTER XI.
    • THE SINKING OF THE "LUSITANIA."
    • On the Face of the Waters—after the Sinking of the "Lusitania."
      • (By permission of the Illustrated London News.) We can never know all the acts of heroism and self-sacrifice which were performed when the passengers and crew of the Lusitania were struggling for life in the water, but we know that Mr. Vanderbilt, the American millionaire, though unable to swim, gave his life-belt to a woman, and remained steadfastly on the deck awaiting his end. One of the drowned sailors was found with a little child strapped to his back, and no doubt its weight cost the swimmer his life.
      • A German Submarine half submerged.
    • (By permission of the Illustrated London News.) We can never know all the acts of heroism and self-sacrifice which were performed when the passengers and crew of the Lusitania were struggling for life in the water, but we know that Mr. Vanderbilt, the American millionaire, though unable to swim, gave his life-belt to a woman, and remained steadfastly on the deck awaiting his end. One of the drowned sailors was found with a little child strapped to his back, and no doubt its weight cost the swimmer his life.
    • A German Submarine half submerged.
  • CHAPTER XII.
    • STORIES OF SUBMARINES.
    • Lieutenant Guy D'Oyly Hughes starting off with his Raft.
      • (Photo, Central News.)
    • (Photo, Central News.)
  • CHAPTER XIII.
    • MORE STORIES OF SUBMARINE WARFARE.
    • The End of a Submarine.
      • The cruiser has fired at the submarine and hit her, but to make assurance doubly sure, is now crashing down upon her at full speed.
    • The cruiser has fired at the submarine and hit her, but to make assurance doubly sure, is now crashing down upon her at full speed.
  • CHAPTER XIV.
    • WINTER FIGHTING IN POLAND AND EAST PRUSSIA.
    • The Russians retaking a Trench before Bolimov.
      • (By permission of The Illustrated London News.) The following account of the incident pictured above was given by a Russian soldier:—"They did not stay long when we came down on them with our bayonets. Our artillery had dropped many shells right in the trench before we got there. The machine guns played on us until the last minute, and we paused to fire at the gunners. The few Germans who were left tried to drag the guns away with them, but our men took them away from them."
      • The Battle on the Rawka.
      • Map to illustrate the German attack on the river line.
    • (By permission of The Illustrated London News.) The following account of the incident pictured above was given by a Russian soldier:—"They did not stay long when we came down on them with our bayonets. Our artillery had dropped many shells right in the trench before we got there. The machine guns played on us until the last minute, and we paused to fire at the gunners. The few Germans who were left tried to drag the guns away with them, but our men took them away from them."
    • The Battle on the Rawka.
    • Map to illustrate the German attack on the river line.
    • Austrian Trenches.  Photo, Topical Press.
      • This photograph gives a good idea of the way in which trenches are constructed and manned. It will be noticed that the front and rear trench communicate by means of a narrow cutting, and that the trenches are dug zigzag so that they cannot be enfiladed along the full length.
    • This photograph gives a good idea of the way in which trenches are constructed and manned. It will be noticed that the front and rear trench communicate by means of a narrow cutting, and that the trenches are dug zigzag so that they cannot be enfiladed along the full length.
  • CHAPTER XV.
    • A BATTLE OF THE MIDDLE AGES.
      • Scene of the Fighting round Przasnysz.
    • Scene of the Fighting round Przasnysz.
    • The Retreat of the Austrians across the Uzsok Pass.    By permission of The Sphere.
      • This spirited drawing shows Russian cavalry driving the Austrians across the snow-bound Uzsok Pass. (See page 120.) In this attack the Russians fell upon the flank and rear of the Austrians during a violent snowstorm, and pursued them for many miles. Hundreds of Austrians surrendered.
    • This spirited drawing shows Russian cavalry driving the Austrians across the snow-bound Uzsok Pass. (See page 120.) In this attack the Russians fell upon the flank and rear of the Austrians during a violent snowstorm, and pursued them for many miles. Hundreds of Austrians surrendered.
  • CHAPTER XVI.
    • THE FALL OF PRZEMYSL.
      • Position of the Russians in Galicia at the end of 1914.
    • Position of the Russians in Galicia at the end of 1914.
    • The Fall of Przemysl.
      • (From the picture by H. C. Seppings-Wright. By permission of The Illustrated London News.) This picture, which was drawn by the artist on the spot, shows Russians advancing to occupy the fortress, and passing on the way large numbers of Austrians who had been captured in the final sortie. The town of Przemysl is seen in the distance on the right. In the background are seen Austrian forts and a railway bridge being blown up. Almost in the middle of the picture a land-mine is exploding.
    • (From the picture by H. C. Seppings-Wright. By permission of The Illustrated London News.) This picture, which was drawn by the artist on the spot, shows Russians advancing to occupy the fortress, and passing on the way large numbers of Austrians who had been captured in the final sortie. The town of Przemysl is seen in the distance on the right. In the background are seen Austrian forts and a railway bridge being blown up. Almost in the middle of the picture a land-mine is exploding.
  • CHAPTER XVII.
    • STORIES FROM EASTERN BATTLEFIELDS.
  • CHAPTER XVIII.
    • THE BATTLE OF NEUVE CHAPELLE.
    • The Battle of Neuve Chapelle.
      • The black line shows the general position of the British front before the battle. A, 24th Brigade; B, 23rd Brigade; C, 25th Division; D, Garhwal Brigade; E, Dehra Dun Brigade.
    • The black line shows the general position of the British front before the battle. A, 24th Brigade; B, 23rd Brigade; C, 25th Division; D, Garhwal Brigade; E, Dehra Dun Brigade.
    • The Rifle Brigade racing headlong through the Ruins of Neuve Chapelle during the Attack on the Village.
      • (From the picture by Christopher Clark. By permission of The Sphere.) "The village," says a writer who visited the scene a few days after the battle, "was a sight that the men say they will never forget. Once upon a time Neuve Chapelle must have been a pretty little place, big as villages in these parts go, with a nice clean church (whence it probably got its name), some neat villas, half a dozen inns, a red-brick brewery, and on the outskirts a little old white château. Now hardly stone remains on stone. It was indeed a scene of desolation into which the Rifle Brigade—the first regiment to enter the village, I believe—raced headlong. Of the church only the bare shell remained; the interior was lost to view beneath a gigantic mound of rubbish. Of all that once fair village but two things remained intact—the great crucifixes reared aloft, one in the churchyard, the other over against the château. From the cross that is the emblem of our faith the figure of Christ, yet intact, though all pitted with bullet marks, looked down in mute agony on the slaying in the village."
    • (From the picture by Christopher Clark. By permission of The Sphere.) "The village," says a writer who visited the scene a few days after the battle, "was a sight that the men say they will never forget. Once upon a time Neuve Chapelle must have been a pretty little place, big as villages in these parts go, with a nice clean church (whence it probably got its name), some neat villas, half a dozen inns, a red-brick brewery, and on the outskirts a little old white château. Now hardly stone remains on stone. It was indeed a scene of desolation into which the Rifle Brigade—the first regiment to enter the village, I believe—raced headlong. Of the church only the bare shell remained; the interior was lost to view beneath a gigantic mound of rubbish. Of all that once fair village but two things remained intact—the great crucifixes reared aloft, one in the churchyard, the other over against the château. From the cross that is the emblem of our faith the figure of Christ, yet intact, though all pitted with bullet marks, looked down in mute agony on the slaying in the village."
    • Neuve Chapelle, March 10, 1915.
      • (From the drawing by D. Macpherson. By permission of The Sphere.) This picture shows a batch of the Prussian Guards surrendering to the 2nd Battalion of the Middlesex Regiment at the first line of trenches before the village of Neuve Chapelle. The distance at this point from the British advanced line was about sixty-five yards, and our men were upon the enemy while most of them were still dazed from the effects of the terrific bombardment. The prisoners were taken in batches of thirty or forty, and were handed over to the oncoming lines of supports until they were passed back to headquarters, the captors meanwhile sweeping on with the advance.
    • (From the drawing by D. Macpherson. By permission of The Sphere.) This picture shows a batch of the Prussian Guards surrendering to the 2nd Battalion of the Middlesex Regiment at the first line of trenches before the village of Neuve Chapelle. The distance at this point from the British advanced line was about sixty-five yards, and our men were upon the enemy while most of them were still dazed from the effects of the terrific bombardment. The prisoners were taken in batches of thirty or forty, and were handed over to the oncoming lines of supports until they were passed back to headquarters, the captors meanwhile sweeping on with the advance.
  • CHAPTER XIX.
    • SOLDIERS' STORIES OF NEUVE CHAPELLE.
    • Bengal Lancers returning from "Port Arthur" after the capture of Neuve Chapelle.
      • (From the picture by F. Matania. By permission of The Sphere.) Notice the "souvenirs" which they are carrying on their lances.
    • (From the picture by F. Matania. By permission of The Sphere.) Notice the "souvenirs" which they are carrying on their lances.
    • Lieutenant Cyril Martin and his grenade-throwing party in the enemy's trenches.
      • (By permission of The Illustrated London News.) In this drawing Lieutenant Martin is shown seated on the right, wounded.
    • (By permission of The Illustrated London News.) In this drawing Lieutenant Martin is shown seated on the right, wounded.
    • The "Prince George" Motor Ambulance at Buckingham Palace.
      • On January 26, 1916, Prince George travelled from Sandringham to Buckingham Palace, for the purpose of receiving our motor ambulance and handing it over to the Belgian Field Hospital. His Royal Highness spent a full half-hour in examining the motor ambulance and the hand ambulance which accompanied it, and was highly pleased with all that he saw. Our readers will remember this occasion, as it was Prince George's first public function. On the left of the Prince is his tutor, Mr. Hansell, M.A. The total cost of the motor ambulance, the hand ambulance, and a supply of "spares" amounted to £456. We are deeply indebted to Her Majesty the Queen for permission to reproduce this photograph, which is not to appear in any other book or periodical.
    • On January 26, 1916, Prince George travelled from Sandringham to Buckingham Palace, for the purpose of receiving our motor ambulance and handing it over to the Belgian Field Hospital. His Royal Highness spent a full half-hour in examining the motor ambulance and the hand ambulance which accompanied it, and was highly pleased with all that he saw. Our readers will remember this occasion, as it was Prince George's first public function. On the left of the Prince is his tutor, Mr. Hansell, M.A. The total cost of the motor ambulance, the hand ambulance, and a supply of "spares" amounted to £456. We are deeply indebted to Her Majesty the Queen for permission to reproduce this photograph, which is not to appear in any other book or periodical.
  • CHAPTER XX.
    • THE DARDANELLES.
      • The Dardanelles in Time of Peace.    Photo, Daily Mirror.
    • The Dardanelles in Time of Peace.    Photo, Daily Mirror.
  • CHAPTER XXI.
    • SHIPS VERSUS FORTS.
      • A Turkish Fort on the Asiatic side of the entrance to the Dardanelles.    Photo, Central News.
      • Map of the Dardanelles.
    • A Turkish Fort on the Asiatic side of the entrance to the Dardanelles.    Photo, Central News.
    • Map of the Dardanelles.
  • CHAPTER XXII.
    • HOW WE FAILED AT THE "NARROWS."
    • The Irresistible and the Ocean in Action.
      • (By permission of The Illustrated London News.) This picture, taken from the deck of a British warship, shows the Irresistible and Ocean shelling the Kum Kale and other forts on the Asiatic side. Both vessels were sunk on March 18, 1915, by drifting mines. (See page 175.)
    • (By permission of The Illustrated London News.) This picture, taken from the deck of a British warship, shows the Irresistible and Ocean shelling the Kum Kale and other forts on the Asiatic side. Both vessels were sunk on March 18, 1915, by drifting mines. (See page 175.)
  • CHAPTER XXIII.
    • THE STORY OF HILL 60.
    • Hill 60.
      • (From a sketch made just before its capture by the British. By permission of The Illustrated London News.)
    • (From a sketch made just before its capture by the British. By permission of The Illustrated London News.)
    • The first Territorial to win the V.C. An heroic Exploit on Hill 60.
      • (From the picture by R. Caton Woodville, from material supplied by men who fought in the action. By permission of The Illustrated London News.) "He successfully resisted all attacks on his trench and continued throwing bombs"—such was the exploit which won Lieutenant Geoffrey Harold Woolley the Victoria Cross. You will read the story of his heroism on page 187.
    • (From the picture by R. Caton Woodville, from material supplied by men who fought in the action. By permission of The Illustrated London News.) "He successfully resisted all attacks on his trench and continued throwing bombs"—such was the exploit which won Lieutenant Geoffrey Harold Woolley the Victoria Cross. You will read the story of his heroism on page 187.
  • CHAPTER XXIV.
    • THE POISONOUS CLOUD.
    • Second Battle of Ypres.
      • Sketch showing position at the Ypres salient on the morning of April 22, 1915.
    • Sketch showing position at the Ypres salient on the morning of April 22, 1915.
    • Stand to your Arms!    By permission of The Sphere.
      • The incident pictured above occurred when the Turcos were assailed by poison gas and fled from their trenches. When the first fugitives arrived on the outskirts of Ypres, some of our reserves gathered in groups, wondering what had happened and trying to find out what was the matter. Suddenly a staff officer rode up, shouting, "Stand to your arms!" and in a few minutes the troops had fallen in and were marching to the scene of the fight. "Nothing more impressive ran be imagined than the sight of our men falling in quietly and in perfect order amid the scene of wild confusion caused by the panic-stricken refugees who swarmed along the roads, striving to flee as quickly as possible from the German menace behind them."
    • The incident pictured above occurred when the Turcos were assailed by poison gas and fled from their trenches. When the first fugitives arrived on the outskirts of Ypres, some of our reserves gathered in groups, wondering what had happened and trying to find out what was the matter. Suddenly a staff officer rode up, shouting, "Stand to your arms!" and in a few minutes the troops had fallen in and were marching to the scene of the fight. "Nothing more impressive ran be imagined than the sight of our men falling in quietly and in perfect order amid the scene of wild confusion caused by the panic-stricken refugees who swarmed along the roads, striving to flee as quickly as possible from the German menace behind them."
  • CHAPTER XXV.
    • THE BATTLE GLORY OF CANADA.
    • Gassed!
      • (From the picture by F. Matania. By permission of The Sphere.) "The green mist came rolling towards the parapet from the enemy's empty front trench, several hundred yards away. It looked like a vapour rising from a marsh, and the wind was strong enough to carry it rapidly towards the parapet. One battalion had time to fire two rounds through the screen of gas before it came pouring over the sand-bags, penetrating into every crevice of the dug-outs, and choking the men who lay there. It was so thick at first that objects three feet distant could scarcely be seen."
    • (From the picture by F. Matania. By permission of The Sphere.) "The green mist came rolling towards the parapet from the enemy's empty front trench, several hundred yards away. It looked like a vapour rising from a marsh, and the wind was strong enough to carry it rapidly towards the parapet. One battalion had time to fire two rounds through the screen of gas before it came pouring over the sand-bags, penetrating into every crevice of the dug-outs, and choking the men who lay there. It was so thick at first that objects three feet distant could scarcely be seen."
    • The Fight in the Wood by Moonlight. Canadian Scottish and the 10th Infantry recapture lost guns at the point of the bayonet.
      • (By permission of the Illustrated London News.) "Instantly the word was given to charge, and on we rushed, cheering, yelling, shouting, straight for the foe. . . . Pressing on into the wood itself, the struggle became a dreadful hand-to-hand conflict; we fought in clumps and batches, and the living struggled over the bodies of the dead and dying. At the height of the conflict, while we were steadily driving the Germans before us, the moon burst out. The clashing bayonets flashed like quicksilver, and faces were lit up as by limelight." (See pages 194, 196.)
    • (By permission of the Illustrated London News.) "Instantly the word was given to charge, and on we rushed, cheering, yelling, shouting, straight for the foe. . . . Pressing on into the wood itself, the struggle became a dreadful hand-to-hand conflict; we fought in clumps and batches, and the living struggled over the bodies of the dead and dying. At the height of the conflict, while we were steadily driving the Germans before us, the moon burst out. The clashing bayonets flashed like quicksilver, and faces were lit up as by limelight." (See pages 194, 196.)
    • The Charge of the 4th Canadian Battalion.
      • (From the picture by Christopher Clark. By permission of The Sphere.) "The 4th Canadian Battalion at one time came under a particularly withering fire. For a moment—not more—it wavered. Its most gallant commanding officer, Lieutenant-Colonel Birchall, carrying, after an old fashion, a light cane, coolly and cheerfully rallied his men, and at the very moment when his example had infected them, fell dead at the head of his battalion. With a hoarse cry of anger they sprang forward as if to avenge his death. . . . After a hand-to-hand struggle the last German who resisted was bayoneted, and the trench was won."
    • (From the picture by Christopher Clark. By permission of The Sphere.) "The 4th Canadian Battalion at one time came under a particularly withering fire. For a moment—not more—it wavered. Its most gallant commanding officer, Lieutenant-Colonel Birchall, carrying, after an old fashion, a light cane, coolly and cheerfully rallied his men, and at the very moment when his example had infected them, fell dead at the head of his battalion. With a hoarse cry of anger they sprang forward as if to avenge his death. . . . After a hand-to-hand struggle the last German who resisted was bayoneted, and the trench was won."
  • CHAPTER XXVI.
    • DAYS OF STRUGGLE AND ANXIETY.—I.
    • Second Battle of Ypres.
      • Position on the morning of Friday, April 23, 1915.
    • Position on the morning of Friday, April 23, 1915.
    • Second Battle of Ypres.
      • The position on the evening of Saturday, April 24, 1915.
    • The position on the evening of Saturday, April 24, 1915.
  • CHAPTER XXVII.
    • DAYS OF STRUGGLE AND ANXIETY.—II.
    • "All that was left of them."
      • (By permission of The Illustrated London News.) When the wearied Canadians appeared on the outskirts of Ypres after their heroic struggle, their British comrades in the town turned out in crowds, lined the streets, and cheered and cheered again. The pipers of a Highland regiment put themselves at the head of the Canadian Scottish, and amidst scenes of great enthusiasm played them through the streets into camp.
    • (By permission of The Illustrated London News.) When the wearied Canadians appeared on the outskirts of Ypres after their heroic struggle, their British comrades in the town turned out in crowds, lined the streets, and cheered and cheered again. The pipers of a Highland regiment put themselves at the head of the Canadian Scottish, and amidst scenes of great enthusiasm played them through the streets into camp.
    • Second Battle of Ypres.
      • Sketch showing the shortening of the line on May 3, 1915.
    • Sketch showing the shortening of the line on May 3, 1915.
    • The Northumberland Fusiliers (the Fighting Fifth) beating off a German Attack.
      • (From the picture by Philip Dadd. By permission of The Sphere.) "It was in the early hours of morning that the Germans began to attack us in force. They battered our entanglements and our trench breastwork for some time, and part of the entanglements was actually blown across the trenches. Fortunately, we were able to meet them with steady and continuous rifle fire, and stopped the rush. . . . . In some cases the Germans were so bunched together that our men simply fired into the brown, it being impossible to miss them at such close range."
    • (From the picture by Philip Dadd. By permission of The Sphere.) "It was in the early hours of morning that the Germans began to attack us in force. They battered our entanglements and our trench breastwork for some time, and part of the entanglements was actually blown across the trenches. Fortunately, we were able to meet them with steady and continuous rifle fire, and stopped the rush. . . . . In some cases the Germans were so bunched together that our men simply fired into the brown, it being impossible to miss them at such close range."
  • CHAPTER XXVIII.
    • HEROES OF THE YPRES SALIENT.
    • Lance-Sergeant Belcher and his Men holding a battered Breastwork.
      • (From the picture by Philip Dadd. By permission of The Sphere.) The breastwork was knocked to pieces in places, and Sergeant Belcher determined to transfer his men to the unoccupied right wing of the work. Our picture shows the heroic little party at the moment when they were moving round the traverse. (See page 221.)
    • (From the picture by Philip Dadd. By permission of The Sphere.) The breastwork was knocked to pieces in places, and Sergeant Belcher determined to transfer his men to the unoccupied right wing of the work. Our picture shows the heroic little party at the moment when they were moving round the traverse. (See page 221.)
  • CHAPTER XXIX.
    • THE BATTLE OF THE ARTOIS.—I.
      • The French Offensive between Arras and Lens.
    • The French Offensive between Arras and Lens.
  • CHAPTER XXX.
    • THE BATTLE OF THE ARTOIS.—II.
    • A French Bayonet Charge in the "Labyrinth."
      • (By permission of The Illustrated London News.) In the left background is seen the cemetery of Neuville St. Vaast, through the walls of which French troops are seen advancing towards the Labyrinth. Our illustration shows the fighting reported by the French on June 6. At Neuville St. Vaast, said the report, we captured several houses, and drew closer to a redoubt on the north-west and occupied the communication trench which leads to it. We captured new trenches in the centre and in the south of the Labyrinth, and advanced a hundred yards. In this great work the struggle has continued without ceasing for eight days, and we now hold two-thirds of it.
    • (By permission of The Illustrated London News.) In the left background is seen the cemetery of Neuville St. Vaast, through the walls of which French troops are seen advancing towards the Labyrinth. Our illustration shows the fighting reported by the French on June 6. At Neuville St. Vaast, said the report, we captured several houses, and drew closer to a redoubt on the north-west and occupied the communication trench which leads to it. We captured new trenches in the centre and in the south of the Labyrinth, and advanced a hundred yards. In this great work the struggle has continued without ceasing for eight days, and we now hold two-thirds of it.
  • CHAPTER XXXI.
    • THE BATTLE OF FESTUBERT.
    • Playing their Comrades up to the Germans: the Pipers of the Black Watch at Richebourg.
      • (By permission of The Illustrated London News.) During the general advance in May the Black Watch suffered very heavily. They assaulted the German trenches a few miles east of Richebourg (point A on the map, page 231). Their first charge in the morning only reached the German wire, and they fell in swathes under the merciless machine-gun fire of the enemy. During the afternoon other companies of the Black Watch dashed up, and by a brilliant charge captured the trenches which had defied them in the morning. It was during this charge that the pipers showed wonderful courage. The two pipers of each company played their comrades right up to the Germans. The skirl of their pipes was heard above the din and crash of Maxims, rifles, and bursting shrapnel. The lads of "brown heath and shaggy wood" rushed on to victory with the pibroch of their sires ringing in their ears.
    • (By permission of The Illustrated London News.) During the general advance in May the Black Watch suffered very heavily. They assaulted the German trenches a few miles east of Richebourg (point A on the map, page 231). Their first charge in the morning only reached the German wire, and they fell in swathes under the merciless machine-gun fire of the enemy. During the afternoon other companies of the Black Watch dashed up, and by a brilliant charge captured the trenches which had defied them in the morning. It was during this charge that the pipers showed wonderful courage. The two pipers of each company played their comrades right up to the Germans. The skirl of their pipes was heard above the din and crash of Maxims, rifles, and bursting shrapnel. The lads of "brown heath and shaggy wood" rushed on to victory with the pibroch of their sires ringing in their ears.
  • CHAPTER XXXII.
    • THE HEROISMS OF FESTUBERT.
  • CHAPTER XXXIII.
    • THE GALLIPOLI PENINSULA.
  • CHAPTER XXXIV.
    • THE BATTLE OF THE LANDING.
    • How the Five Beaches—Y, X, W, V, and S—were stormed and the British and French landed on the Gallipoli Peninsula, Sunday, April 25, 1915.
      • (By permission of The Sphere.) The following units landed on the various beaches:—Beach Y: 1st King's Own Scottish Borderers and The Plymouth (Marine) Battalion, Royal Naval Division. Beach X: 1st Royal Fusiliers, together with a beach working party of the Anson Battalion, Royal Naval Division. Beach W: 1st Battalion, (Lancashire Fusiliers). Beach V: Dublin Fusiliers, Munster Fusiliers, half a battalion of the Hampshire Regiment, the West Riding Field Company, and other details. Beach S: 2nd South Wales Borderers (less one company). At Gaba Tepe: 3rd Australian Brigade, followed promptly by the 1st and 2nd Brigades and two batteries of Indian Mountain Artillery; the remainder of the New Zealand and Australian Division landed later in the day.
    • (By permission of The Sphere.) The following units landed on the various beaches:—Beach Y: 1st King's Own Scottish Borderers and The Plymouth (Marine) Battalion, Royal Naval Division. Beach X: 1st Royal Fusiliers, together with a beach working party of the Anson Battalion, Royal Naval Division. Beach W: 1st Battalion, (Lancashire Fusiliers). Beach V: Dublin Fusiliers, Munster Fusiliers, half a battalion of the Hampshire Regiment, the West Riding Field Company, and other details. Beach S: 2nd South Wales Borderers (less one company). At Gaba Tepe: 3rd Australian Brigade, followed promptly by the 1st and 2nd Brigades and two batteries of Indian Mountain Artillery; the remainder of the New Zealand and Australian Division landed later in the day.
    • The Lancashire Fusiliers landing on Beach W.
      • (By permission of The Illustrated London News.) You will read a full account of this heroic landing on pages 211, 212. Three Victoria Crosses were afterwards awarded to those who had displayed the most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty, by the vote of their comrades.
    • (By permission of The Illustrated London News.) You will read a full account of this heroic landing on pages 211, 212. Three Victoria Crosses were afterwards awarded to those who had displayed the most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty, by the vote of their comrades.
  • CHAPTER XXXV.
    • HEROES OF THE LANDING.
      • The Landing from the "River Clyde" on Beach V.    By permission of The Sphere.
    • The Landing from the "River Clyde" on Beach V.    By permission of The Sphere.
    • "In files they lay, like the mower's swathes at close of day." A Turkish Column wiped out by the Inniskilling Fusiliers.
      • (By permission of the Illustrated London News.) Our illustration shows the repulse of a Turkish night attack on our trenches near Achi Baba on May 1, 1915. On the extreme left of our position lay the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers and the Northern Irish Regiment, and in front of them was a small vineyard with a mud wall round it, the vine branches being entwined with a thick network of barbed wire. The Turks, led by German officers, moved directly on the Inniskillings; but the Irishmen lay low until their attackers were only a hundred and fifty yards away. Then light balls were fired from pistols, and a terrible torrent of lead swept the first line of the Turks to earth. The second line shared the same fate, and the survivors turned and fled. Several German officers were found shot amidst the heaps of slain next morning. (See page 267.)
    • (By permission of the Illustrated London News.) Our illustration shows the repulse of a Turkish night attack on our trenches near Achi Baba on May 1, 1915. On the extreme left of our position lay the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers and the Northern Irish Regiment, and in front of them was a small vineyard with a mud wall round it, the vine branches being entwined with a thick network of barbed wire. The Turks, led by German officers, moved directly on the Inniskillings; but the Irishmen lay low until their attackers were only a hundred and fifty yards away. Then light balls were fired from pistols, and a terrible torrent of lead swept the first line of the Turks to earth. The second line shared the same fate, and the survivors turned and fled. Several German officers were found shot amidst the heaps of slain next morning. (See page 267.)
  • CHAPTER XXXVI.
    • BATTERING AT THE BARRIERS.
  • CHAPTER XXXVII.
    • A SPLENDID FAILURE.
    • The "Anzac" Front.
      • The water-courses shown on the map are mostly dry in summer.
    • The water-courses shown on the map are mostly dry in summer.
    • Suvla Bay and the Neighbourhood.    By permission of The Sphere.
      • The landing took place on August 6-7, 1915. A beach where a landing was attempted was later abandoned, and the troops were put ashore at B and C. Notice the causeway across the Salt Lake, Lala Baba, Chocolate Hill, and Lone Pine Plateau to the south-east of Shrapnel Valley.
    • The landing took place on August 6-7, 1915. A beach where a landing was attempted was later abandoned, and the troops were put ashore at B and C. Notice the causeway across the Salt Lake, Lala Baba, Chocolate Hill, and Lone Pine Plateau to the south-east of Shrapnel Valley.
    • The Turkish Attack on our Troops at the foot of Chunuk Bair.    By permission of The Sphere.
      • The Turks "came on again and again, calling upon the name of God, determined to drive our men into the sea. . . . Our men stood to it, and maintained by many a deed of daring the old traditions of their race. There was no flinching. They died in the ranks where they stood." (See page 280.)
    • The Turks "came on again and again, calling upon the name of God, determined to drive our men into the sea. . . . Our men stood to it, and maintained by many a deed of daring the old traditions of their race. There was no flinching. They died in the ranks where they stood." (See page 280.)
    • How Lieutenant Forshaw won the V.C.
      • (From the picture by Philip Dodd. By permission of The Sphere.)
    • (From the picture by Philip Dodd. By permission of The Sphere.)
  • CHAPTER XXXVIII.
    • THE STORM BURSTS.
    • The Tornado of Fire which beat down upon the Russian Trenches on May 1, 1915.
      • (By permission of The Illustrated London News.)
      • The Russian Retreat from the Donajetz to the San.
    • (By permission of The Illustrated London News.)
    • The Russian Retreat from the Donajetz to the San.
    • A Night Scene before the City of Warsaw. An Engagement in Front of the doomed Capital.
      • (From the picture by Frédéric de Haenen. By permission of The Illustrated London News.) "Night fighting," says a correspondent, "is one of the splendid spectacles of war. Flashing batteries, wavering lines of musketry and machine-gun fire, make a picture painted in silver and gold on a background of black. The moon shines behind the gray clouds, shedding a soft radiance just strong enough to shape the shadows. On the western horizon flash after flash springs out of the darkness; these are the distant German guns. Nearer to us the Russian batteries are firing, each piece cutting a red flash of flame into the darkness before its muzzle. Suddenly a blazing rocket shoots up into the heavens and bursts into a shower of silver stars. As they fall slowly, the country beneath is lighted in high relief. A long arm of searchlight shoots across the heavens. A line of sparks reveals a battalion of the advancing enemy."
    • (From the picture by Frédéric de Haenen. By permission of The Illustrated London News.) "Night fighting," says a correspondent, "is one of the splendid spectacles of war. Flashing batteries, wavering lines of musketry and machine-gun fire, make a picture painted in silver and gold on a background of black. The moon shines behind the gray clouds, shedding a soft radiance just strong enough to shape the shadows. On the western horizon flash after flash springs out of the darkness; these are the distant German guns. Nearer to us the Russian batteries are firing, each piece cutting a red flash of flame into the darkness before its muzzle. Suddenly a blazing rocket shoots up into the heavens and bursts into a shower of silver stars. As they fall slowly, the country beneath is lighted in high relief. A long arm of searchlight shoots across the heavens. A line of sparks reveals a battalion of the advancing enemy."
  • CHAPTER XXXIX.
    • STORIES OF THE GREAT RETREAT.
    • Where the Cossacks score: a Cavalry Skirmish in the Rear of the Russian Retreat.
      • (By permission of The Graphic.)
    • (By permission of The Graphic.)
  • CHAPTER XL.
    • FROM STORM TO CALM.
    • Map illustrating the various Stages of the Russian Retreat.
      • A, after the fall of Lemberg; B, after the fall of Warsaw; C, after the fall of Grodno; D, after the fall of Vilna.
    • A, after the fall of Lemberg; B, after the fall of Warsaw; C, after the fall of Grodno; D, after the fall of Vilna.
    • The Tsar and Tsarevitch with the Russian Army.
      • (By permission of The Sphere.) The Tsarevitch, the eldest son of the Tsar, is the Grand Duke Alexis, who was born on August 12, 1904. He was therefore eleven years old when, on September 5, 1915, his father took command of the Russian armies. Both father and son are seen wearing the uniform of the Caucasian Cossacks.
    • (By permission of The Sphere.) The Tsarevitch, the eldest son of the Tsar, is the Grand Duke Alexis, who was born on August 12, 1904. He was therefore eleven years old when, on September 5, 1915, his father took command of the Russian armies. Both father and son are seen wearing the uniform of the Caucasian Cossacks.
    • The Coming of the Big Guns that mean Victory.
      • (By permission of The Illustrated London News.) Russian artillery being hauled through the snow to the battlefield by long teams of horses. By September 1915 the Russians had managed to provide themselves with sufficient artillery and ammunition to meet the Germans on equal terms.
    • (By permission of The Illustrated London News.) Russian artillery being hauled through the snow to the battlefield by long teams of horses. By September 1915 the Russians had managed to provide themselves with sufficient artillery and ammunition to meet the Germans on equal terms.
  • CHAPTER XLI.
    • MIDSUMMER ON THE WESTERN FRONT.
    • The Canadians in a Hot Corner.
      • (By permission of The Graphic.) Lieutenant Campbell hoisted his gun on to the broad back of his companion (Private Vincent) and poured a stream of bullets upon the enemy.
    • (By permission of The Graphic.) Lieutenant Campbell hoisted his gun on to the broad back of his companion (Private Vincent) and poured a stream of bullets upon the enemy.
    • Plan of the Hooge Area.
      • The black line shows German position on morning of July 30, 1915.
    • The black line shows German position on morning of July 30, 1915.
    • The Liverpool Scottish and other Regiments charging at Hooge.
      • (By permission of The Illustrated London News.) This picture shows the British charge at Hooge (June 16, 1915) which won the whole of the enemy's first-line trenches on a front of a thousand yards and parts of his second line. By noon on the day of this charge over a hundred and fifty prisoners had been passed to our rear. (See page 327.)
    • (By permission of The Illustrated London News.) This picture shows the British charge at Hooge (June 16, 1915) which won the whole of the enemy's first-line trenches on a front of a thousand yards and parts of his second line. By noon on the day of this charge over a hundred and fifty prisoners had been passed to our rear. (See page 327.)
    • Rushing a British Gun through the deserted streets of Ypres to a hard-pressed position on the Salient.
      • (By permission of The Sphere.) This picture illustrates the splendid dash with which the Horse Artillery bring up their guns to points of danger. It also shows the ruined condition of the beautiful old city of Ypres.
    • (By permission of The Sphere.) This picture illustrates the splendid dash with which the Horse Artillery bring up their guns to points of danger. It also shows the ruined condition of the beautiful old city of Ypres.
    • The September Battle in Champagne.
      • A. Showing the German front which the French attacked on the first day, September 25, 1915. B. Showing the position of the French front on September 29, 1915.
    • A. Showing the German front which the French attacked on the first day, September 25, 1915. B. Showing the position of the French front on September 29, 1915.
  • CHAPTER XLII.
    • IN CHAMPAGNE.
    • The Great French Advance in Champagne.    By permission of The Graphic.
      • While the British advanced between La Bassée and Lens, the French assaulted the German lines on a seventeen-mile front in Champagne. They carried all before them, and captured 21,000 prisoners and over 120 guns. A British surgeon who witnessed the onslaught tells us how the French dashed forward like an avalanche. "They are superb, these Frenchmen."
    • While the British advanced between La Bassée and Lens, the French assaulted the German lines on a seventeen-mile front in Champagne. They carried all before them, and captured 21,000 prisoners and over 120 guns. A British surgeon who witnessed the onslaught tells us how the French dashed forward like an avalanche. "They are superb, these Frenchmen."
  • CHAPTER XLIII.
    • THE BATTLE OF LOOS.—I.
      • Battle of Loos.—The Front from La Bassée to Lens.
    • Battle of Loos.—The Front from La Bassée to Lens.
    • The Storming of Loos Road Redoubt.
      • (By permission of The Illustrated London News.) This redoubt (see map, page 349) was a fortified tongue of land jutting out of the German first-line trench. It was semicircular in form, and was protected by a perfect jungle of barbed wire entanglements. The British guns smashed the redoubt to ruin, and on September 25, 1915, it was carried. (See page 357.)
    • (By permission of The Illustrated London News.) This redoubt (see map, page 349) was a fortified tongue of land jutting out of the German first-line trench. It was semicircular in form, and was protected by a perfect jungle of barbed wire entanglements. The British guns smashed the redoubt to ruin, and on September 25, 1915, it was carried. (See page 357.)
  • CHAPTER XLIV.
    • THE BATTLE OF LOOS.—II.
    • British Troops swarming over the German First Line Trenches and dashing onwards towards Loos, the "Tower Bridge," and Hill 70.
      • (From the drawing by S. Begg. By permission of The Illustrated London News.) Notice the Tower Bridge, as it was called by our soldiers. It was the head-gear of a pit, and consisted of twin towers connected by a bridge. It had been seen by our men, foreshortened over the downs, for many months past. They believed that the Germans had constructed it before the war as an observation station.
    • (From the drawing by S. Begg. By permission of The Illustrated London News.) Notice the Tower Bridge, as it was called by our soldiers. It was the head-gear of a pit, and consisted of twin towers connected by a bridge. It had been seen by our men, foreshortened over the downs, for many months past. They believed that the Germans had constructed it before the war as an observation station.
    • A Scottish Highlander rescuing a French Girl in the Village of Loos.
      • Many moving incidents took place when the British entered Loos. Many of the inhabitants, who had been living in the cellars, came out to heap blessings on the head of their deliverers. A Highlander is here seen carrying a fainting French girl into a place of safety.
    • Many moving incidents took place when the British entered Loos. Many of the inhabitants, who had been living in the cellars, came out to heap blessings on the head of their deliverers. A Highlander is here seen carrying a fainting French girl into a place of safety.
  • CHAPTER XLV.
    • BRAVEST OF THE BRAVE.—I.
    • Piper Daniel Laidlaw outside the British Trench playing "Blue Bonnets over the Border" to hearten his comrades to the Attack.
      • (From the picture by S. Begg. By permission of The Illustrated London News.)
    • (From the picture by S. Begg. By permission of The Illustrated London News.)
  • CHAPTER XLVI.
    • BRAVEST OF THE BRAVE.—II.
    • His Majesty the King and Lance-Sergeant Oliver Brooks.
      • (From the drawing by S. Begg. By permission of The Illustrated London News.)
    • (From the drawing by S. Begg. By permission of The Illustrated London News.)
    • The Martyrdom of Edith Cavell.
      • (From the picture by A. Forestier. By permission of The Illustrated London News.) When the news of Nurse Cavell's murder was received, the following message was sent to her mother: "By command of the King and Queen I write to assure you that the hearts of their Majesties go out to you in your bitter sorrow, and to express their horror at the appalling deed which has robbed you of your child. Men and women throughout the civilized world, while sympathizing with you, are moved to admiration and awe at her faith and courage in death."
    • (From the picture by A. Forestier. By permission of The Illustrated London News.) When the news of Nurse Cavell's murder was received, the following message was sent to her mother: "By command of the King and Queen I write to assure you that the hearts of their Majesties go out to you in your bitter sorrow, and to express their horror at the appalling deed which has robbed you of your child. Men and women throughout the civilized world, while sympathizing with you, are moved to admiration and awe at her faith and courage in death."
  • CHAPTER XLVII.
    • THE WAR IN THE AIR.
    • A German Machine brought down and fired by a British Battle-plane.
      • (From the drawing by John de G. Bryan. By permission of The Illustrated London News.) This picture illustrates the splendid feat by which Second Lieutenant Insall won the Victoria Cross. (See page 384.)
    • (From the drawing by John de G. Bryan. By permission of The Illustrated London News.) This picture illustrates the splendid feat by which Second Lieutenant Insall won the Victoria Cross. (See page 384.)
  • CHAPTER XLVIII.
    • HEROES OF THE AIR.
  • CHAPTER XLIX.
    • THE COMING OF THE ZEPPELINS.
    • Sub-Lieutenant Warneford bombing a Zeppelin in Mid-air.
      • (By permission of The Graphic.) A description of this exploit, which won Sub-Lieutenant Warneford the Victoria Cross, is given on page 382.
    • (By permission of The Graphic.) A description of this exploit, which won Sub-Lieutenant Warneford the Victoria Cross, is given on page 382.
  • CHAPTER L.
    • THE OVERRUNNING OF SERBIA.
      • Map to illustrate the Campaign in Serbia.
    • Map to illustrate the Campaign in Serbia.
    • "Remote, unfriended, melancholy, slow."
      • (From the picture by F. Matania. By permission of the Sphere.) This picture shows old King Peter and his court retreating on foot through the snows of winter into the wilds of Albania.
    • (From the picture by F. Matania. By permission of the Sphere.) This picture shows old King Peter and his court retreating on foot through the snows of winter into the wilds of Albania.
    • END OF VOLUME IV.
      • PRINTED IN GREAT BRITAIN.
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • PRINTED IN GREAT BRITAIN.
    • FOOTNOTES:
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