The Childrens' Story of the War, Volume 3 (of 10) From the First Battle of Ypres to the End of the Year 1914
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The Childrens' Story of the War, Volume 3 (of 10) From the First Battle of Ypres to the End of the Year 1914

By Edward Parrott
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Table of Contents
  • British Aeroplanes attacking the Zeppelin Factory at Friedrichshafen.
    • On November 21, 1914, three British aeroplanes flew from France across the mountains into Germany, a distance of 250 miles, and dropped bombs on the Zeppelin factory at Friedrichshafen, on the shores of Lake Constance. Serious damage was done, and all the pilots but one returned safely. Another daring air raid was made on Christmas Day 1914 by seven aeroplanes on German warships lying off Cuxhaven.
    • THE
  • CHILDREN'S STORY
  • OF THE WAR
    • by
    • SIR EDWARD PARROTT, M.A., LL.D.
      • AUTHOR OF "BRITAIN OVERSEAS," "THE PAGEANT OF ENGLISH LITERATURE," ETC.
      • From the First Battle of Ypres to the End of the Year 1914
    • AUTHOR OF "BRITAIN OVERSEAS," "THE PAGEANT OF ENGLISH LITERATURE," ETC.
    • From the First Battle of Ypres to the End of the Year 1914
    • THOMAS NELSON AND SONS, Ltd.
      • LONDON, EDINBURGH, PARIS, AND NEW YORK 1916
    • LONDON, EDINBURGH, PARIS, AND NEW YORK 1916
    • CONTENTS.
    • CHAPTER I.
      • A GLANCE BACKWARDS.
      • The Kaiser in the Field.    Photo: Central News.
        • This remarkable Photograph shows the German Emperor directing the operations of his troops in Flanders.
      • This remarkable Photograph shows the German Emperor directing the operations of his troops in Flanders.
      • Montenegrin Artillery in Action.    Photo, Daily Mirror.
        • Montenegro is the smallest kingdom in Europe, and consists of lofty highlands of gray, broken rock. The Montenegrins are said to be the finest and strongest race in Europe. They are born warriors, and their average height is six feet. They are of kindred race to the Serbians, and in this great war they have thrown in their lot with them.
      • Montenegro is the smallest kingdom in Europe, and consists of lofty highlands of gray, broken rock. The Montenegrins are said to be the finest and strongest race in Europe. They are born warriors, and their average height is six feet. They are of kindred race to the Serbians, and in this great war they have thrown in their lot with them.
      • German Soldiers leaving Berlin for the Front.
        • An amateur artist is drawing a caricature of General Joffre on the side of the carriage.
      • An amateur artist is drawing a caricature of General Joffre on the side of the carriage.
      • A Hand-to-hand Fight during the Battle of the Marne.    By permission of the Sphere.
        • The action here illustrated took place on the South bank of the Marne, where the Germans found themselves attacked by French colonial troops. The Germans were soon beaten back, after a fierce affray amidst burning houses and broken barricades.
      • The action here illustrated took place on the South bank of the Marne, where the Germans found themselves attacked by French colonial troops. The Germans were soon beaten back, after a fierce affray amidst burning houses and broken barricades.
      • Motor-cyclist Dispatch Rider breaking through a Patrol of Uhlans.    By permission of The Sphere.
        • The motor-cyclist enables communications to be kept up, and messages to be sent to and from headquarters all along the far-extended lines of the Allies. Adventures similar to that illustrated above were common in the early stages of the war.
      • The motor-cyclist enables communications to be kept up, and messages to be sent to and from headquarters all along the far-extended lines of the Allies. Adventures similar to that illustrated above were common in the early stages of the war.
    • A GLANCE BACKWARDS.
    • The Kaiser in the Field.    Photo: Central News.
      • This remarkable Photograph shows the German Emperor directing the operations of his troops in Flanders.
    • This remarkable Photograph shows the German Emperor directing the operations of his troops in Flanders.
    • Montenegrin Artillery in Action.    Photo, Daily Mirror.
      • Montenegro is the smallest kingdom in Europe, and consists of lofty highlands of gray, broken rock. The Montenegrins are said to be the finest and strongest race in Europe. They are born warriors, and their average height is six feet. They are of kindred race to the Serbians, and in this great war they have thrown in their lot with them.
    • Montenegro is the smallest kingdom in Europe, and consists of lofty highlands of gray, broken rock. The Montenegrins are said to be the finest and strongest race in Europe. They are born warriors, and their average height is six feet. They are of kindred race to the Serbians, and in this great war they have thrown in their lot with them.
    • German Soldiers leaving Berlin for the Front.
      • An amateur artist is drawing a caricature of General Joffre on the side of the carriage.
    • An amateur artist is drawing a caricature of General Joffre on the side of the carriage.
    • A Hand-to-hand Fight during the Battle of the Marne.    By permission of the Sphere.
      • The action here illustrated took place on the South bank of the Marne, where the Germans found themselves attacked by French colonial troops. The Germans were soon beaten back, after a fierce affray amidst burning houses and broken barricades.
    • The action here illustrated took place on the South bank of the Marne, where the Germans found themselves attacked by French colonial troops. The Germans were soon beaten back, after a fierce affray amidst burning houses and broken barricades.
    • Motor-cyclist Dispatch Rider breaking through a Patrol of Uhlans.    By permission of The Sphere.
      • The motor-cyclist enables communications to be kept up, and messages to be sent to and from headquarters all along the far-extended lines of the Allies. Adventures similar to that illustrated above were common in the early stages of the war.
    • The motor-cyclist enables communications to be kept up, and messages to be sent to and from headquarters all along the far-extended lines of the Allies. Adventures similar to that illustrated above were common in the early stages of the war.
    • CHAPTER II.
      • SOME GERMAN THEORIES OF WAR.
        • Fig. 1. Column advancing to the Attack in Close Order.
        • Fig. 2. Column deploying for Attack in Open Order.
      • Fig. 1. Column advancing to the Attack in Close Order.
      • Fig. 2. Column deploying for Attack in Open Order.
      • A German Howitzer for Siege Work.    Photo, Daily Mirror.
        • Notice the caterpillar wheels which enable it to traverse soft roads without sinking in.
      • Notice the caterpillar wheels which enable it to traverse soft roads without sinking in.
      • The Effect of Shrapnel on Trenches.
        • Some four hundred to five hundred balls and splinters spread forwards, downwards, and fan-wise when the shell bursts. (By permission of The Sphere.)
      • Some four hundred to five hundred balls and splinters spread forwards, downwards, and fan-wise when the shell bursts. (By permission of The Sphere.)
      • The Effect of High Explosive Shells on Trenches.
        • A breach is made in the wire entanglements and the chief force of the explosion is downwards. (By permission of The Sphere.)
      • A breach is made in the wire entanglements and the chief force of the explosion is downwards. (By permission of The Sphere.)
    • SOME GERMAN THEORIES OF WAR.
      • Fig. 1. Column advancing to the Attack in Close Order.
      • Fig. 2. Column deploying for Attack in Open Order.
    • Fig. 1. Column advancing to the Attack in Close Order.
    • Fig. 2. Column deploying for Attack in Open Order.
    • A German Howitzer for Siege Work.    Photo, Daily Mirror.
      • Notice the caterpillar wheels which enable it to traverse soft roads without sinking in.
    • Notice the caterpillar wheels which enable it to traverse soft roads without sinking in.
    • The Effect of Shrapnel on Trenches.
      • Some four hundred to five hundred balls and splinters spread forwards, downwards, and fan-wise when the shell bursts. (By permission of The Sphere.)
    • Some four hundred to five hundred balls and splinters spread forwards, downwards, and fan-wise when the shell bursts. (By permission of The Sphere.)
    • The Effect of High Explosive Shells on Trenches.
      • A breach is made in the wire entanglements and the chief force of the explosion is downwards. (By permission of The Sphere.)
    • A breach is made in the wire entanglements and the chief force of the explosion is downwards. (By permission of The Sphere.)
    • CHAPTER III.
      • FROM ARRAS TO ARMENTIÈRES.
        • Bird's-eye View of the Country from Arras to the Sea.
      • Bird's-eye View of the Country from Arras to the Sea.
      • Brothers in Arms.    Photo, Alfieri.
        • A British and a French soldier chatting together in Flanders.
      • A British and a French soldier chatting together in Flanders.
    • FROM ARRAS TO ARMENTIÈRES.
      • Bird's-eye View of the Country from Arras to the Sea.
    • Bird's-eye View of the Country from Arras to the Sea.
    • Brothers in Arms.    Photo, Alfieri.
      • A British and a French soldier chatting together in Flanders.
    • A British and a French soldier chatting together in Flanders.
    • CHAPTER IV.
      • FROM LILLE TO NIEUPORT.
        • The Cloth Hall at Ypres before Bombardment.
        • Map illustrating Marlborough's Campaigns in Artois and West Flanders.
      • The Cloth Hall at Ypres before Bombardment.
      • Map illustrating Marlborough's Campaigns in Artois and West Flanders.
      • The Battle of Malplaquet (September 11, 1709).
        • (From the picture by Jan van Huchtenburgh).
        • John Churchill, first Duke of Marlborough. (Photo by Walker and Cockerell, from the painting in the National Portrait Gallery.)
      • (From the picture by Jan van Huchtenburgh).
      • John Churchill, first Duke of Marlborough. (Photo by Walker and Cockerell, from the painting in the National Portrait Gallery.)
    • FROM LILLE TO NIEUPORT.
      • The Cloth Hall at Ypres before Bombardment.
      • Map illustrating Marlborough's Campaigns in Artois and West Flanders.
    • The Cloth Hall at Ypres before Bombardment.
    • Map illustrating Marlborough's Campaigns in Artois and West Flanders.
    • The Battle of Malplaquet (September 11, 1709).
      • (From the picture by Jan van Huchtenburgh).
      • John Churchill, first Duke of Marlborough. (Photo by Walker and Cockerell, from the painting in the National Portrait Gallery.)
    • (From the picture by Jan van Huchtenburgh).
    • John Churchill, first Duke of Marlborough. (Photo by Walker and Cockerell, from the painting in the National Portrait Gallery.)
    • CHAPTER V.
      • MAUD'HUY AT ARRAS, AND THE RETREAT FROM ANTWERP.
      • A Battle amidst the Coal Trucks of Lens.
        • (From the picture by Paul Thiriat. By permission of The Sphere.)
      • (From the picture by Paul Thiriat. By permission of The Sphere.)
    • MAUD'HUY AT ARRAS, AND THE RETREAT FROM ANTWERP.
    • A Battle amidst the Coal Trucks of Lens.
      • (From the picture by Paul Thiriat. By permission of The Sphere.)
    • (From the picture by Paul Thiriat. By permission of The Sphere.)
    • CHAPTER VI.
      • WITH RAWLINSON IN BELGIUM.
        • Bavarian Troops leaving Antwerp for the Dash on Calais.
      • Bavarian Troops leaving Antwerp for the Dash on Calais.
    • WITH RAWLINSON IN BELGIUM.
      • Bavarian Troops leaving Antwerp for the Dash on Calais.
    • Bavarian Troops leaving Antwerp for the Dash on Calais.
    • CHAPTER VII.
      • THE LONG, THIN LINE OF STEEL AND VALOUR.
        • Weary Belgian Soldiers resting on the Banks of the Yser River after their Retreat from Antwerp.    Photo, Daily Mirror.
      • Weary Belgian Soldiers resting on the Banks of the Yser River after their Retreat from Antwerp.    Photo, Daily Mirror.
      • The Fighting about La Bassée.
        • Sketch map showing front held by the Second Corps on October 19, on night of October 22, and about mid-November 1914.
      • Sketch map showing front held by the Second Corps on October 19, on night of October 22, and about mid-November 1914.
    • THE LONG, THIN LINE OF STEEL AND VALOUR.
      • Weary Belgian Soldiers resting on the Banks of the Yser River after their Retreat from Antwerp.    Photo, Daily Mirror.
    • Weary Belgian Soldiers resting on the Banks of the Yser River after their Retreat from Antwerp.    Photo, Daily Mirror.
    • The Fighting about La Bassée.
      • Sketch map showing front held by the Second Corps on October 19, on night of October 22, and about mid-November 1914.
    • Sketch map showing front held by the Second Corps on October 19, on night of October 22, and about mid-November 1914.
    • CHAPTER VIII.
      • THE WORK OF THE THIRD BRITISH CORPS.
      • British Cavalry entering Warneton.
        • The enemy was posted behind a high loopholed barricade, which was blown to pieces by British guns; whereupon our cavalry entered the town, but could not maintain themselves within it.
        • The Allied Line from La Bassée to the Sea about October 20.
      • The enemy was posted behind a high loopholed barricade, which was blown to pieces by British guns; whereupon our cavalry entered the town, but could not maintain themselves within it.
      • The Allied Line from La Bassée to the Sea about October 20.
    • THE WORK OF THE THIRD BRITISH CORPS.
    • British Cavalry entering Warneton.
      • The enemy was posted behind a high loopholed barricade, which was blown to pieces by British guns; whereupon our cavalry entered the town, but could not maintain themselves within it.
      • The Allied Line from La Bassée to the Sea about October 20.
    • The enemy was posted behind a high loopholed barricade, which was blown to pieces by British guns; whereupon our cavalry entered the town, but could not maintain themselves within it.
    • The Allied Line from La Bassée to the Sea about October 20.
    • CHAPTER IX.
      • STIRRING STORIES OF ANXIOUS DAYS.
      • Miss Jessica Borthwick steering the Grace Darling out of Ostend Harbour.
        • (Photo, Sport and General.)
        • The Arrows of Death.
      • (Photo, Sport and General.)
      • The Arrows of Death.
    • STIRRING STORIES OF ANXIOUS DAYS.
    • Miss Jessica Borthwick steering the Grace Darling out of Ostend Harbour.
      • (Photo, Sport and General.)
      • The Arrows of Death.
    • (Photo, Sport and General.)
    • The Arrows of Death.
    • CHAPTER X.
      • WITH THE SECOND CORPS.
    • WITH THE SECOND CORPS.
    • CHAPTER XI.
      • THE INDIANS IN THE TRENCHES.
      • A Night Attack by Pathans.
        • The People of Afghanistan and the adjoining borderland of India are known as Pathans (Pat-ans'), and their language as Pushtu. They include all the strongest and most warlike tribes of the North-West Frontier Province, and make excellent soldiers. The Afridis (Af-ree' dees), against whom 35,000 British and Indian troops made a campaign in 1897-98, are Pathans. The Khaibar Pass, that great gloomy defile in the mountain barrier, through which every invader of India except the European has had to fight his way, is jealously guarded by Afridis in the pay of Britain.
      • The People of Afghanistan and the adjoining borderland of India are known as Pathans (Pat-ans'), and their language as Pushtu. They include all the strongest and most warlike tribes of the North-West Frontier Province, and make excellent soldiers. The Afridis (Af-ree' dees), against whom 35,000 British and Indian troops made a campaign in 1897-98, are Pathans. The Khaibar Pass, that great gloomy defile in the mountain barrier, through which every invader of India except the European has had to fight his way, is jealously guarded by Afridis in the pay of Britain.
      • Two London Scots and a Wounded Gurkha.
        • (Photo, Sport and General.)
      • (Photo, Sport and General.)
    • THE INDIANS IN THE TRENCHES.
    • A Night Attack by Pathans.
      • The People of Afghanistan and the adjoining borderland of India are known as Pathans (Pat-ans'), and their language as Pushtu. They include all the strongest and most warlike tribes of the North-West Frontier Province, and make excellent soldiers. The Afridis (Af-ree' dees), against whom 35,000 British and Indian troops made a campaign in 1897-98, are Pathans. The Khaibar Pass, that great gloomy defile in the mountain barrier, through which every invader of India except the European has had to fight his way, is jealously guarded by Afridis in the pay of Britain.
    • The People of Afghanistan and the adjoining borderland of India are known as Pathans (Pat-ans'), and their language as Pushtu. They include all the strongest and most warlike tribes of the North-West Frontier Province, and make excellent soldiers. The Afridis (Af-ree' dees), against whom 35,000 British and Indian troops made a campaign in 1897-98, are Pathans. The Khaibar Pass, that great gloomy defile in the mountain barrier, through which every invader of India except the European has had to fight his way, is jealously guarded by Afridis in the pay of Britain.
    • Two London Scots and a Wounded Gurkha.
      • (Photo, Sport and General.)
    • (Photo, Sport and General.)
    • CHAPTER XII.
      • FIRE AND FLOOD.
      • British Monitors shelling German Trenches.
        • Note the aeroplane and the balloon directing the fire of the monitors' guns.
        • The Würtembergers' Attack on Ramscappelle.    By permission of The Sphere.
        • The Flooded Area in Flanders.    Photo, Daily Mirror.
      • Note the aeroplane and the balloon directing the fire of the monitors' guns.
      • The Würtembergers' Attack on Ramscappelle.    By permission of The Sphere.
      • The Flooded Area in Flanders.    Photo, Daily Mirror.
    • FIRE AND FLOOD.
    • British Monitors shelling German Trenches.
      • Note the aeroplane and the balloon directing the fire of the monitors' guns.
      • The Würtembergers' Attack on Ramscappelle.    By permission of The Sphere.
      • The Flooded Area in Flanders.    Photo, Daily Mirror.
    • Note the aeroplane and the balloon directing the fire of the monitors' guns.
    • The Würtembergers' Attack on Ramscappelle.    By permission of The Sphere.
    • The Flooded Area in Flanders.    Photo, Daily Mirror.
    • CHAPTER XIII.
      • EIGHT DAYS OF STRUGGLE AND ANXIETY.
      • Diagram of the Ypres Salient.
        • The two shadings indicate two stages in the German advance.
        • British Troops advancing for an Attack.    Photo, Sport and General.
      • The two shadings indicate two stages in the German advance.
      • British Troops advancing for an Attack.    Photo, Sport and General.
      • Hands up! Capture of Germans near Langemarck by the Cameron Highlanders.
        • On October 23, 1914, about a hundred Germans had been compelled to take cover behind a mill and a small house. The house was rushed by a small force of the Camerons, who compelled the Germans to hold up their hands until a sufficiently strong guard arrived to take them to the rear. From the picture by F. Matania. By permission of The Sphere.
        • The Front at Ypres on October 27, 1914.
      • On October 23, 1914, about a hundred Germans had been compelled to take cover behind a mill and a small house. The house was rushed by a small force of the Camerons, who compelled the Germans to hold up their hands until a sufficiently strong guard arrived to take them to the rear. From the picture by F. Matania. By permission of The Sphere.
      • The Front at Ypres on October 27, 1914.
      • An Admiral of the Air.    Photo, Cribb.
        • Wing-Commander C. R. Samson, R.N. See page 74.
      • Wing-Commander C. R. Samson, R.N. See page 74.
    • EIGHT DAYS OF STRUGGLE AND ANXIETY.
    • Diagram of the Ypres Salient.
      • The two shadings indicate two stages in the German advance.
      • British Troops advancing for an Attack.    Photo, Sport and General.
    • The two shadings indicate two stages in the German advance.
    • British Troops advancing for an Attack.    Photo, Sport and General.
    • Hands up! Capture of Germans near Langemarck by the Cameron Highlanders.
      • On October 23, 1914, about a hundred Germans had been compelled to take cover behind a mill and a small house. The house was rushed by a small force of the Camerons, who compelled the Germans to hold up their hands until a sufficiently strong guard arrived to take them to the rear. From the picture by F. Matania. By permission of The Sphere.
      • The Front at Ypres on October 27, 1914.
    • On October 23, 1914, about a hundred Germans had been compelled to take cover behind a mill and a small house. The house was rushed by a small force of the Camerons, who compelled the Germans to hold up their hands until a sufficiently strong guard arrived to take them to the rear. From the picture by F. Matania. By permission of The Sphere.
    • The Front at Ypres on October 27, 1914.
    • An Admiral of the Air.    Photo, Cribb.
      • Wing-Commander C. R. Samson, R.N. See page 74.
    • Wing-Commander C. R. Samson, R.N. See page 74.
    • CHAPTER XIV.
      • TALES OF HEROES.
        • The R.A.M.C. rendering First Aid in the Trenches.    By permission of The Sphere.
      • The R.A.M.C. rendering First Aid in the Trenches.    By permission of The Sphere.
      • French Officers examining a German Prisoner.
        • (Photo, Central News.)
      • (Photo, Central News.)
      • How Lieutenant Leach and Sergeant Hogan recaptured a Trench from the Germans.
        • (From the picture by F. Matania. By permission of The Sphere.)
        • Diagram to illustrate Trench Warfare.
      • (From the picture by F. Matania. By permission of The Sphere.)
      • Diagram to illustrate Trench Warfare.
    • TALES OF HEROES.
      • The R.A.M.C. rendering First Aid in the Trenches.    By permission of The Sphere.
    • The R.A.M.C. rendering First Aid in the Trenches.    By permission of The Sphere.
    • French Officers examining a German Prisoner.
      • (Photo, Central News.)
    • (Photo, Central News.)
    • How Lieutenant Leach and Sergeant Hogan recaptured a Trench from the Germans.
      • (From the picture by F. Matania. By permission of The Sphere.)
      • Diagram to illustrate Trench Warfare.
    • (From the picture by F. Matania. By permission of The Sphere.)
    • Diagram to illustrate Trench Warfare.
    • CHAPTER XV.
      • THE CRISIS OF THE FIRST BATTLE OF YPRES.
      • The French and British Commanders in the Field—General Joffre and General Sir John French.
        • (By permission of The Sphere.)
        • The Scratch Force that saved de Moussy's Line.    Photo, Daily Mirror.
      • (By permission of The Sphere.)
      • The Scratch Force that saved de Moussy's Line.    Photo, Daily Mirror.
      • The Charge of the London Scottish at Messines, November 1, 1914.
        • (From the picture by Dudley Tennant.)
      • (From the picture by Dudley Tennant.)
    • THE CRISIS OF THE FIRST BATTLE OF YPRES.
    • The French and British Commanders in the Field—General Joffre and General Sir John French.
      • (By permission of The Sphere.)
      • The Scratch Force that saved de Moussy's Line.    Photo, Daily Mirror.
    • (By permission of The Sphere.)
    • The Scratch Force that saved de Moussy's Line.    Photo, Daily Mirror.
    • The Charge of the London Scottish at Messines, November 1, 1914.
      • (From the picture by Dudley Tennant.)
    • (From the picture by Dudley Tennant.)
    • CHAPTER XVI.
      • THE PRICE OF VICTORY AND THE PASSING OF A HERO.
      • The Defeat of the Prussian Guard near Ypres on November 11, 1914. (See page 143.)
        • (By permission of The Sphere.)
        • Earl Roberts of Kandahar.
        • "CHILDREN OF THE EMPIRE:
      • (By permission of The Sphere.)
      • Earl Roberts of Kandahar.
      • "CHILDREN OF THE EMPIRE:
      • Funeral of Field-Marshal Lord Roberts: the Procession in the Rain, on the way to St. Paul's Cathedral, London.
        • (By permission of The Sphere.)
      • (By permission of The Sphere.)
    • THE PRICE OF VICTORY AND THE PASSING OF A HERO.
    • The Defeat of the Prussian Guard near Ypres on November 11, 1914. (See page 143.)
      • (By permission of The Sphere.)
      • Earl Roberts of Kandahar.
      • "CHILDREN OF THE EMPIRE:
    • (By permission of The Sphere.)
    • Earl Roberts of Kandahar.
    • "CHILDREN OF THE EMPIRE:
    • Funeral of Field-Marshal Lord Roberts: the Procession in the Rain, on the way to St. Paul's Cathedral, London.
      • (By permission of The Sphere.)
    • (By permission of The Sphere.)
    • CHAPTER XVII.
      • TALES FROM THE TRENCHES.
      • How the Breton Marines held Dixmude. (See page 96.)
        • (From the picture by Paul Thiriat. By permission of The Sphere.)
      • (From the picture by Paul Thiriat. By permission of The Sphere.)
    • TALES FROM THE TRENCHES.
    • How the Breton Marines held Dixmude. (See page 96.)
      • (From the picture by Paul Thiriat. By permission of The Sphere.)
    • (From the picture by Paul Thiriat. By permission of The Sphere.)
    • CHAPTER XVIII.
      • MORE TALES FROM THE TRENCHES.
      • A Pleasant Scene in the Grand Place at Arras.
        • (From the picture by D. Macpherson. By permission of The Sphere.) A correspondent says: "In the early afternoon I saw in the huge Grand Place at Arras (one of the relics of the long occupation by the Spanish) the prettiest of scenes. A squadron of French dragoons had halted there, and the men had dismounted. The long row of horses had each a new master, for the dragoons had put children into the saddle, and each child had on its head a dragoon's casque."
      • (From the picture by D. Macpherson. By permission of The Sphere.) A correspondent says: "In the early afternoon I saw in the huge Grand Place at Arras (one of the relics of the long occupation by the Spanish) the prettiest of scenes. A squadron of French dragoons had halted there, and the men had dismounted. The long row of horses had each a new master, for the dragoons had put children into the saddle, and each child had on its head a dragoon's casque."
      • How Drummer Bent saved a Wounded Comrade.
        • (From the picture by S. Begg. By permission of The Illustrated London News.)
        • Major J. H. S. Dimmer, V.C.
        • The German Colonies are marked in solid black.
      • (From the picture by S. Begg. By permission of The Illustrated London News.)
      • Major J. H. S. Dimmer, V.C.
      • The German Colonies are marked in solid black.
    • MORE TALES FROM THE TRENCHES.
    • A Pleasant Scene in the Grand Place at Arras.
      • (From the picture by D. Macpherson. By permission of The Sphere.) A correspondent says: "In the early afternoon I saw in the huge Grand Place at Arras (one of the relics of the long occupation by the Spanish) the prettiest of scenes. A squadron of French dragoons had halted there, and the men had dismounted. The long row of horses had each a new master, for the dragoons had put children into the saddle, and each child had on its head a dragoon's casque."
    • (From the picture by D. Macpherson. By permission of The Sphere.) A correspondent says: "In the early afternoon I saw in the huge Grand Place at Arras (one of the relics of the long occupation by the Spanish) the prettiest of scenes. A squadron of French dragoons had halted there, and the men had dismounted. The long row of horses had each a new master, for the dragoons had put children into the saddle, and each child had on its head a dragoon's casque."
    • How Drummer Bent saved a Wounded Comrade.
      • (From the picture by S. Begg. By permission of The Illustrated London News.)
      • Major J. H. S. Dimmer, V.C.
      • The German Colonies are marked in solid black.
    • (From the picture by S. Begg. By permission of The Illustrated London News.)
    • Major J. H. S. Dimmer, V.C.
    • The German Colonies are marked in solid black.
    • CHAPTER XIX.
      • GERMANY'S COLONIAL EMPIRE.
      • British Native Troops preparing to embark at Freetown, Sierra Leone, for the Kamerun.
        • (Photo Central News.)
      • (Photo Central News.)
    • GERMANY'S COLONIAL EMPIRE.
    • British Native Troops preparing to embark at Freetown, Sierra Leone, for the Kamerun.
      • (Photo Central News.)
    • (Photo Central News.)
    • CHAPTER XX.
      • GERMANY'S VANISHING COLONIES.
        • German Camel Corps in German South-West Africa.    Photo, Underwood & Underwood.
        • Landing of British Forces on Tsing-tau Peninsula, September 23, 1914.    Photo, The Sphere.
      • German Camel Corps in German South-West Africa.    Photo, Underwood & Underwood.
      • Landing of British Forces on Tsing-tau Peninsula, September 23, 1914.    Photo, The Sphere.
    • GERMANY'S VANISHING COLONIES.
      • German Camel Corps in German South-West Africa.    Photo, Underwood & Underwood.
      • Landing of British Forces on Tsing-tau Peninsula, September 23, 1914.    Photo, The Sphere.
    • German Camel Corps in German South-West Africa.    Photo, Underwood & Underwood.
    • Landing of British Forces on Tsing-tau Peninsula, September 23, 1914.    Photo, The Sphere.
    • CHAPTER XXI.
      • THE STORY OF THE "EMDEN."
      • Captain von Müller.
        • (Photo, Record Press.)
        • The Emden, the famous German Commerce-raider.    Photo, Central News.
      • (Photo, Record Press.)
      • The Emden, the famous German Commerce-raider.    Photo, Central News.
    • THE STORY OF THE "EMDEN."
    • Captain von Müller.
      • (Photo, Record Press.)
      • The Emden, the famous German Commerce-raider.    Photo, Central News.
    • (Photo, Record Press.)
    • The Emden, the famous German Commerce-raider.    Photo, Central News.
    • CHAPTER XXII.
      • THE LAST OF THE "EMDEN," AND THE SEA FIGHT OFF CORONEL.
      • German Landing Party on the Cocos-Keeling Islands.    Photo, The Sphere
        • The yacht shown in the photograph is the Ayesha, in which the landing party escaped from the island.
        • Destruction of the German Raider Emden by H.M.S. Sydney of the Australian Navy, November 9, 1914.
      • The yacht shown in the photograph is the Ayesha, in which the landing party escaped from the island.
      • Destruction of the German Raider Emden by H.M.S. Sydney of the Australian Navy, November 9, 1914.
      • The Good Hope going down with her last Guns firing.
        • (From the picture by Norman Wilkinson. By permission of the Illustrated London News.)
      • (From the picture by Norman Wilkinson. By permission of the Illustrated London News.)
    • THE LAST OF THE "EMDEN," AND THE SEA FIGHT OFF CORONEL.
    • German Landing Party on the Cocos-Keeling Islands.    Photo, The Sphere
      • The yacht shown in the photograph is the Ayesha, in which the landing party escaped from the island.
      • Destruction of the German Raider Emden by H.M.S. Sydney of the Australian Navy, November 9, 1914.
    • The yacht shown in the photograph is the Ayesha, in which the landing party escaped from the island.
    • Destruction of the German Raider Emden by H.M.S. Sydney of the Australian Navy, November 9, 1914.
    • The Good Hope going down with her last Guns firing.
      • (From the picture by Norman Wilkinson. By permission of the Illustrated London News.)
    • (From the picture by Norman Wilkinson. By permission of the Illustrated London News.)
    • CHAPTER XXIII.
      • THE FALL OF KIAO-CHAU.
        • Landing of the Japanese at Laoshan Bay.    Photo, Record Press.
      • Landing of the Japanese at Laoshan Bay.    Photo, Record Press.
      • The city of Warsaw looking north-west across the Vistula, which here flows under the three bridges connecting the city proper with its suburb, Praga.
        • Warsaw is beautifully situated on the left bank of the Vistula, which is here about as wide as the Thames at Gravesend. Most of the city is built on a low hill which rises from the broad plain to a terrace 120 feet above the river-level. Though dating from the Middle Ages, Warsaw is very modern in appearance. It is a large manufacturing centre, but has none of the smoke and grime which characterize most industrial towns. There is no livelier or gayer city in the east of Europe. Its buildings are fine, and its well-laid-out public gardens are a great attraction. In Sigismund Square is the former royal castle, round which the life of the city is centred. Four main thoroughfares radiate from it, and on or near these are the chief public buildings, churches, and statues. The Church of the Holy Ghost contains the heart and monument of the great Polish musician Chopin. The population of Warsaw in 1911 was 872,478, one-third of the people being Jews. Praga is the junction of six great trunk lines which converge from Vienna, Berlin, and Danzig on the one side of the frontier, and from Petrograd, Moscow, and Kiev (South Russia) on the other.
      • Warsaw is beautifully situated on the left bank of the Vistula, which is here about as wide as the Thames at Gravesend. Most of the city is built on a low hill which rises from the broad plain to a terrace 120 feet above the river-level. Though dating from the Middle Ages, Warsaw is very modern in appearance. It is a large manufacturing centre, but has none of the smoke and grime which characterize most industrial towns. There is no livelier or gayer city in the east of Europe. Its buildings are fine, and its well-laid-out public gardens are a great attraction. In Sigismund Square is the former royal castle, round which the life of the city is centred. Four main thoroughfares radiate from it, and on or near these are the chief public buildings, churches, and statues. The Church of the Holy Ghost contains the heart and monument of the great Polish musician Chopin. The population of Warsaw in 1911 was 872,478, one-third of the people being Jews. Praga is the junction of six great trunk lines which converge from Vienna, Berlin, and Danzig on the one side of the frontier, and from Petrograd, Moscow, and Kiev (South Russia) on the other.
    • THE FALL OF KIAO-CHAU.
      • Landing of the Japanese at Laoshan Bay.    Photo, Record Press.
    • Landing of the Japanese at Laoshan Bay.    Photo, Record Press.
    • The city of Warsaw looking north-west across the Vistula, which here flows under the three bridges connecting the city proper with its suburb, Praga.
      • Warsaw is beautifully situated on the left bank of the Vistula, which is here about as wide as the Thames at Gravesend. Most of the city is built on a low hill which rises from the broad plain to a terrace 120 feet above the river-level. Though dating from the Middle Ages, Warsaw is very modern in appearance. It is a large manufacturing centre, but has none of the smoke and grime which characterize most industrial towns. There is no livelier or gayer city in the east of Europe. Its buildings are fine, and its well-laid-out public gardens are a great attraction. In Sigismund Square is the former royal castle, round which the life of the city is centred. Four main thoroughfares radiate from it, and on or near these are the chief public buildings, churches, and statues. The Church of the Holy Ghost contains the heart and monument of the great Polish musician Chopin. The population of Warsaw in 1911 was 872,478, one-third of the people being Jews. Praga is the junction of six great trunk lines which converge from Vienna, Berlin, and Danzig on the one side of the frontier, and from Petrograd, Moscow, and Kiev (South Russia) on the other.
    • Warsaw is beautifully situated on the left bank of the Vistula, which is here about as wide as the Thames at Gravesend. Most of the city is built on a low hill which rises from the broad plain to a terrace 120 feet above the river-level. Though dating from the Middle Ages, Warsaw is very modern in appearance. It is a large manufacturing centre, but has none of the smoke and grime which characterize most industrial towns. There is no livelier or gayer city in the east of Europe. Its buildings are fine, and its well-laid-out public gardens are a great attraction. In Sigismund Square is the former royal castle, round which the life of the city is centred. Four main thoroughfares radiate from it, and on or near these are the chief public buildings, churches, and statues. The Church of the Holy Ghost contains the heart and monument of the great Polish musician Chopin. The population of Warsaw in 1911 was 872,478, one-third of the people being Jews. Praga is the junction of six great trunk lines which converge from Vienna, Berlin, and Danzig on the one side of the frontier, and from Petrograd, Moscow, and Kiev (South Russia) on the other.
    • CHAPTER XXIV.
      • THE FIRST ATTACK ON WARSAW.
        • Von Hindenburg's First Advance on Warsaw.
      • Von Hindenburg's First Advance on Warsaw.
    • THE FIRST ATTACK ON WARSAW.
      • Von Hindenburg's First Advance on Warsaw.
    • Von Hindenburg's First Advance on Warsaw.
    • CHAPTER XXV.
      • VON HINDENBURG FOILED.
        • German Infantry moving across the Plain towards Warsaw.    Photo, The Sphere.
        • The Grand Duke Nicholas.
      • German Infantry moving across the Plain towards Warsaw.    Photo, The Sphere.
      • The Grand Duke Nicholas.
      • Homeless and Ruined.    Photo, Daily Mirror.
        • The Germans have burned down the houses of these Polish peasants, and have destroyed their little all. The latter are here seen raking over the ground in the hope of finding something which has escaped destruction. The bitter Russian winter is rapidly approaching, and they have no where to lay their heads.
      • The Germans have burned down the houses of these Polish peasants, and have destroyed their little all. The latter are here seen raking over the ground in the hope of finding something which has escaped destruction. The bitter Russian winter is rapidly approaching, and they have no where to lay their heads.
    • VON HINDENBURG FOILED.
      • German Infantry moving across the Plain towards Warsaw.    Photo, The Sphere.
      • The Grand Duke Nicholas.
    • German Infantry moving across the Plain towards Warsaw.    Photo, The Sphere.
    • The Grand Duke Nicholas.
    • Homeless and Ruined.    Photo, Daily Mirror.
      • The Germans have burned down the houses of these Polish peasants, and have destroyed their little all. The latter are here seen raking over the ground in the hope of finding something which has escaped destruction. The bitter Russian winter is rapidly approaching, and they have no where to lay their heads.
    • The Germans have burned down the houses of these Polish peasants, and have destroyed their little all. The latter are here seen raking over the ground in the hope of finding something which has escaped destruction. The bitter Russian winter is rapidly approaching, and they have no where to lay their heads.
    • CHAPTER XXVI.
      • STORIES FROM THE BATTLEFIELDS.
        • Siberian Cavalry crossing a River.    Photo, Record Press.
      • Siberian Cavalry crossing a River.    Photo, Record Press.
    • STORIES FROM THE BATTLEFIELDS.
      • Siberian Cavalry crossing a River.    Photo, Record Press.
    • Siberian Cavalry crossing a River.    Photo, Record Press.
    • CHAPTER XXVII.
      • THE SECOND RUSSIAN ADVANCE ON CRACOW.
        • The Tatra Range of the Carpathians.    Photo, Exclusive News Agency.
        • Position of the Russians in Galicia at Christmas.
        • Russian Artillery in the Carpathians.    Photo, Record Press.
      • The Tatra Range of the Carpathians.    Photo, Exclusive News Agency.
      • Position of the Russians in Galicia at Christmas.
      • Russian Artillery in the Carpathians.    Photo, Record Press.
    • THE SECOND RUSSIAN ADVANCE ON CRACOW.
      • The Tatra Range of the Carpathians.    Photo, Exclusive News Agency.
      • Position of the Russians in Galicia at Christmas.
      • Russian Artillery in the Carpathians.    Photo, Record Press.
    • The Tatra Range of the Carpathians.    Photo, Exclusive News Agency.
    • Position of the Russians in Galicia at Christmas.
    • Russian Artillery in the Carpathians.    Photo, Record Press.
    • CHAPTER XXVIII.
      • THE SECOND ASSAULT ON WARSAW.
      • Diagram showing the Russian Position behind the Marshes of the Bzura.
        • Notice the causeway leading from Kutno to Piatek. Along this causeway the Germans made their frontal attack.
      • Notice the causeway leading from Kutno to Piatek. Along this causeway the Germans made their frontal attack.
      • A German Battery overwhelmed by Cossacks.
        • This grim picture illustrates the fate of the Germans who were trapped in the "pocket" as described on page 255.
      • This grim picture illustrates the fate of the Germans who were trapped in the "pocket" as described on page 255.
    • THE SECOND ASSAULT ON WARSAW.
    • Diagram showing the Russian Position behind the Marshes of the Bzura.
      • Notice the causeway leading from Kutno to Piatek. Along this causeway the Germans made their frontal attack.
    • Notice the causeway leading from Kutno to Piatek. Along this causeway the Germans made their frontal attack.
    • A German Battery overwhelmed by Cossacks.
      • This grim picture illustrates the fate of the Germans who were trapped in the "pocket" as described on page 255.
    • This grim picture illustrates the fate of the Germans who were trapped in the "pocket" as described on page 255.
    • CHAPTER XXIX.
      • WARSAW AGAIN SAVED.
      • The Battle of the Bzura. Russian Field Artillery in Action.
      • Christmas in the Trenches of Poland.    Photo, Alfieri.
        • This photograph shows an advanced trench in Poland as held by the Germans on Christmas Day. It will be noticed that two sentinels in full marching order keep watch, and that the rifles of the defenders lie in position, ready to be discharged at a moment's notice. A typical German officer is seen sleeping close to the sentry in the foreground.
      • This photograph shows an advanced trench in Poland as held by the Germans on Christmas Day. It will be noticed that two sentinels in full marching order keep watch, and that the rifles of the defenders lie in position, ready to be discharged at a moment's notice. A typical German officer is seen sleeping close to the sentry in the foreground.
    • WARSAW AGAIN SAVED.
    • The Battle of the Bzura. Russian Field Artillery in Action.
    • Christmas in the Trenches of Poland.    Photo, Alfieri.
      • This photograph shows an advanced trench in Poland as held by the Germans on Christmas Day. It will be noticed that two sentinels in full marching order keep watch, and that the rifles of the defenders lie in position, ready to be discharged at a moment's notice. A typical German officer is seen sleeping close to the sentry in the foreground.
    • This photograph shows an advanced trench in Poland as held by the Germans on Christmas Day. It will be noticed that two sentinels in full marching order keep watch, and that the rifles of the defenders lie in position, ready to be discharged at a moment's notice. A typical German officer is seen sleeping close to the sentry in the foreground.
    • CHAPTER XXX.
      • AT WAR WITH TURKEY.
        • Constantinople, the ancient Byzantium.    Photo, Exclusive News Agency.
        • The Persian Gulf.[175]
      • Constantinople, the ancient Byzantium.    Photo, Exclusive News Agency.
      • The Persian Gulf.[175]
    • AT WAR WITH TURKEY.
      • Constantinople, the ancient Byzantium.    Photo, Exclusive News Agency.
      • The Persian Gulf.[175]
    • Constantinople, the ancient Byzantium.    Photo, Exclusive News Agency.
    • The Persian Gulf.[175]
    • CHAPTER XXXI.
      • FIGHTING IN CHALDEA.
        • Hoisting the Union Jack at Basra.    Photo, Illustrated London News.
        • Basra and Kurna.
      • Hoisting the Union Jack at Basra.    Photo, Illustrated London News.
      • Basra and Kurna.
    • FIGHTING IN CHALDEA.
      • Hoisting the Union Jack at Basra.    Photo, Illustrated London News.
      • Basra and Kurna.
    • Hoisting the Union Jack at Basra.    Photo, Illustrated London News.
    • Basra and Kurna.
    • CHAPTER XXXII.
      • THE CAMPAIGN IN THE CAUCASUS.
      • The Campaign on the Caucasian Frontier.
        • (Inset—The Turkish Advance.)
      • (Inset—The Turkish Advance.)
    • THE CAMPAIGN IN THE CAUCASUS.
    • The Campaign on the Caucasian Frontier.
      • (Inset—The Turkish Advance.)
    • (Inset—The Turkish Advance.)
    • CHAPTER XXXIII.
      • THE BATTLE OF THE SERBIAN RIDGES.
        • Map to illustrate the Campaign of November and December 1914.
        • King Peter watching the Battle of the Ridges.
      • Map to illustrate the Campaign of November and December 1914.
      • King Peter watching the Battle of the Ridges.
    • THE BATTLE OF THE SERBIAN RIDGES.
      • Map to illustrate the Campaign of November and December 1914.
      • King Peter watching the Battle of the Ridges.
    • Map to illustrate the Campaign of November and December 1914.
    • King Peter watching the Battle of the Ridges.
    • CHAPTER XXXIV.
      • THE BATTLE OFF THE FALKLAND ISLANDS.
        • Battle off the Falkland Islands, December 8, 1914.
      • Battle off the Falkland Islands, December 8, 1914.
      • The Sinking of the Nürnberg by the British Light Cruiser Kent.
        • (Drawn by Montagu Dawson from a sketch by an eye-witness. By permission of The Sphere.)
      • (Drawn by Montagu Dawson from a sketch by an eye-witness. By permission of The Sphere.)
    • THE BATTLE OFF THE FALKLAND ISLANDS.
      • Battle off the Falkland Islands, December 8, 1914.
    • Battle off the Falkland Islands, December 8, 1914.
    • The Sinking of the Nürnberg by the British Light Cruiser Kent.
      • (Drawn by Montagu Dawson from a sketch by an eye-witness. By permission of The Sphere.)
    • (Drawn by Montagu Dawson from a sketch by an eye-witness. By permission of The Sphere.)
    • CHAPTER XXXV.
      • NAVAL RAIDS ON THE EAST COAST OF ENGLAND.
      • The Bombardment of Hartlepool, showing shells falling on the Battery at the end of the Pier.
        • (By permission of The Illustrated London News.)
      • (By permission of The Illustrated London News.)
    • NAVAL RAIDS ON THE EAST COAST OF ENGLAND.
    • The Bombardment of Hartlepool, showing shells falling on the Battery at the end of the Pier.
      • (By permission of The Illustrated London News.)
    • (By permission of The Illustrated London News.)
    • CHAPTER XXXVI.
      • WINTER IN THE TRENCHES.
        • The Fighting near La Bassée, December 19, 1914.
      • The Fighting near La Bassée, December 19, 1914.
      • The Prince of Wales making a Tour of the British Lines in Flanders.
        • (Photo, Central News.)
      • (Photo, Central News.)
      • "Three Cheers for the King!"
        • His Majesty the King, followed by the Prince of Wales and the Staff, passing along the lines of British troops drawn up to greet him. (Drawn by F. Matania from a sketch by an eye-witness. By permission of The Sphere.)
        • Christmas Greetings from the Trenches.    Photo, Photopress.
        • Bomb-throwers at Work.    By permission of The Sphere.
      • His Majesty the King, followed by the Prince of Wales and the Staff, passing along the lines of British troops drawn up to greet him. (Drawn by F. Matania from a sketch by an eye-witness. By permission of The Sphere.)
      • Christmas Greetings from the Trenches.    Photo, Photopress.
      • Bomb-throwers at Work.    By permission of The Sphere.
      • END OF VOLUME III.
        • PRINTED IN GREAT BRITAIN.
        • FOOTNOTES:
      • PRINTED IN GREAT BRITAIN.
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • WINTER IN THE TRENCHES.
      • The Fighting near La Bassée, December 19, 1914.
    • The Fighting near La Bassée, December 19, 1914.
    • The Prince of Wales making a Tour of the British Lines in Flanders.
      • (Photo, Central News.)
    • (Photo, Central News.)
    • "Three Cheers for the King!"
      • His Majesty the King, followed by the Prince of Wales and the Staff, passing along the lines of British troops drawn up to greet him. (Drawn by F. Matania from a sketch by an eye-witness. By permission of The Sphere.)
      • Christmas Greetings from the Trenches.    Photo, Photopress.
      • Bomb-throwers at Work.    By permission of The Sphere.
    • His Majesty the King, followed by the Prince of Wales and the Staff, passing along the lines of British troops drawn up to greet him. (Drawn by F. Matania from a sketch by an eye-witness. By permission of The Sphere.)
    • Christmas Greetings from the Trenches.    Photo, Photopress.
    • Bomb-throwers at Work.    By permission of The Sphere.
    • END OF VOLUME III.
      • PRINTED IN GREAT BRITAIN.
      • FOOTNOTES:
    • PRINTED IN GREAT BRITAIN.
    • FOOTNOTES:
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